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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    Dr. Lionel Fry from the U.K. talked about DH. He stated that all patients with DH have some degree of enteropathy, even though less than 1 in 10 patients with DH have GI symptoms. Dr. Fry also said 40 percent of DH relatives have gluten-sensitive enteropathy. He went on to say that the gluten-free diet can take 6 months to two years to get healing of DH, and a relapse of the DH rash may take 2 to 12 weeks to occur after someone eats gluten. Total disappearance of IGA skin deposits may take up to 7 years after a gluten-free diet is started. Dr. Reunala from Finland talked about associated diseases. He quoted others who said 5 to 14 percent of DH patients have thyroid disease and went on to say that DH patients have an increased incidence of lymphoma but a gluten-free diet seems to protect against lymphoma.

    Scott Adams
    The the connection between iodine and Dermatitis Herpetiformis is briefly described by the following excerpt from a resource guide of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America:
    Iodine can trigger eruptions in some people (with dermatitis herpetiformis). However, iodine is a essential nutrient and should not be removed from the diet without a physicians supervision. Iodine does not contain gluten. Iodine can worsen the symptoms of skin lesions in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis. When the deposits of IgA have been cleared from the skin over time by following a gluten free diet, iodine should no longer present any problem for dermatitis herpetiformis patients. As background, for those who are not familiar with Dermatitis Herpetiformis, the following description comes from a resource guide of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America:
    Dermatitis herpetiformis (dermatitis herpetiformis) is a chronic disease of the skin marked by groups of watery, itch blisters. The ingestion of gluten (the proteins gliadin and prolamines contained in wheat, rye, oats, and barley) triggers an immune system response that deposits a substance, IgA (immonuglobin A), under the top layer of skin. IgA is present in affected as well as unaffected skin. dermatitis herpetiformis is a hereditary autoimmune disease linked with celiac disease. If you have dermatitis herpetiformis, you always have celiac disease. With dermatitis herpetiformis the primary lesion is on the skin rather than the small intestine. The degree of damage to the small intestine is often less severe or more patchy then those with only celiac disease. Both diseases are permanent and symptoms/ damage will occur after comsuming gluten. When my husband was diagnosed with dermatitis herpetiformis last November, he went to visit a expert in dermatitis herpetiformis, Dr. John J. Zone, at the University of Utah (USA). The written instructions Dr. Zone gave him included the following statement:
    The mineral iodine is known to make the disease (dermatitis herpetiformis) worse. For this reason, foods and supplements high in iodine should be avoided. Table salt which is not iodized should be used. This can be found in most grocery stores with the other salts. Avoid kelp and other seaweed products, and do not use sea salt. If you take any nutritional supplements, examine them carefully to avoid any iodine containing ingredients. It is not necessary for dermatitis herpetiformis patients to eliminate iodine completely from their diet, merely to avoid foods high in iodine as described above. Dr. Zone also explained that dermatitis herpetiformis patients need not avoid iodine indefinitely. Iodine is an important mineral for our bodies. dermatitis herpetiformis patients can stop avoiding iodine when their rash symptoms clear up which can take anywhere from a few months to a couple of years on a gluten-free diet.
    More about iodine:
    Intake of large amounts of inorgana iodide is known to exacerbate symptoms and a few patients have been reported to improve on low iodide diets. However, this is not a mainstay of treatment and need only be considered if patients are consuming excessive iodide in the form of vitamin pills, kelp, or seafood. Likewise, some patients have reported exacerbation with thyroid hormone replacement therapy and thyrotoxicosis. In such cases, excessive thyroid replacement should be avoided and thyrotoxicosis treated appropriately. Dermatitis Herpetiformis, John J. Zone MD, Curr Probl Dermatol, Jan/Feb 1991, p36 Dermatitis Herpetiformis is considered a rare skin disease. The true incidence and prevalence of dermatitis herpetiformis appears to vary in different areas of the world and may vary within the same country. During 1987, 158 cases of documented dermatitis herpetiformis were identified in the state of Utah out of a population of 1.6 million, a prevalence of 9.8 per 100,000. Dermatitis Herpetiformis, John J. Zone MD, Curr Probl Dermatol, Jan/Feb 1991, p15

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/08/2008 - Scientists at the University of Finland have announced the discovery of a particular gene that is tied to the development of the celiac-associated skin disease dermatitis herpetiformis, which is the form of celiac disease found in a full 25% of all celiacs. The gene is called myosin IXB, and it is located on chromosome 19p13.
    In addition to being connected with a higher risk of celiac disease in both Dutch and Spanish populations, the gene has been associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus, erythmatosus, and rheumatoid arthritis, which means that myosin IXB is likely a shared risk factor in all of these disorders.
    Researchers looked at nearly 500 Hungarian and Finnish families, plus another 270 patients and controls. What they found was a substantial linkage to chromosome 19p13 (LOD 3.76 P=0.00002) that lends great weight to the notion that this is a substantial risk factor. Other variants of the myosin IXB gene showed no connection with celiac disease, though they did show a small connection to dermatitis herpetiformis.
    Both phenotypes show a significant connection indicating that the role meaning that there still may be a role being played by nearby genes. They are calling for more comprehensive genetic and functional studies to determine what the exact nature of the role the myosin IXB gene in both celiac disease and in dermatitis herpetiformis.
    As more studies are conducted, and more data emerges, we are likely to get a much clearer genetic picture of both celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis. A clearer genetic picture will likely lead to new and novel approaches to treatment that permit much more effective targeting of treatment.
    Journal of Med. Genet. 2007 Dec 12


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/14/2014 - Exposure to stressful stimuli, such as inflammation, cause cells to up-regulate heat shock proteins (Hsp), which are highly conserved immunomodulatory molecules. Research points to Hsp involvement in numerous autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune bullous diseases and celiac disease.
    To better understand the role of Hsp in autoimmune bullous diseases, a research team conducted the first investigation of the humoral autoimmune response to Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH; n = 26), bullous pemphigoid (BP; n = 23), and pemphigus vulgaris (PV; n = 16), the first representing a cutaneous manifestation of celiac disease.
    The research team included Kasperkiewicz M1, Tukaj S, Gembicki AJ, Silló P, Görög A, Zillikens D, Kárpáti S. They are affiliated with the Department of Dermatology at the University of Lübeck in Lübeck, Germany.
    In patients with active BP and PV, serum levels of autoantibodies against these Hsp matched the healthy control subjects (n = 9-14), while circulating autoantibodies against Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 increased at the active disease stage of DH.
    Further analysis showed that in patients who adopt a gluten-free diet, these anti-Hsp autoantibodies decreased in relation to serum autoantibodies against epidermal and tissue transglutaminase during remission of skin lesions.
    Larger groups of patients must be studied to confirm these findings, but these results indicate that autoantibodies against Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 play a key role in the development and maintenance of DH, possibly also in the underlying celiac disease, and may be important in
    potentially undiscovered disease biomarkers.
    Source:
    Cell Stress Chaperones. 2014 Mar 19.

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    Have you ever considered an air fryer. We bake like cycling lady or use air fryer. To crisp them for air fryer after slicing one can soak them a bit in water then pay dry before air fry helps crisp them. Good luck no matter what you find. I try to stay with one type of oil as mixed vegetable oil they often use corn which I also can't have.  
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