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    Homemade Yogurt Resolves Irritable Bowel Symptoms in Most Patients

    Jefferson Adams
    • Can eating homemade yogurt make IBS symptoms disappear? A new study say it can do just that, with nearly 90 percent of IBS patients seeing improvement in six months or less.

    Homemade Yogurt Resolves Irritable Bowel Symptoms in Most Patients
    Caption: Photo: CC--Marco Verch

    Celiac.com 01/24/2018 - Irritable bowel syndrome can be a frustrating condition for both patients and doctors. It can be difficult to diagnose, and the symptoms can be unpleasant, to say the least. For many people with IBS, medication does not adequately treat the symptoms. Many people just suffer and live with the IBS and its symptoms.

    Now, a new study may bring some hope to people with IBS. The study was conducted by Manju Girish Chandran, and colleagues from the Mary Breckinridge ARH Hospital in Hyden, Kentucky. For the study, 189 patients consumed 2 to 3 cups of homemade yogurt every day and recorded their symptoms. Their responses were assessed every 2 months for 6 months.

    At the end of the study, 169 patients saw their IBS go into remission within 6 months. And these weren't some special set of patients. They were true IBS sufferers. Some patients in this study had lived with symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome for 9 or 10 years. These results show that the daily consumption of homemade yogurt can lead to a complete resolution of symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome in the vast majority of IBS patients.

    "Our study is based on the fact that there is an internal gut–brain microbiome axis," Dr Chandran told Medscape Medical News. "If you modulate the intestinal microbiome, you can actually achieve remission in some cases." That is one of the reasons Dr Chandran and her colleagues wanted to assess the potential of homemade yogurt with Lactobacilli to influence the gut microbiome.

    In this study, 89% of the study participants saw complete remission, which is defined as the relief of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms and one or two normal bowel movements daily. In addition to being cheap, says Dr Chandran, the yogurt can be enjoyed plain, or mixed with fruit or made into a smoothie as part of a normal diet.

    Dr. Chandran reported the results of the study at the World Congress of Gastroenterology. This is one of the more exciting studies on IBS in a long time. The idea that incorporating simple homemade yogurt into the diet can lead to a remission of IBS is nothing short of earth-shattering.

    How to make the yogurt used in the study:
    The yogurt is cheap and simple to make. First, boil a gallon of milk for 5 minutes and let it cool to lukewarm. Next, mix in 1 cup of Dannon plain yogurt, which is used as a starter and source of Lactobacilli.

    Place in an oven with the light on overnight (do not turn the oven on), and then refrigerate the next morning. Basically, you want it to sit all night at about 110 degrees F. Save 1 cup from each batch to use as a starter for the next batch.

    This news is potentially a game-changer for IBS-sufferers, since the solution is both simple and affordable for most people. Do you or anyone you know have IBS? If you try this treatment, please let us know how it works for you.

    Read more at: Medscape.com

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    Guest Patrick Pigott

    Posted

    Thank you for the interesting and helpful story. Question: Can all forms of milk (low-fat, 1%, 2%, whole milk, lactose-free) be used to make the home made yogurt?

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    It is a good article - except IBS does not exist - it is not an illness - it is a category explained by, "we have no @#$%& idea what you have so let's just say you have IBS. For what its worth, IBS is most often anything from SIBO to Celiac or mild UC to a candida overgrowth/gut dysbiosis basically one of the many hundreds of autoimmune syndromes that exist or have yet to be discovered. IBS is just a convenient "container" for the medical industry. So yes, Yogurt and Kefir is right up there for all you people diagnosed with Voldemort syndrome!

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    Very interesting! I will try this and share this info with other people I know that suffer from IBS. However, I would like to know if it has to be Dannon, or can it be ANY plain yogurt? Was Dannon used in the study? Thank you and greetings from Munich

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    Is using homemade yogurt necessary? Why not just buy and eat plain yogurt?

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    It is a good article - except IBS does not exist - it is not an illness - it is a category explained by, "we have no @#$%& idea what you have so let's just say you have IBS. For what its worth, IBS is most often anything from SIBO to Celiac or mild UC to a candida overgrowth/gut dysbiosis basically one of the many hundreds of autoimmune syndromes that exist or have yet to be discovered. IBS is just a convenient "container" for the medical industry. So yes, Yogurt and Kefir is right up there for all you people diagnosed with Voldemort syndrome!

    The fact that you can cite varied causes shows diagnosis is improving. And the uncontrolled study did not screen for IBS-SIBO or IBS-candida and so it is possible that the group was a mixed batch. Still most participants benefited. Which for these sufferers is likely more more important than knowing the underlying mechanism. Hopefully in the next decade or two the various IBS conditions will be sorted but until then treatment will have to be based empirically.

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    Guest Jefferson

    Posted

    Is using homemade yogurt necessary? Why not just buy and eat plain yogurt?

    Good question. The study focused on home made yogurt using Danon as a starter. Plain yogurt could be fine, but the data doesn't currently support that idea.

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    Guest Jefferson

    Posted

    Very interesting! I will try this and share this info with other people I know that suffer from IBS. However, I would like to know if it has to be Dannon, or can it be ANY plain yogurt? Was Dannon used in the study? Thank you and greetings from Munich

    Yes, the study focused on home made yogurt using Danon as a starter. Any plain yogurt might be fine, but the data for this study pertain to Danon as a starter. Good luck!

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    Guest Sandy

    Posted

    The reason that homemade yogurt is used is because the long incubation period results in far, far greater numbers of the lactobacillus than found in commercial yogurts.

    This 'treatment' is similar to that advocated by the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Fage yogurt, which has a slightly different mix of lactobacillus than many other commerical yogurts, was one of the brands recommended by Elaine Gottschall. 

    Wikipedia notes, "Specific carbohydrate diet is a restrictive diet first described by Dr. Sidney V. Haas in 1924 to treat celiac disease, and further refined in his 1951 medical text The Management of Celiac Disease. It was later re-popularized in 1987 by Elaine Gottschall, the mother of one of Haas's patients." The idea behind the SCD is that eating very specific foods over time remodels the population of flora and fauna in the gut, and Haas felt that celiac disease could actually be cured in this way. He was the undisputed worldwide expert on celiac sprue, until after his death, when competing scientists displaced his theories with their own.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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