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    Hepatic Injury in Adult Celiac Disease


    Scott Adams


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    Author: Hagander B; Berg NO; Brandt L; Nord en A; Sj olund K; Stenstam M.
    Source: Lancet, 1977 Aug 6, 2:8032, 270-2.

    In an attempt to determine the frequency of liver injury in adult coeliac disease (A.C.D.) the case records of 74 consecutive patients were examined. In 13 cases histological sections of the liver were available and in 5 of these there were signs of reactive hepatitis. Histological signs of distinct hepatic injury with cirrhosis and/or chronic active hepatitis were found in 7 other patients. In 5 of these serum-IgA was normal, whereas 16 out of 20 control patients with liver cirrhosis not associated with A.C.D. had raised serum-IgA. Serum-aspartate-aminotransferase and serum-alanine-aminotransferase were determined in 53 patients; 29 had raised concentrations. In 19 patients serum-aminotransferases were repeatedly determined before and during the dietary regimen and there was a significant reduction in enzyme concentrations during treatment. The median concentration of serum-alkaline-phosphatase was also reduced during treatment but not significantly. The histological evidence of liver injury in 16% and the abnormal liver-function tests in 39% of the patients indicate that hepatic injury is common in A.C.D. Since liver-function tests or liver biopsy specimens were available for only about two-thirds of the patients, liver damage in A.C.D. may be more common than indicated by these results. The effect of a gluten-free diet on aminotransferase concentrations indicates that the liver injury may be reversible and suggests that in some A.C.D. patients, progressive liver damage may be prevented by suitable treatment. Since A.C.D. is not always recognized, the diagnosis should be considered in patients with liver disease of unknown aetiology.

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    Author: Bardella MT; Fraquelli M; Quatrini M; Molteni N; Bianchi P; Conte D
    Address: Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Universit a degli Studi di Milano, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore, Italy.
    Source: Hepatology, 1995 Sep, 22:3, 833-6
    The prevalence of hypertransaminasemia and the effect of gluten-free diet (GFD) were evaluated in 158 consecutive adult celiac patients, 127 women and 31 men, aged 18 to 68 years (mean, 32). At diagnosis, 67 patients (42%) had raised aspartate and/or alanine transaminase levels (AST and ALT; mean, 47 IU/L, range, 30 to 190; and 61 IU/L, range, 25 to 470, respectively), whereas 91 patients had normal liver function tests (LFT). Patients with and without hypertransaminasemia were comparable for epidemiological data, body mass index (18.5 vs. 19.6), and severity of intestinal histological involvement. All patients were given a strict GFD and were followed for 1 to 10 years (median, 4). At 1 year, a highly significant improvement in intestinal histology was observed in both groups.

    Roy Jamron
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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