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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/13/2013 - Dermatitis herpetiformis is the cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease. Both celiac and dermatitis herpetiformis are diseases of gluten-sensitivity.
    People with celiac disease, even with asymptomatic forms, often experience reduced bone density from metabolic bone disease. This led scientists to ask if dermatitis herpetiformis results in bone loss as celiac disease does.
    However, there is very little data about bone density in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, so that question remained unanswered.
    To find an answer, a team of researchers recently set out to compare bone mineral density (BMD) of people with celiac disease against bone mineral density for dermatitis herpetiformis patients.
    The research team included K. Lorinczy, M. Juhász, M. Csontos, B. Fekete, O. Terjék, P.L. Lakatos, P. Miheller, D. Kocsis, S. Kárpáti, Z. Tulassay, and T. Zágoni.
    The team looked at 34 people with celiac disease, 53 with dermatitis herpetiformis, and 42 healthy people as a control group. The average patient age was 38.0 +/- 12.1 for the celiac disease group, 32.18 +/- 14.95 for the dermatitis herpetiformis group, and 35.33 +/- 10.41 years for the healthy control group.
    For each group, the team used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to measure bone mineral density of the lumbar spine, the left femoral neck and radius.
    The team defined low bone density, osteopenia and osteoporosis as a body mass density (BMD) T-score between 0 and -1, between -1 and -2.5, and under -2.5, respectively.
    In the lumbar region, the team found decreased BMD in 49% of the patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, in 62% of the patients with celiac disease, and in 29% of healthy control subjects.
    Overall, they measured lower BMD at the lumbar region in people with dermatitis herpetiformis and celiac disease than in the healthy subjects (0.993 +/- 0.136 g/cm2 and 0.880 +/- 0.155 g/cm2 vs. 1.056 +/- 0.126 g/cm2; p < 0.01).
    There was no difference in density of bones composed of dominantly cortical compartment (femoral neck) in dermatitis herpetiformis and healthy subjects.
    This study shows that low bone mass is common in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, and that bone mineral density for these patients is significantly lower in those bones with more trabecular than cortical composition.
    Source:
    Rev Esp Enferm Dig. 2013 Apr;105(4):187-193.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/20/2017 - Nickel is the most common cause of contact allergy, and nickel exposure can result in systemic nickel allergy syndrome, which mimics irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Nickel is also found in wheat, which invites questions about possible nickel exposure from wheat in some cases of contact dermatitis. However, nickel hasn't really been studied in relation to glutenâ€related diseases.
    A research team recently set out to evaluate the frequency of contact dermatitis due to nickel allergy in NCWS patients diagnosed by a doubleâ€blind placeboâ€controlled(DBPC) challenge, and to identify the characteristics of NCWS patients with nickel allergy. The research team included Alberto D'Alcamo, Pasquale Mansueto, Maurizio Soresi, Rosario Iacobucci, Francesco La Blasca, Girolamo Geraci, Francesca Cavataio, Francesca Fayer, Andrea Arini, Laura Di Stefano, Giuseppe Iacono, Liana Bosco, and Antonio Carroccio.
    The are variously affiliated with the Dipartimento di Biologia e Medicina Interna e Specialistica (DiBiMIS), Internal Medicine Unit, University Hospital, Palermo, Italy; the Surgery Department, University Hospital, Palermo, Italy; Pediatric Unit, "Giovanni Paolo II" Hospital, Sciacca (ASP Agrigento), Italy; DiBiMIS, Gastroenterology Unit, University Hospital, Palermo, Italy; Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, "ARNAS Di Cristina" Hospital, Palermo, Italy; Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Biologiche Chimiche e Farmaceutiche (Ste.Bi.CeF), University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.
    Their team conducted a prospective study of 54 women and 6 men, with an average age of 34.1 year, and diagnosed with NCWS from December 2014 to November 2016. They also included a control group of 80 age†and sexâ€matched subjects with functional gastrointestinal symptoms.
    Patients reporting contact dermatitis related to nickelâ€containing objects were given a nickel patch sensitivity test. The tests showed that six out of sixty patients (10%) with NCWS suffered from contact dermatitis and nickel allergy, and this frequency was statistically higher than observed in the 5 percent seen in the control group.
    Compared to NCWS patients who did not suffer from nickel allergy, NCWS patients with nickel allergy commonly showed a higher rates of skin symptoms after wheat consumption. Contact dermatitis and nickel allergy are more frequent in NCWS patients than in subjects with functional gastrointestinal disorders.
    Moreover, large numbers of these patients showed cutaneous manifestations after wheat ingestion. Nickel allergy should be evaluated in NCWS patients who have cutaneous manifestations after wheat ingestion.
    More study is needed to determine the relationship between nickel sensitivity and NCWS.
    Source:
    Nutrients 2017, 9(2), 103; doi:10.3390/nu9020103

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    I used to use Oil of Olay sensitive skin, but when I got a Nima Sensor it tested positive for gluten and I switched to Jergens Daily moisture fragrance free. Nima isn't meant for testing non food products, but I can't take the risk.  
    OMG I’ve having the same issue with dairy, sugars, even natural sugars like fruits! I’m following this thread. I really thought I was the only one! Thanks for asking it. My dr says I just need to go a good 6 months gluten/sugar/dairy free to “reset my system” and it should help. We’ll see. Good luck to you sir!   AJ
    We call IBS the I Be Stumped non diagnosis. It's a cop out by doctors. IBS is a symptom NOT a diagnosis.   Oh AG, how terribly awful!!!!!!!! I've read about that skin condition before but never known anyone who actually had it. OOF!
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