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    Jefferson Adams

    Gluten-free Diet Does Not Increase Cardiovascular Risk in Children with Celiac Disease

      In this study, children with celiac disease showed no increase in cardiovascular disease risk factors after one year on a strict gluten-free diet.

    Caption: Image: CC--PoYang_博仰

    Celiac.com 05/14/2019 - A strict gluten-free diet is the only proven treatment for celiac disease, yet researchers still don't know what effect, if any, the diet might have on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. 

    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether following a gluten-free diet influences risk factors for cardiovascular disease among newly diagnosed pediatric celiac disease subjects. Their results suggest that a gluten-free diet does not increase cardiovascular disease risk, at least in the short-term.

    The research team included E Zifman, O Waisbourd-Zinman, L Marderfeld, N Zevit, A Guz-Mark, A Silbermintz, A Assa, Y Mozer-Glassberg, N Biran, D Reznik, I Poraz, and R Shamir. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Diseases, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach-Tikva; Pediatric Gastroenterology Clinic, Pediatric Division, Meir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba; Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel; and the Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics Department, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach-Tikva.

    For their study, the team prospectively enrolled pediatric patients receiving upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for suspected celiac disease.  Team members recorded physical and lab data related to cardiovascular disease risk, both at celiac diagnosis and after 1 year following a gluten-free diet, and assessed any variation in risk fo cardiovascular disease. The team used both paired tests or Wilcoxon nonparametric tests, as needed.

    In this study, children with celiac disease showed no increase in cardiovascular disease risk factors after one year on a strict gluten-free diet. The results did show a small increase in median fasting insulin levels, but no increase in insulin resistance as measured by homeostatic model assessment. During the same period, rates of dyslipidemia remained steady, while median high-density lipoprotein levels increased. The long-term implications of these small changes is not clear.

    So, at least in the short run, it looks like a gluten-free diet doesn't increase risk for cardiovascular disease in children with celiac disease. Further study is needed to determine if that's true long-term.

    Read more at the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition; 2019 May;68(5):684-688.


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Does a Gluten-free Diet Increase Cardiovascular Risk in Celiac Disease Patients?
    Celiac.com 07/10/2013 - Some doctors and nutritionists have expressed concern that a gluten-free diet might increase the risk of cardiovascular problems in patients with celiac disease.
    To get closer to an answer for this question, a team of researchers set out to assess changes of multiple cardiovascular risk factors in celiac patients evaluated before and during a gluten-free diet.
    The research team included B. Zanini, E. Mazzoncini, F. Lanzarotto, C. Ricci, B.M. Cesana, V. Villanacci, and A. Lanzini of the Gastroenterology Unit at the University and Spedali Civili in Brescia, Italy.
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    Compared to baseline, those following a gluten-free diet showed significantly higher body mass index (21.4±3.4 vs. 22.5±3.5; p
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    However, their final takeaway was that a gluten-free diet causes substantial changes to cardiovascular risk factors in celiac patients, but does not consistently point to worse or better risk profiles overall, which suggests that the diet is unlikely to contribute to the development of atheromatous plaques, or "hardening" in the walls of the arteries.
    So, the short of it is that eating a gluten-free diet doesn't appear to create any added heart disease risk for people with celiac disease.
    Source:
    Dig Liver Dis. 2013 May 17. pii: S1590-8658(13)00147-3. doi: 10.1016/j.dld.2013.04.001.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/13/2015 - People who suffer from celiac disease with persistent villous atrophy do not face any higher risk of ischemic heart disease or atrial fibrillation, according to a recent study by a research team in Sweden.
    This is important, because patients with celiac disease do face an increased risk of death from cardiovascular causes, so it is mildly encouraging that persistent villous atrophy resulting from gluten exposure does not appear to affect overall or cardiovascular mortality.
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    Celiac Disease Almost Doubles Risk of Heart Disease
    Celiac.com 03/14/2016 - Compared with the general population, people with celiac disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (CAD), and 1.4 times as likely to suffer a stroke, according to a large retrospective study presented at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions.
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    Do Adolescents with Celiac Disease Face Higher Cardiovascular Risk?
    Celiac.com 10/05/2017 - Recent data show that more adults with celiac disease may face a higher risk for cardiovascular disease compared with the general population.
    A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the association of with cardiovascular disease risk factors at late adolescence in a cross-sectional population-based study.
    The research team included Assa A, Frenkel-Nir Y, Tzur D, Katz LH, and Shamir R. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Liver Disease, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah-Tikva; the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, and with the Medical Corps of the Israeli Defense Force.
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    Patients with celiac disease far more likely to have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypercoagulability, and hyperlipidemia, than were non-celiacs.
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    Source:
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