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    Latest Study Says Celiac Disease Reduces Ovarian Reserves

    Jefferson Adams
    • Compared to healthy controls, female celiac patients of reproductive age showed decreased AMH levels and ovarian reserves that reflected the length of celiac duration; the longer the celiac disease, the greater the decrease.

    Latest Study Says Celiac Disease Reduces Ovarian Reserves
    Caption: Image: CC--Thomas van de Weerd

    08/21/2018 - Does celiac disease have any kind of adverse effect on ovarian reserve levels in women of reproductive age? To get an answer, a team of researchers recently conducted a study of ovarian reserve in patients of reproductive age with celiac disease using anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels, antral follicle counts (AFCs), and ovarian volume.

    The research team included Erol Cakmak, Savas Karakus, Ozlem Demirpence, and Banu Demet Coskun. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology, the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the Department of Biochemistry, Cumhuriyet University Faculty of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey, and with the Department of Gastroenterology, Kayseri Training and Research Hospital in Kayseri, Turkey.

    For this study, their team included 46 female celiac patients and 40 healthy female subjects of reproductive age, 18–45 years of age. 

    The team drew blood samples from both groups on days 2–4 of the menstrual cycle, and measured follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), and AMH levels. On the same day, the team measured AFCs and ovarian volume for each patient. They also recorded patient body mass index (BMI), gravidity/parity/abortions/alive counts, disease duration, and Marsh histological classification.

    The results showed no statistically significant differences between celiac disease patients and control groups in terms of mean age, BMI, or median gravidity/parity/abortions/alive counts.  Also, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of average FSH, LH, E2, PRL levels, right and left ovarian volumes, and median right and left ovarian AFCs. 

    The team found AMH levels to be markedly lower in the celiac group. The Spearman correlation test showed no significant connection between AMH levels and age, BMI, FSH, LH, E2, PRL levels, right and left ovarian volumes, right and left ovarian AFCs, or Marsh histological classification.

    However, the team did find that, compared to healthy controls, female celiac patients of reproductive age showed decreased AMH levels and ovarian reserves that reflected the length of celiac duration; the longer the celiac disease, the greater the decrease.

    It appears that, especially over time, celiac disease can reduce ovarian reserves, which could have an adverse affect on fertility. 

    Read more at:  Med Sci Monit. 2018; 24: 1152–1157.

     

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    Guest CMcCulley

    Posted

    What would be interesting is to know if the celiac disease patients follow a strict gluten free diet and if that makes a difference or not in their ovarian reserve. For instance a control group, gluten free celiac disease patients and non-gluten free celiac disease patients. Also, they say the median age of the celiac disease patients is 35.2 +/- 7.9 and the control group is 31.5 +/- 9.5 and this is not statistically significant. However, since fertility changes with age, it seems that there might be a difference between celiac disease and control patients with medians that differ by 3.7 years. I got pregnant naturally at age 43, was diagnosed with celiac disease about 35 and had symptoms of celiac disease for years before being diagnosed.

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    It’s a bit discouraging as a woman, being 30, following a strict gluten free diet to hear that my chances of fertility are low. 

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    Guest MChekowski

    Posted

    CMcCulley you have given me hope ?, I'm 39 was dignosed with celiac disease at 31, and just went through a false pregnancy

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    Guest K. Jordan

    Posted

    My personal health history is a rejection of this study. I was diagnosed with celiac disease by blood test and biopsy at the age of 40, six months after the birth of my second child, after suffering symptoms of celiac disease since early childhood. (My worst celiac disease symptoms were in childhood until puberty, and then again post-pregnancies.) I was healthy during both my pregnancies and gave birth to full-term, healthy newborns at ages 37 and 40. I was also super fertile, conceiving both babies in the first month of trying. Now at 51 I have not yet reached menopause. Just wanted to put my story out there so as to not create too much fertility fear in the female celiac community.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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