Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/28/2013 - Celiac disease has been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but there is very little data from population-based studies on the rates of shared disease among these groups. To get a better picture of the issue, a team of researchers recently set out to conduct a population-based study on rates of celiac disease in people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).
    The research team included Jonas F. Ludvigsson, Pertti Aro, Marjorie M. Walker, Michael Vieth, Lars Agréus, Nicholas J. Talley, Joseph A. Murray, and Jukka Ronkainen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Medicine at Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, in Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Pediatrics at Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, the Departments of Medicine and Immunology in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, USA, the Department of NVS, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Faculty of Health at the University of Newcastle in Newcastle, Australia, the Institute of Pathology in Bayreuth, Germany, the Primary Health Care Center of Tornio, Finland, and the Institute of Health Sciences at the University of Oulu in Oulu, Finland.
    For their study, the team conducted endoscopes on a thousand randomly selected adults from the general population.
    They defined celiac disease as positive serology together with mucosal abnormalities of the small intestine. They defined any eosinophil infiltration of the esophageal epithelium as esophageal eosinophilia and EoE was defined as having at least 15 eosinophils/high-power field in biopsies from the distal esophagus.
    They used Fisher's exact test to compare the prevalence of GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, and EoE in subjects with celiac disease, and to compare the realists with those of the control group.
    Of the 400 subjects (40%) with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GORS), 155 (15.5%) had erosive esophagitis, 16 (1.6%) had Barrett's esophagus, 48 (4.8%) had esophageal eosinophilia, and 11 (1.1%) had EoE.
    They diagnosed celiac disease in eight (2%) of the 400 individuals with GORS, compared to 10 of 600, or 1.7% for the control group (p = 0.81). They also diagnosed celiac disease in 3 of 155 subjects (1.9%) with erosive esophagitis, compared with 15 of 845 (1.7%) of control subjects (p = 0.75); and 2 cases of celiac disease from the 48 (4.2%) individuals with esophageal eosinophilia (controls were 16 of 952 (1.7%), p = 0.21).
    They found no celiac disease, however, in any of the 16 subjects with Barrett's esophagus, while they did find 18 cases among the 984, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0.
    Nor did they find celiac disease in any of the 11 individuals with EoE, compared with 18 cases in the 989, or 1.8% of control subjects; p = 1.0.
    Because this population-based showed no increased risk of celiac disease among individuals with GORD, esophageal eosinophilia, or EoE, they conclude that there is no need to conduct celiac screening of individuals with GORD, or EoE screening of individuals with celiac disease.
    Source:
    Informa Healthcare. doi:10.3109/00365521.2013.792389

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/11/2014 - What’s the relationship, if any, between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and celiac disease? Research studies have produced variable results.
    Researchers A. J. Lucendo, Á. Arias, and J. M. Teniaso recently set out to conduct a systematic review of medical literature to determine if there’s any evidence of a connection between both diseases. They used the MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCOPUS databases to conduct electronic searches with keywords relating to EoE and celiac disease.
    Depending on study heterogeneity, they used random-effects models as needed (I2). To assess publication bias, they used funnel plot analysis, along with the Begg–Mazumdar, Harbord and Egger tests.
    Their keyword search produced 197 significant study references; 30 were included in the quantitative summary, with most showing serious methodological inconsistencies. The team found significant publication bias in favor of short studies reporting positive connections between the two diseases.
    The prevalence of EoE in celiac patients ranged from 0% to 10.7% (I2 = 78.9%). Rates of celiac disease in EoE varied wildly, between 0.16% and 57.1% (I2 = 89%).
    One high-quality, prospective, randomly selected, population-based study showed a celiac disease rate of 1.1%, with no cases of EoE. Numerous quantitative summaries of celiac prevalence suffer from clinical and methodological differences. That is, they are are not similar enough to draw good conclusions.
    A gluten-free diet produced histological remission of EoE in 32.1% of celiac patients (95% confidence interval, 14.9–52.2%; I2 = 52.2%), which was similar to that expected for wheat elimination in EoE patients.
    There are not really enough valid studies to completely rule in or out a true association between EoE and celiac disease, currently available evidence does not support any such connection. In fact, the only epidemiologically valid study indicates that these diseases are not connected.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Volume 40, Issue 5, pages 422–434, September 2014. DOI: 10.1111/apt.12859

  • Popular Contributors

  • Forum Discussions

    I guess I should have added that she already had an endoscopy and biopsy as follow up to an eosinophilic esophagitis diagnosis. The doctor ordered the bloodwork after getting the results back. She is a picky eater and I swear only eats gluten lol It is going to be a struggle if we have to go gluten free.
    If any tests for celiac disease are positive, it generally means that follow up tests, perhaps a biopsy, are needed to confirm CD. Be sure that your daughter continues to eat gluten until all testing is completed, as not eating it could skew future test results.
    Thank you for your reply. I have just edited my post to add nausea! Another big symptom.  Did your doctor send you straight for endoscopy with negative blood results? Or do those other blood tests first? 
×
×
  • Create New...