Jump to content

Important Information

This site places cookies on your device (Cookie settings). Continued use is acceptance of our Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Member Statistics

    84,894
    Total Members
    4,125
    Most Online
    kristenb1
    Newest Member
    kristenb1
    Joined
  • 0

    Antibiotics Put Children at Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease


    Jefferson Adams
    Antibiotics Put Children at Risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease
    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Eye/See

    Celiac.com 11/28/2012 - A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether childhood antianaerobic antibiotic exposure is associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Their findings show that children who are treated with antianaerobic antibiotics face a significantly higher risk of developing IBD.

    Photo: CC--Eye/SeeThe team included Matthew P. Kronman, MD, MSCE, Theoklis E. Zaoutis, MD, MSCE, Kevin Haynes, PharmD, MSCE, Rui Feng, PhD, and Susan E. Coffin, MD, MPH.They are affiliated variously with the Division of Infectious Diseases, Seattle Children’s Hospital at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, the Division of Infectious Diseases at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The team's findings appear in the 24 September issue of Pediatrics.

    To get a better picture regarding use of antibiotics on children and a possible connection to IBD, the team conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from 464 UK ambulatory practices in The Health Improvement Network.

    The study looked at all children in the network with 2 or more years of follow-up from 1994 to 2009. The team screened and excluded anyone with previous IBD. They then cataloged all antibiotic prescriptions used by all children in the study. Finally, they tracked the children's data from practice enrollment and IBD development, practice de-registration, 19 years of age, or death.

    Their defined study parameters included the following antianaerobic antibiotics: penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, penicillin/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations, tetracyclines, clindamycin, metronidazole, cefoxitin, carbapenems, and oral vancomycin.

    Their study looked at 1,072,426 children for a total of 6.6 million person-years of follow-up. Of those children, 748 developed IBD. Children treated with antianaerobic antibiotics had nearly 1.52 cases of IBD per ten-thousand person years, while those who were not given antibiotics saw just 0.83 cases per ten-thousand person-years; for an 84% relative risk differential.

    Antibiotic exposure throughout childhood was associated with the development of IBD, but this relationship decreased with increasing age at exposure. That is, the longer doctors waited to give children antibiotics, the more the risk of iBD went down.

    Children treated with antibiotics before 1 year of age showed an adjusted hazard ratio of 5.51 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.66–18.28), while that decreased to 2.62 (95% CI: 1.61–4.25) for children first treated at 5 years old, and to 1.57 (95% CI: 1.35–1.84) for those first treated at 15 years of age. Overall, each course of antibiotics increased the IBD hazard by 6% (4%–8%).

    The study showed that children who received two or more antibiotic courses were more highly likely to develop IBD than those who received 1 to 2 courses, with adjusted hazard ratios of 4.77 (95% CI: 2.13–10.68) versus 3.33 (95% CI: 1.69–6.58).

    So, based on this study, treating children with antianaerobic antibiotics puts them at risk for developing IBD. It will be interesting to see how the medical community responds to this study, and whether there is greater effort made to avoid giving these powerful antibiotics to children.

    What do you think? Do you have IBD? Did you receive these antibiotics as a kid? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.

    Source:

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest M Wenger

    Posted

    There are many natural alternatives to using prescription antibiotics. I wish I had known about them before damaging my children with antibiotics needlessly. My oldest daughter still has stomach problems 2 years after being on 2 different antibiotics in 2 weeks time. I've never used them since, but use herbs, minerals, wholesome food, and probiotics.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Suzanne

    Posted

    I took antibiotics many, many times as a child and adult (up until just a few years ago, and I'm in my mid 50s). I also developed celiac disease (severe, but undiagnosed for the first half of my life). I strongly believe that these two facts are related. Antibiotics were given out like candy when I grew up--for every cold and flu, which I had every month or two as a child (poor immunity). I have many health issues now, and I believe antibiotics were a huge part of their development (food allergies, autoimmune issues, etc.) I do not recommend them now, unless there is a life threatening issue--they are "anti-life."

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I'm 51 now. I took Bicillin prophylacticly for a number of years as a young child to prevent/reduce incidence of bronchitis, an after effect of complicated measles aged 3 (pneumonia), which I suppose was treated with antibiotics. I also had quite bad asthma, hayfever and allergies, which I have thankfully 'grown out of.' I had a total colectomy for refractory ulcerative colitis after years of ill health 10 years ago. In hind sight, I probably had UC as a teenager, but not diagnosed until 30.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Am J Gastroenterol 2000;95:2154-2156,2285-2295.
    Celiac.com 10/14/2000 - According to new research done by Dr. Andrew J. Wakefield, of the Royal Free and University College Medical School, in London (published in the September issue of the American Journal of Gastroenterology) children with developmental disorders seem to be at risk of developing a unique type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This newly discovered type lacks the typical features seen in Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis.
    The researchers studied 60 children with developmental disorders (50 had autism, five had Aspergers syndrome, two had disintegrative disorder, one had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, one had schizophrenia and one had dyslexia.) whose ages ranged from 3 to 16 years old to compare the clinical and histologic features against 37 developmentally normal controls who underwent evaluation for possible IBD.
    According to Dr. Wakefield and colleagues The combination of ileocolonic lymphoid nodular hyperplasia and colitis in children with developmental disorders distinguished them from developmentally normal children with similar symptoms (including abdominal pain and constipation) in whom lymphoid nodular hyperplasia and histopathological change were uncommon. They emphasize that their finding are consistent with those of other recent case studies, and that in their study inflammatory changes were detected in the upper gastrointestinal tract that were unique in children with autism and IBD, compared with developmentally normal children with IBD.
    Further, there is accumulating evidence of a specific type of enterocolitis in autism that makes it tempting to suggest that a gut-brain interaction is involved in the pathogenesis of what many researchers are now calling autistic enterocolitis. The detection of opioid peptides of dietary origin in the urine of some of the affected children further supports this theory. The team emphasizes that further studies and more evidence is needed to establish a direct link between an inflamed gut and the brain in those with autism.

  • Popular Contributors

×