• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,938
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    jennbai824
    Newest Member
    jennbai824
    Joined
  • 0

    Women Beer Drinkers Have Higher Rates of Psoriasis


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 09/10/2010 - Women who regularly drink beer may face higher risk of developing psoriasis, an autoimmune disorder that causes skin rashes and other, according to a new study, though  beverages, such as light beer and wine, showed no such elevated risk.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    For the study, a team of researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Boston University enrolled 82,869 women who were not originally diagnosed with psoriasis. They monitored the women for nearly fifteen years, from 1991 through 2005.

    During the study period, subjects used the women Nurses' Health Study II to report their regular alcohol consumption, and any diagnosis of psoriasis. The results showed that even relatively small amounts of beer corresponded to an increase psoriasis diagnosis. Women who drank just 2.3 beers a week saw their psoriasis rates rise by almost 80%.

    For women who drink five regular beers a week, the risk of developing psoriasis is nearly double that of non-drinkers. Does this mean women shouldn't drink beer? Not exactly.

    "We can say that if a woman would like to consume alcohol and if she has a family history of psoriasis or known psoriasis in the past or some other reason she might be predisposed to psoriasis, the alcohol of choice probably should not be nonlight beer," said Dr. Abrar A. Qureshi, lead author of an article on the study published in Archives of Dermatology.

    But Bruce Bebo, director of research and medical programs at the National Psoriasis Foundation, says the findings warrant "more investigation to determine whether there's a real connection or not."

    Earlier studies have also tied psoriasis rates to alcohol consumption, although the nature of this connection is not well understood. The fact that no other types of alcohol in this study showed the same association with psoriasis was of particular interest to Bebo.

    "There is evidence that alcohol consumption can affect immune responses and psoriasis is an autoimmune disease," Bebo said. "There's also some evidence that it can affect the biology of  keratinocytes (certain skin cells). But ... then why would it be nonlight beer, why not wine or other alcohol? Maybe there's something in wine that ... might reverse the effect."

    Another study in the same issue of journal reports that people with psoriasis suffer higher rates of depression, anxiety and even suicidal thoughts.

    That study, by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, found that men with psoriasis suffered from these adverse mental health outcomes more than women.

    Source:

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest R. Weinbach

    Posted

    It is interesting that nothing was said about testing those with psoriasis and who drank beer, for celiac disease.

    Drinking beer and psoriasis have both been linked to celiac disease. Why there was a difference between drinking light beer and regular beer in the likelihood of developing psoriasis would be an interesting topic to study.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    It is interesting that nothing was said about testing those with psoriasis and who drank beer, for celiac disease.

    Drinking beer and psoriasis have both been linked to celiac disease. Why there was a difference between drinking light beer and regular beer in the likelihood of developing psoriasis would be an interesting topic to study.

    I had excema and psoriasis as a child, well before I had beer or wine. I was diagnosed with celiac when I was 40. Maybe, they have it wrong, and it isn't beer that causes the rashes, but that the rashes are an early indicator that someone has celiac or is predisposed to developing it.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I found this very interesting because I have celiac and also have psoriasis, but have never drank regular beer only light or gluten free and not frequently at all.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   11 Members, 1 Anonymous, 413 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Br J Dermatol. 2004 Oct;151(4):891-4
    Celiac.com 11/09/2004 – A study carried out by Irish researchers to determine whether there is an association between celiac disease antibodies and psoriasis activity found that the presence of Antigliadin antibodies (AGA) did increase the severity of the disease. The researchers looked at 130 patients with psoriasis and screened them for serum IgG and IgA AGA, IgA antitransglutaminase and IgA antiendomysial antibodies. The patients were invited to undertake an endoscopy with duodenal biopsy. They found that a significantly higher proportion of psoriasis patients had elevated celiac disease associated antibody levels, and those with elevated antibodies had previously required systemic immunosuppressants or psoralen plus ultraviolet A phototherapy. Out of the 130 patients one new case of celiac disease was diagnosed. The researchers conclude that the presence of celiac disease associated antibodies in psoriasis patients correlates with greater psoriasis activity.

    Jennifer Arrington
    Celiac.com 10/12/2009 - I recently read an article in The Economist, of all places, that intrigued me.  Titled, “Breathe Easy”, (The Economist, May 23, 2009, page 85) it explained a link between eczema and asthma.  What intrigued me was the mechanism:  researchers showed that a signaling molecule called thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) secreted by damaged skin cells can enter the blood stream  and eventually sensitize the lungs to react to what should be harmless allergens.
    So, why my intrigue?  Well, I am severely gluten intolerant and have had psoriasis my entire life.  Natural doctors bemoan the fact that my ultra sensitivity to anything and everything (from vitamins and whole-food supplements to Chinese herbs) prevents them from being able to help me.  I wondered if TSLP from damaged psoriatic skin cells had sensitized my gut to react to what would otherwise be harmless food substances. 
    A quick search proved quite helpful.  First and foremost, Scott Adams had already reviewed an article that established a link between celiac disease and psoriasis back in November of 2004 (Br.J. Dermatol. 2004 Oct;151(4):891-4) 2004).  Also, a peer-reviewed journal search yielded hundreds of results that showed this was not one isolated study.  So, what about celiac disease and asthma?  Well, once again, a quick search of the celiac.com site showed many bloggers and authors personally discussing this very link. 
    Next, I went to the medical literature in the hopes of finding whether or not TSLP could be considered the culprit for hyper sensitizing me to an ever increasing list of food substances—gluten is only the start.  Researchers have proven that elevated T cells (Bulletin of Experimental Biology & Medicine. 2004 Mar; 137(3):302-7) and eosinophils ( Allergy & Asthma Proceedings. 2004 Jul-Aug; 25(4): 253-9) are found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with asthma thus proving a link of lung mucosa to gut mucosa.  If elevated TSLP from damaged skin cells could lead to asthma, and the mucosa of the lungs is linked to the mucosa of the gut, then hypothetically elevated TSLP could lead to a hypersensitive gut. 




    In other words, damaged skin cells from psoriasis elevate levels of TSLP and patients with psoriasis often have celiac disease.  There is also a link between TSLP and asthma and a link between asthma and celiac disease.  Thus, it could be argued that the TSLP from damaged skin cells plays a role in sensitizing the gut to previously harmless food substances.  Now if only a researcher out there would design a study to prove me right!
    What does this to for me?  Not much at the moment, although, I do find it incredibly interesting.  What can this exercise in possible commutability do for all of us?  Maybe train us to view our bodies as an entire, interrelated system and to take our skin lesions seriously.  What do I do to keep my psoriasis at bay?  I hold fast to the gluten free diet and consume vast quantities of fish oil which, incidentally, also aids in restoring a damaged intestinal lining…

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/12/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to look at connections between psoriasis, the liver, and the gastrointestinal tract.
    The team was made up of Paolo Gisondi, Micol Del Giglio, Alessandra Cozzi & Giampiero Girolomoni. They are associated with the Section of Dermatology and Venereology of the Department of Medicine, at the University of Verona, Italy.
    Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory, immune-mediated skin disease that is often tied to other disorders, including psoriatic arthropathy, chronic inflammatory bowel diseases, and cardio-metabolic disorders.
    Additionally, about 50% of all patients patients with psoriasis suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, from 0.2–4.3% suffer from celiac disease, and about one half of one percent suffer from Crohn's disease.
    These associated conditions may have some common genetic traits, as well as common inflammatory pathways, and their presence offers important implications in the global approach to treating psoriasis.
    In particular, common systemic antipsoriatic drugs might have a negative affect on associated cardio-metabolic conditions and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and may have important interactions with drugs commonly used to treat psoriasis.
    Moreover, the team emphasizes the importance of encouraging psoriasis patients to drastically improve their modifiable cardiovascular and liver risk factors, especially obesity, alcohol and smoking intake, because improvements could have positive impact on both the psoriasis and the patient's general well-being.
    Source:

    Dermatologic Therapy, Volume 23 Issue 2, Pages 155 - 159 - DOI: 10.1111/j.1529-8019.2010.01310.x

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2012 - Because a number of past studies examining the connection between celiac disease and psoriasis have had contradictory findings, researchers wanted to get a better idea of the actual risk of psoriasis in patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease.
    The researchers were J.F. Ludvigsson, B. Lindelöf, F. Zingone, and C. Ciacci, with the Department of Pediatrics at Sweden's Örebro University Hospital.
    For their study, they used data from 28 pathology departments in Sweden to identified individuals with celiac disease diagnosed between 1969 and 2008. They found 28,958 patients with Marsh 3 villous atrophy.
    They then used Cox regression to compare those celiac disease patients with 143,910 sex- and age-matched control subjects, and to assess the risk of psoriasis.
    They found that celiac disease was a risk factor for future psoriasis (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.54-1.92. They found that, during follow-up, 401 individuals with celiac disease and 1,139 controls were diagnosed with psoriasis.
    They found that the absolute risk of future psoriasis in patients with celiac disease was 135 per 100,000 person-years, with an excess risk of 57 cases per 100,000 person years.
    Overall, 42% of the cases of psoriasis in patients with celiac disease could be attributed to celiac disease. Moreover, in children the team saw a strong association between celiac disease and psoriasis (HR = 2.05; 95% CI = 1.62-2.60).
    Their results show that the connection between celiac disease and psoriasis seems to be far more than coincidental, as we also found a positive association between celiac disease and psoriasis before celiac diagnosis, with an odds ratio of 1.91; 95% CI = 1.58-2.31).
    They conclude that individuals with celiac disease do, in fact, face an increased risk of psoriasis both before and after celiac diagnosis.
    Source:
    J Invest Dermatol. 2011 Oct;131(10):2010-6. doi: 10.1038/jid.2011.162.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au