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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Collagenous Sprue - Second Edition of Textbook of Gastroenterology, J.B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia 1995

    Celiac that do not remain on a gluten-free diet can develop Refractory Sprue. Refractory Sprue and Collagenous Sprue patients who initially respond to a gluten-free diet many subsequently relapse despite maintaining their diet. Such patients are then refractory to further dietary therapy. In contrast, others are refractory to dietary therapy from its inception and, assuming they are truly on a gluten-free diet, may not have celiac disease; these patients are said to have unclassified Sprue. Some refractory patients with celiac disease, typical or atypical, respond to treatment with corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs. In others, there is no response and malabsorption may be progressive. Collagenous Sprue is characterized by the development of a thick band of collagen-like material directly under the intestinal epithelial cells and has been regarded by some as a separate entity from celiac disease. However, subepithelial collagen deposition has been noted in up to 36% of patients with classic Celiac Disease and in Tropical Sprue. Although individuals with large amounts of subepithelial collagen may be refractory to therapy, the presence of collagen does not , a riori, preclude a successful response to a gluten-free diet. Collagenous colitis accompanying celiac disease also has been observed and would be considered in the diagnosis of diarrhea occurring in celiac disease patients on a gluten-free diet.



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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Collagenous Sprue is a distinctive lesion of the intestinal mucosa associated with progressive malabsorption. The intestinal pathology is initially identified with the characteristic flat lesion of untreated Celiac Sprue. Thereafter, bands of eosinophilic hyaline material within the lamina propria become increasingly apparent. As the disease progresses, the mucosa becomes progressively thinner. Therapy, including the gluten-free diet, does not help. Some cases currently designated refractory or unclassified Sprue many prove to be Collagenous Sprue.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/18/2009 - A recent study used lactulose hydrogen-breath assays to show that small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is likely a routine cause of non-responsive celiac disease.
    A team of researchers from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine recently set out to assess the rates and significance of SIBO in celiac disease based on the results of quantitative culture of intestinal aspirate.
    The team was made up of Alberto Rubio-Tapia, M.D., Susan H. Barton, M.D., Joseph A. Murray, M.D., of the Mayo’s Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Jon E. Rosenblatt, M.D., of the Mayo’s department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. Their efforts were supported by the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) International Training Grant 2006 (ART) and the NIH grants DK-57892 and DK-070031 (JAM).
    Currently, the rate of SIBO in celiac disease diagnosed by quantitative culture of intestinal aspirate is not known. The team set out to assess the rate and determine the significance of SIBO in celiac disease based on the results of quantitative culture of intestinal aspirate.
    The team set out to examine the causes of non-responsive celiac disease by looking at people with celiac disease in whom culture of intestinal aspirate was assessed for the presence of both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. They defined bacterial overgrowth as culture >105 colony forming units/mL.
    In all, they evaluated 149 people with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease. They took intestinal aspirate samples from 79 (53%) patients with non-responsive celiac disease, 47 (32%) as initial work-up for mal-absorption, and in 23 (15%) with asymptomatic treated celiac disease.
    The team diagnosed 14 cases of SIBO (9.3%), nine cases of non-responsive celiac disease (11%), five cases at initial work-up for mal-absorption (11%), and 0 cases in asymptomatic treated celiac disease. Patients with a positive culture showed signs of worse mal-absorption. 67% of patients with both non-responsive celiac disease and bacterial overgrowth showed a coexistent disorder.
    The results showed that nearly 1 in 10 celiac patients had SIBO as diagnosed by quantitative culture of intestinal aspirate (9.3%). This figure included both patients with symptomatic treated or untreated celiac disease. This shows that SIBO may exist along with other maladies associated with non-responsive celiac disease.
    Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology: Volume 43(2)February 2009pp 157-161


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/22/2010 - A recent evaluation of the safety and efficacy of small intestinal release mesalamine (SIRM) for symptom relief in refractory celiac disease (RCD) shows that SIRM seems to be a safe and effective treatment option, though larger tests are needed to know for certain.
    The research team conducting the evaluation included Shailaja Jamma, MD, Daniel A. Leffler, MD, Melinda Dennis, RD, Robert M. Najarian, MD, Detlef B. Schuppan, MD, Sunil Sheth, MD, and Ciaran P. Kelly, MD,
    They set out to evaluate the safety and efficacy of small intestinal release mesalamine (SIRM) for symptom relief in refractory celiac disease.
    There are currently no adequate clinical therapies for patients with refractory celiac disease and corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressants treatments are of limited use due to side effects. SIRM has been shown to reduce local inflammation, and it is well tolerated.
    For the study, the team looked at records of the refractory celiac disease patients who received SIRM in an open-label therapeutic trial. Data included patient demographics, disease characteristics, dose and duration of SIRM therapy, and patient response.
    The team then categorized each response as complete, if symptoms resolved completely, partial if symptoms improved at least 50%, and non-responsive if symptoms improved less than 50%.
    The team treated four patients with SIRM alone and six patients with a combination of SIRM and oral budesonide. After four weeks, half of the patients showed complete response, while 10% showed a partial response. Two of the six patients were able to discontinue budesonide. One patient discontinued SIRM after complaining of headaches.
    These initial results indicate that SIRM seems to be a safe and efficacious treatment option in patients with refractory celiac disease, though a larger, more comprehensive study is needed to confirm these results.
    Source:

    J Clin Gastroenterol 2010 Sep 24. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0b013e3181f42401


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/04/2012 - Non-responsive celiac disease is very much what it sounds like: celiac disease where symptoms seem to resist treatment and continue even in the face of a gluten-free diet.
    A team of researchers recently set out to look for the most likely causes of persistent symptoms in celiac disease patients on a gluten-free diet.
    The research team included David H. Dewar, Suzanne C. Donnelly, Simon D. McLaughlin, Matthew W. Johnson, H. Julia Ellis, and Paul J. Ciclitira. They are variously affiliated with King's College London, Division of Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology, and The Rayne Institute at St. Thomas' Hospital in London.
    Their goal for the study was to investigate all patients referred to our center with non-responsive celiac disease (NRCD), to establish a cause for their continued symptoms.
    For their study, the research team assessed all non-responsive celiac disease who were referred to their gastroenterology center over an 18-mo period.
    They then established the etiology of ongoing symptoms for these patients. For all patients, the team established a thorough case history and conducted a complete examination with routine blood work including tissue transglutaminase antibody measurement.
    Additionally, each patient was examined by a specialist gastroenterology dietician to try to spot any gaps in their diets, or any hidden sources of gluten consumption.
    When possible, the team conducted a follow-up small intestinal biopsy, and compared the results against the biopsies from the referring hospital.
    Patients with persistent symptoms received colonoscopy, lactulose hydrogen breath testing, pancreolauryl testing and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen.
    The team monitored patient progress over a minimum of two year period. Overall, the team looked at 112 patients with non-responsive celiac disease. They determined that twelve of those did not actually have celiac disease. Of the remaining 100 patients, nearly half, 45%, were not adequately following a strict gluten-free diet. Of these, 24 (53%) were found to be accidentally consuming gluten, while 21 (47%) admitted to not faithfully following a gluten-free diet.
    Microscopic colitis was found in 12% and small bowel bacterial overgrowth in 9%. Refractory celiac disease was found in 9%. Three of these were diagnosed with intestinal lymphoma. After 2 years, 78 patients remained well, eight had continuing symptoms, and four had died.
    In most cases of non-responsive celiac disease, the team found a reversible cause can be found in 90%. In the vast number of those cases, continued consumption of gluten was the main cause.
    The team is proposing the use of an algorithm for further investigation of the matter.
    Source:
    World J Gastroenterol. 2012 Mar 28;18(12):1348-56.

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