Jump to content
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Scientists Zero in on Cause of Multiple Sclerosis

      Researchers have been looking at the role of myelin proteins in the development multiple sclerosis (MS). A recently published report suggests that additional non-myelin-related protein may also play a role

    Caption: Image: CC--walknboston

    Celiac.com 03/25/2019 - Some researchers have suspected that myelin proteins may be involved in multiple sclerosis (MS). A recent report in Science and Translational Medicine, suggests that additional non-myelin-related protein may also play a role. Researchers examined protein samples from the brains of 31 people who had died from suspected or confirmed MS. They found that T cells from 12 people reacted to the enzyme guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose synthase, or GDP-L-fucose-synthase. The enzyme usually helps to process sugars that are crucial to cell function and communication, including the function and communication of neurons.

    Researcher Dr Roland Martin, from the University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland, has helped to figure out which myelin proteins and peptides come under attack in MS, and which cells and immune molecules do the attacking. Paper coauthor Mireia Sospedra, of University Hospital of Zurich, suggests that “other auto-antigens might be involved in initiating the disease." She believes that the attack on this newly identified auto-antigen triggers tissue damage that exposes other myelin proteins that are likely targets for attack.

    Sospedra suspects that some variations in myelin protein structure might be susceptible to immune attack, and that genetic variation in immune cells might influence the body’s response to a given infection. She suggests that the offending antigens may differ between individuals, as the structure of our molecular machinery is genetically determined. 

    Northwestern University immunology professor Stephen Miller, who did not work on this research, but has worked with Dr. Martin in the past, suggests that there’s likely not just “one particular virus or bacteria or environmental factor that triggers MS in every patient. There are probably many things that can trigger an autoimmune reaction against a particular infection," he says. "But the more antigens we identify that can contribute to the disease, the better."

    Researchers have pointed out that numerous autoimmune diseases seem to cluster in certain gene sequences. Multiple gene areas seem to correlate with numerous autoimmune conditions. Prior comprehensive genetic association studies have found 90 genetic areas associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and/or rheumatoid arthritis.

    Celiac disease and MS sufferers share some things in common, including a tendency to develop rosacea. Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares the same genetic risk location as autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease. The connections between multiple sclerosis and celiac disease is a common topic of discussions on many forums.

    Read more at: medscape.com

    \-->

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/11/2011 - People with multiple sclerosis and their first-generation relatives have higher rates of celiac disease than the general population, according to a report by a research team in Spain.
    For the study, a research team led by Dr. Luis Rodrigo of University Hospital, Central Asturias, Spain looked at rates of serological, genetic, and histological disease markers in 72 multiple sclerosis patients and 126 of their first-degree relatives. They then compared the results against data from 123 healthy control subjects.
    The team found rates of celiac disease among multiple sclerosis patients that are 5 to 10 times higher than rates for the general population worldwide, which average between 1% and 2%.
    The team found similar levels of  HLA-DQ2 markers in both multiple sclerosis patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). They found eight multiple sclerosis patients (11.1%) who showed mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) on duodenal biopsy. Results also showed that 26 of 126 first-degree relatives (32%) had celiac disease.
    Multiple Sclerosis patients also displayed increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%).
    Source:

    BMC Neurology 2011, 11:31doi:10.1186/1471-2377-11-31

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/24/2016 - Rosacea is a common inflammatory skin condition that shares the same genetic risk location as autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease.
    Researchers have noted a clustering of autoimmune diseases in patients with rosacea. In fact, a recent genomewide association study found 90 genetic areas associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and/or rheumatoid arthritis, but did not address a possible association with rosacea.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess any connections between rosacea and T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, respectively. The research team included Alexander Egeberg, MD, Peter Riis Hansen, MD, PhD, DMSci, Gunnar Hilmar Gislason, MD, PhD, Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen, MD, PhD, DMSci, National Allergy Research Center, Department of Dermato-Allergology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark, Department of Cardiology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
    For their study, the team conducted a population-based case-control study in which a total of 6,759 patients with rosacea were matched with 33,795 control subjects on age, sex, and calendar time.
    They used conditional logistic regression to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
    After adjustment for smoking and socioeconomic status, patients with rosacea had significantly increased ORs for T1DM (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.41-4.73), celiac disease (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.35-3.07), multiple sclerosis (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.20-2.28), and rheumatoid arthritis (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.82-2.52). The connection was seen most commonly in women, while for men, only the rheumatoid arthritis connection was statistically significant.
    As a disclaimer, the researchers point out that they were unable to distinguish between the various sub-types and severities of rosacea.
    However, they did find that rosacea in general is associated with T1DM, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis in women, whereas the association in men was statistically significant only for rheumatoid arthritis.
    Source:
    Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/30/2017 - The human gut is home to a huge and diverse number of microorganisms that perform various biological roles. Disturbances in a healthy gut microbiome might help to trigger various inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS).
    Human gut-derived commensal bacteria suppress CNS inflammatory and demyelinating disease. Can they improve the treatment of multiple Sclerosis (MS)?
    A team of researchers recently set out to evaluate evidence that gut commensals may be used to regulate a systemic immune response and may, therefore, have a possible role in treatment strategies for multiple Sclerosis.
    The research team included Ashutosh Mangalam, Shailesh K. Shahi, David Luckey, Melissa Karau, Eric Marietta, Ningling Luo, Rok Seon Choung, Josephine Ju, Ramakrishna Sompallae, Katherine Gibson-Corley, Robin Patel, Moses Rodriguez, Chella David, Veena Taneja, and Joseph Murray.
    In a recent article, the team reports on their identification of human gut-derived commensal bacteria, Prevotella histicola, which can suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II transgenic mouse model.
    P. histicola suppresses disease through the modulation of systemic immune reactions. P. histicola challenge caused a reduction in pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 cells and an increase in CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells, tolerogenic dendritic cells, and suppressive macrophages.
    This study indicates that gut commensals may regulate a systemic immune response, and so may have a role in future treatments for multiple Sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases such as celiac disease.
    Source:
    Cell.com. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2017.07.031

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/30/2018 - Rosacea is one of the most common skin diseases, and usually manifests as chronic inflammation of the eyes and the central part of the face. Rosacea is medically harmless, but it can trigger strong self-consciousness and reduce people’s overall enjoyment of life. For most people, symptoms of rosacea include flushing and erythrosis or reddening of the face. A small percentage of patients also get the formation of papules and pustules, with phymata.
    Doctors have posited numerous possible triggers, including hypochlorhydria, dysmotility, anatomic anomalies of the intestine, and immunologic causes. SIBO is an acronym for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, a medical condition marked by an abnormally high concentration of bacteria in the jejunal aspirate on culture.
    SIBO is more common in people with rosacea than it is in the general population, and when SIBO is treated with antibiotics, skin lesions vanish in nearly 100% of cases. This remission lasts for at least 9 months in about 80% of patients. 
    The same thing happened when unresponsive SIBO patients receiving placebo as part of a study were switched to antibiotics, so the evidence is very strong. It’s well known that numerous patients with rosacea have stomach and gut complaints, including dyspepsia, bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain of a cramping nature, altered bowel habits such as alternating constipation and diarrhea, and meteorism.
    It’s also not uncommon for rosacea patients have to suffer from medical conditions such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, gastritis due to H. pylori overgrowth, lipase deficiencies, hypochlorhydria, and diseases affecting the small intestinal mucosa. Rosacea patients show a good response to a variety of antibiotics, including tetracycline or macrolide drugs, metronidazole, or chloramphenicol.
    The overwhelmingly positive response to antibiotics, coupled with the fact that many rosacea patients see symptom improvement when treated with drugs that speed intestinal movement, lends support to the idea that skin lesions have a bacterial origin. Still, evidence of bacterial role in rosacea has been far from clear. Some researchers suspect that rosacea lesions result from increased intestinal permeability in patients with SIBO, which in turn might lead to translocation or pro-inflammatory cytokine release.
    Earlier studies have linked rosacea with certain genetic variants in the genomes of rosacea sufferers that were strongly associated with the disorder, including genetic variants in or near the HLA-DRA and BTNL2 genes.
    Interestingly, these areas of the genome are also associated with autoimmune disease, including type I diabetes and celiac disease.
    Read more about rosacea and SIBO at News-medical.net, and at Rosacea.org.

×
×
  • Create New...