Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Latest Topics

  • 0

    Gluten Sensitivity and Depression

    This article originally appeared in the Spring 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

    Celiac.com 03/02/2009 - Patients with depression are told they have a chemical imbalance.  If someone else in their family is also depressed, the “gene card” is played.  “Your depression is genetic”, they are told.

    I have been in practice for over 20 years and I find the above data to be false.  Consistently we find patients who are suffering from depression and anxiety to be gluten sensitive. How could a food cause depression?  Let’s take a look.

    After the digestive tract, the most commonly affected system to be affected by gluten is the nervous system. It is thought that depression can be caused by gluten in one of two ways.  

    The first area addresses the inflammatory changes gluten can cause. A gluten sensitive individual’s immune system responds to the protein gliadin.  Unfortunately, that protein is similar in structure to other proteins present in the body, including those of the brain and nerve cells. A cross reactivity can occur whereby the immune system “confuses” proteins in the body for the protein gliadin.  This is called cellular mimicry and the result is the body attacking it’s own tissues with inflammation resulting. When inflammation happens in the brain and nervous system, a variety of symptoms can occur, including depression. Research shows us that patients with symptoms involving the nervous system suffer from digestive problems only 13% of the time.  This is significant because mainstream medicine equates gluten sensitivity almost exclusively with digestive complaints.

    In a study examining blood flow to the brain, 15 patients with untreated celiac disease were compared to 15 patients treated with a gluten-free diet for a year.  The findings were amazing. In the untreated group, 73% had abnormalities in brain circulation by testing while only 7% in the treated group showed any abnormalities. The patients with the brain circulation problems were frequently suffering from anxiety and depression as well.

    In addition to circulation problems, other research looks at the association between gluten sensitivity and its interference with protein absorption.  Specifically the amino acid tryptophan can be deficient. Tryptophan is a protein in the brain responsible for a feeling of well-being and relaxation. A deficiency can be correlated to feelings of depression and anxiety.

    Our society is too willing to accept a “chemical imbalance” as an explanation for their symptoms and instead of getting to the root cause of the condition, simply swallow a pill – a pill that in the case of anti-depressants has very dangerous and sometimes lethal side effects.

    The frequency with which we are able to successfully taper patients off their anti-depressants is considered “unbelievable” to many mainstream doctors, yet we do it regularly.  How is that possible?  We actually diagnose the root cause of the depression.  Frequently the culprit is gluten, and in such cases a gluten-free diet is the main path to recovery.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Guest Kristen

    Posted

    Great article! It is very encouraging to read about atypical symptoms of gluten sensitivity, it is important for people to know that digestive problems are not the only symptoms.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest laura

    Posted

    Fantastic article. I was diagnosed with celiac disease a year ago with few digestive symptoms. Looking back on my year I feel like I've finally come out of a depression that lasted for years and I know it is due to cutting out the gluten. I would love to read the study.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Dr Vikki Petersen

    Posted

    To answer Laura's request to be able to read the study I quoted in the above article, here it is:

    G. Addolorado, 'Regional Cerebral Hypoperfusion in Patients with Celiac Disease,' The American Journal Of Medicine 116 (2004):312-7.

    The data truly is amazing. Enjoy!

     

    To your good health,

    Dr Vikki Petersen

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Amber

    Posted

    Wonderful article. It's time for society to wake up and stop sweeping our troubles under a rug. Let's get rid of the 'band-aid concept' all together.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest laura

    Posted

    THANK YOU Dr. Petersen! This article is potentially life saving for those of us who suffer from severe mood disorders. It is wonderful to realize that I am coming 'out of the dark' in regards to my bipolar disorder. Just yesterday, I tested positive to gluten intolerance. Frankly, I was not surprised. If this is indeed the reason for my mood instability, then I have found the missing piece to the puzzle I have fought two decades to solve. I just wish the word would spread faster! So many that are suffering from 'Bandaid treatment'-which helps very little and hinders a lot-could stop the dead end cycle of 'cures' that actually do harm. Doctors need to give this study more credit and help their patients have more hope for improvement and possible recovery. A life time of psychiatric pills should be saved as a last resort.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Rachel

    Posted

    This is wonderful insight! I've been handed the 'gene card' many times. Interestingly enough, many of my family also are sensitive to milk and wheat and high gluten grains. My husband has been eating a low gluten diet and 'coincidentally' my mental health has been better. Thank you Dr. Petersen for sharing this info with us!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Very good article and I can attest to the feelings of depression brought on by gluten. Trouble is they don't bother to test people with depression who haven't already been branded with the CS or Gluten allergy/intolerance, and treat them drugs.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    This was my first visit to the site, well written article. I suffer from Bi polar, diagnosed 4 years ago, and CS 6 months ago. I always new something wasn't right, and 2 years ago they said I had migraines! I am starting nursing school soon and I hope that more doctors look at diagnosing from more than just one angle. I know I will be researching it further to find out how much is part of the mood disorder and how much is CS for my Bi Polar. The migraines are gone since I went gluten-free. Once again, Thank you, it is hard to find good info. and your providing the journal where we can read the original findings adds to your credit.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Finally an answer that has taken me over 30 years to find! I have suffered with episodes of severe depression since I was 14 years old. I knew there had to be a link to my diet but couldn't find the key ingredient. Even after I was diagnosed with gluten intolerance at age 28 no one told me about the link to depression so I continued the search. Now I know I am not going crazy and have proof to show everyone else.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I never knew this. I still have some slight amount of gluten in my diet, with most removed. Been this way for three years and my health has improved dramatically, with no overt symptoms for quite some time. However, I have had problems with anxiety and occasional depression which did not make much sense. Now it does. Looks like it's time to remove the last instances of gluten from my diet.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Dr. Vikki Petersen, a Chiropractor and Certified Clinical Nutritionist is co-founder and co-director, of the renowned HealthNow Medical Center in Sunnyvale, California. Acclaimed author of a new book, "The Gluten Effect" - celebrated by leading experts as an epic leap forward in gluten sensitivity diagnosis and treatment. Dr. Vikki is acknowledged as a pioneer in advances to identify and treat gluten sensitivity. The HealthNOW Medical Center uses a multi-disciplined approach to addressing complex health problems. It combines the best of internal medicine, clinical nutrition, chiropractic and physical therapy to identify the root cause of a patient's health condition and provide patient-specific wellness solutions. Her Web site is:
    www.healthnowmedical.com

×