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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Origin and Immunophenotype of Aberrant IEL in Patients with Refractory Celiac Disease Type II


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 04/23/2012 - Aberrant intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IELs) are one of the major features of refractory celiac disease type II RCDII. They are categorized as pre-malignant cells, which can give rise to aggressive enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATL).


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    Photo: CC - audreyjm529A medical research team recently studied the origin and immuno-phenotype of aberrant IEL in RCDII patients. The research team included G.J. Tack, R.L. van Wanrooij, A.W. Langerak, J.M. Tjon, B.M. von Blomberg, D.A. Heideman, J. van Bergen, F. Koning, G. Bouma, C.J. Mulder, and M.W Schreurs. They are affiliated with the Gastroenterology and Hepatology, VU University Medical Center, The Netherlands.

    The team set out to better understand the origin and characteristics of aberrant IELs by scrutinizing T-cell receptor (TCR) rearrangements, and through immunophenotypic analysis of aberrant IELs.

    For their study,  the team looked for TCR delta, gamma, and beta rearrangements in duodenal biopsies from 18 RCDII patients. they also analyzed three RCDII cell lines.

    They also conducted phenotypical analysis on IELs isolated from biopsies taken from RCDII patients.

    They found that aberrant IELs showed an increased expression of granzyme B, along with a reduced expression of PCNA. Biopsies of RCDII patients showed heterogenic TCR rearrangements in the aberrant IEL cells. The researchers suggest that this is likely due to a variation in maturity. Similarly, RCDII cell lines showed a heterogenic TCR rearrangement pattern.

    From their data, the team concludes that aberrant IELs originate from deranged immature T lymphocytes and show clear differentiation to a cytotoxic phenotype.

    Among RCDII patients, aberrant IELs showed different stages of maturity, and only the patients who had the most mature aberrant IEL cells developed an EATL.

    Source:


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--audreyjm529
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    Guest Brian Ferry

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    Thanks for this. But do you think you could write this more in layman's terms?

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    Guest gluten

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    All I know is that I was in lots of pain. Stomach cramps, pains all over, bad headaches, and exhausted! I was so sick and tired that it became hard to get out of bed in the morning.

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    Thanks for this. But do you think you could write this more in layman's terms?

    My thoughts exactly.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams

    The following post is from Dr. Joseph Murray, one of the leading USA physicians in the diagnosis of celiac disease (celiac disease) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Dr. Murray (murray.joseph@mayo.edu) of the Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, is a gastroenterologist who specializes in treating Celiac disease:
    A recent poster asked about refractory celiac disease. This is a highly complex area and is the most challenging in dealing with celiac disease. While refractory celiac disease can be defined as a patient with celiac disease whose symptoms do not respond to a gluten-free diet there are several important questions and issues in coming to the determination that the patient is really suffering from true refractory disease. To make the diagnosis conclusively, first one must be satisfied that there is not another cause for the problem. Though rare, there are other conditions that can mimic, or coexist with celiac disease, and cause continued problems. The second issue is whether the patient is truly gluten-free, and have they been so long enough to conclude that there has been a failure with the diet? To make this determination I have the patient keep a complete and detailed dietary record for 3-4 weeks listing every single item they ate and have them save the wrapper or carton for review. If the dietitian or myself feel that there is any possibility of contamination then we exclude that item and wait longer. Sometimes the patient is exposed to a higher risk of gluten contamination by eating out a lot, where they do not have true control over the food preparation. We also check medications that the patient takes regularly. I also check the endomysial antibodies and gliadin antibodies. These should be negative if the patient has been gluten free for at least 6 months. The gliadin IgG may persist longer but usually its levels drop. If these are positive, this makes me think that they have had significant gluten in the diet in the recent past (Note: there still may be gluten in the diet if the test is negative). The original and follow-up biopsies should be compared to see if there has been any improvement. Assuming that these criteria are met, then one can proceed to consider the patient to have refractory disease. At that point it is important to check for complications such as lymphoma, lymphocyctic colitis and possibly pancreatic insufficiency. I treat the patient with a course of antibiotics and consider adding in pancreatic supplements to see if that will help the patients symptoms. It is only at this point that I consider some suppression of the immune system, such as with steroids or some other agent. Rarely will the patient be so ill that one must accelerate the decision to treat with steroids. Steroids are powerful medicines that can be very helpful, and even lifesaving in many cases, but have attendant risks that should be discussed prior to use. This is not medical advice and should not be used as such.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/28/2009 - A team of researchers recently set out to compare continual monitoring of intraepithelial lymphocyte immunophenotype and clonality against snapshot analysis in the surveillance of refractory celiac disease. The research team was made up of H. Liu, R. Brais, A. Lavergne-Slove, Q. Jeng, K. Payne K, H. Ye, Z. Liu, J. Carreras, Y. Huang, C. M. Bacon, R. Hamoudi, V. Save, L. Venkatraman, P. G. Isaacson, J. Woodward, and M. Q. Du of Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK.
    Often, people with refractory celiac disease suffer from abnormal immunophenotype and monoclonality of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). No good studies have been done to compare the utility of continual monitoring of IEL immunophenotype and clonality in monitoring refractory celiac disease (RCD).
    To address this deficiency, and to gather some data for comparison, the team used CD3e/CD8 double immunohistochemistry and PCR-based clonality analysis of the rearranged TCR genes to evaluate diagnostic and follow-up biopsies from 33 people with proven celiac disease, 7 with suspected refractory celiac disease, 41 with proven refractory celiac disease, and 20 with enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (including 11 evolved from RCD).
    The team found aberrant immunophenotype (CD3epsilon(+)CD8(-) IEL >/=40%) and monoclonality in occasional celiac disease biopsies, either transiently in celiac patients not following a gluten free diet, or in those who later developed refractory celiac disease, suspected RCD, or enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). By comparison, they found aberrant immunophenotype and monoclonality respectively in 30 of 41 (73%) and 24 of 37 (65%) biopsies at the time of diagnosis for refractory celiac disease.
    Among the patients with refractory celiac disease showed no such abnormalities in their diagnostic biopsies, 8 of 10 (80%) and 5 of 11 (45%) cases showed aberrant immunophenotype and monoclonality respectively upon follow-up. Whether found in initial or follow-up biopsies, the ongoing development of both aberrant immunophenotype and monoclonality is a common facet of refractory celiac disease.
    One key point was that the presence of both persistent monoclonality and aberrant immunophenotype, especially <>/=>80% CD3epsilon(+)CD8(-) IEL, was a strong predictor of enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma development in patients with RCD (P=0.001).
    From these findings, the team found concludes that the continual monitoring of both immunophenotype and clonality of IEL is superior to snapshot analysis for diagnosis and follow-up of refractory celiac disease, and could provide a useful tool for surveillance of patients at risk of developing EATL.
    Source:
    Gut. 2009 Dec 8.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/22/2010 - A recent evaluation of the safety and efficacy of small intestinal release mesalamine (SIRM) for symptom relief in refractory celiac disease (RCD) shows that SIRM seems to be a safe and effective treatment option, though larger tests are needed to know for certain.
    The research team conducting the evaluation included Shailaja Jamma, MD, Daniel A. Leffler, MD, Melinda Dennis, RD, Robert M. Najarian, MD, Detlef B. Schuppan, MD, Sunil Sheth, MD, and Ciaran P. Kelly, MD,
    They set out to evaluate the safety and efficacy of small intestinal release mesalamine (SIRM) for symptom relief in refractory celiac disease.
    There are currently no adequate clinical therapies for patients with refractory celiac disease and corticosteroid and/or immunosuppressants treatments are of limited use due to side effects. SIRM has been shown to reduce local inflammation, and it is well tolerated.
    For the study, the team looked at records of the refractory celiac disease patients who received SIRM in an open-label therapeutic trial. Data included patient demographics, disease characteristics, dose and duration of SIRM therapy, and patient response.
    The team then categorized each response as complete, if symptoms resolved completely, partial if symptoms improved at least 50%, and non-responsive if symptoms improved less than 50%.
    The team treated four patients with SIRM alone and six patients with a combination of SIRM and oral budesonide. After four weeks, half of the patients showed complete response, while 10% showed a partial response. Two of the six patients were able to discontinue budesonide. One patient discontinued SIRM after complaining of headaches.
    These initial results indicate that SIRM seems to be a safe and efficacious treatment option in patients with refractory celiac disease, though a larger, more comprehensive study is needed to confirm these results.
    Source:

    J Clin Gastroenterol 2010 Sep 24. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0b013e3181f42401


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/25/2011 - A group of researchers recently set out to evaluate cladribine [2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA)] therapy in refractory celiac disease (RCD) â…¡.
    The team included Greetje J. Tack, Wieke H. M. Verbeek, Abdul Al-Toma, Dirk J. Kuik, Marco W. J. Schreurs, Otto Visser, Chris J. J. Mulder of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology,  at VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Between 2000 and 2010, the research team conducted an open-label cohort-study of RCD â…¡ patients treated with 2-CdA. They assessed survival rate, enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL) occurrence, clinical course, and histological and immunological response rates.
    The study followed a total of  32 patients over an average 31-month period. Eighteen patients responded well to 2-CdA. Patients responsive to 2-CdA showed markedly higher survival rates, compared to unresponsive patients.
    The responder group showed an 83% survival rate at the 3- and 5-year mark, compared to rates of 63% and 22% in the non-responder group. The responder group showed an 81% clinical, histological and immunological response rates at the 2-year mark, compared to rates of 47% and 41% in the non-responder group. 16% of non-responsive patients progressed into EATL, and all of these patients died.
    Because 2-CdA shows excellent clinical and histological response rates, and probably less frequent transition into EATL, it looks like a promising treatment for RCD II.
    Source:

    World J Gastroenterol. 2011 January 28; 17(4): 506–513. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i4.506.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/21/2012 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a severe complication of celiac disease that occurs when symptoms and intestinal damage continue even when the patient adopt a gluten-free diet. Refractory celiac disease marked by abnormal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) of unknown origin that display an atypical CD3(-)CD7(+)icCD3(+) phenotype. About 40% of patients with RCDII lymphocytes develop a dangerous and invasive lymphoma.
    A team of researchers recently sought to identify possible origins of abnormal intraepithelial lymphocytes in refractory celiac disease type II.
    The research team included F. Schmitz; T.M. Tjon, Y. Lai; A. Thompson; Y. Kooy-Winkelaar; R.J. Lemmers; H.W. Verspaget; M.L. Mearin; F.J. Staal; M.W. Schreurs; T. Cupedo; A.W. Langerak; C.J. Mulder; J. van Bergen; and F. Koning.
    In their study, the researches sought to find the physiological counterpart of these abnormal intraepithelial lymphocytes cells.
    To do so, they used microarray analysis, real-time quantitative PCR and flow cytometry to compare RCDII cell lines with T-cell receptor positive (TCR(+)) IEL (T-IEL) lines. They then used their data to identify cells with an RCDII-associated phenotype in duodenal biopsies from non-refractory individuals by multicolor flow cytometry.
    They found that RCDII cell lines were distinct from T-IEL lines and showed higher levels of multiple natural killer (NK) cell receptors.
    In addition to the CD3(-)CD7(+)icCD3(+) phenotype, the RCDII lines showed an absence of CD56, CD127 and CD34, compared with other lymphocyte subsets.
    Moreover, they found cells matching this surface lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD7(+)CD127(-)CD34(-) phenotype that showed a functional interleukin-15 (IL-15) receptor and comprised a substantial portion of IELs in duodenal specimens of patients without celiac disease, particularly children. They also found cells of this kind in the thymus.
    For patients without celiac disease, the Lin(-)CD7(+)CD127(-)CD34(-) subset was one of four subsets within the CD3(-)CD7(+)icCD3(+) population that showed a differential expression of CD56 and/or CD127.
    The results indicate that the CD3(-)CD7(+)icCD3(+) population is heterogeneous and show the existence of a Lin(-) subset that is different from T, B, NK and lymphoid tissue inducer cells.
    The team hypothesizes that the IL-15 cells are the counterpart of abnormal cells that are expanded in RCDII and transformed in RCDII-associated lymphoma.
    Source:
    Gut. 2012 Jul 6.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/25/2012 - Abnormal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) are the main feature of refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII). However, researchers still don't know exactly how these abnormal IELs originate.
    A pair of researchers recently commented on efforts to learn how these abnormal IELs might come about.
    The pair were Victor F. Zevallos, and Detlef Schuppan, of the center for Molecular and Translational Medicine, Department of Medicine I at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, in Mainz, Germany.
    Their commentary focuses on efforts by a separate research team, Schmitz, et al., which had already used a broad spectrum of cell specific markers, RNA array and immunological techniques, to explore abnormal IEL cell lines from four RCDII patients, and compare them with IELs from the fetal intestine, the intestine of children and adults and the thymus.
    IELs are highly varied lymphocytes cells with innate and adaptive features that live in the small and large intestine. IELs play an important role in maintaining gut tolerance to common food antigens versus defense against pathogens.
    A number of nutritional factors influence the development and spread of IELs, especially vitamins and their active metabolites, such as retinoic acid, and phytochemicals such as ligands of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor from cruciferous vegetables.
    However, when IELs activate and expand uncontrollably in response to chronic inflammatory conditions in the gut, they trigger mucosal damage, which can lead to celiac disease, and in some cases, to malignant cancers.
    Up to 5% of people with celiac disease, especially those who are over fifty years old when diagnosed, continue to suffer from clinical symptoms and villous atrophy even when following a gluten-free diet.
    After excluding ongoing gluten consumption and other potential underlying diseases, all four patients studied by Schmitz could be diagnosed with RCD, which is classically classified as type I or type II, based on the histological co-expression of CD3 and CD8 in RCDI, or absence of such co-expression in RCDII.
    Read the entire report in Gut.
    Source:
    Gut doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2012-303030

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/12/2014 - Researchers and clinicians consider refractory celiac disease (RCD) to be rare, but they don't actually have solid, reliable information about how common the condition actually is.
    A team of researches recently set out to establish rates of refractory celiac disease, and to identify corresponding risk factors in a Finnish population with high rates of clinically diagnosed celiac disease.
    The research team included T. Ilus, K. Kaukinen, L. J. Virta, H. Huhtala, M. Mäki, K. Kurppa, M. Heikkinen, M. Heikura, E. Hirsi, K. Jantunen, V. Moilanen, C. Nielsen, M. Puhto, H. Pölkki, I. Vihriälä, and P. Collin.
    For their study, the team looked at data on 44 treated RCD patients, 12,243 clinically diagnosed celiac disease patients, and a compared results against a control group of 1.7 million adult inhabitants.
    Specifically, the team compared clinical characteristics upon celiac disease diagnosis between the RCD patients and patients with uncomplicated disease.
    RCD affected 0.31% of diagnosed celiac disease patients, but just 0.002% in the general population.
    Of the enrolled 44 RCD patients, 68% showed type I RCD, 23% type II RCD, and 9% remained undetermined.
    Compared with the 886 patients with uncomplicated celiac disease, the 44 patients who developed RCD later in life were, when first diagnosed for celiac disease, significantly older (median 56 vs 44 years, P < 0.001), more likely to be male (41% vs. 24%, P = 0.012) and largely seronegative (30% vs. 5%, P < 0.001).
    More patients with evolving RCD showed severe symptoms upon celiac disease diagnosis, including weight loss in 36% (vs. 16%, P = 0.001) and diarrhea in 54% (vs. 38%, P = 0.050).
    These results show that refractory celiac disease is very rare in the general population.
    However, patients who are male, older, who experience severe symptoms or seronegativity when first diagnosed with celiac disease have a higher risk of developing refractory celiac disease. These patients should be closely monitored over time..
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics Volume 39, Issue 4, pages 418–425, February 2014. DOI: 10.1111/apt.12606

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/07/2014 - Histologically non-responsive celiac disease (NRCD) is a potentially serious condition found in celiac disease patients who suffer persistent villous atrophy despite following a gluten-free diet (GFD).
    Currently, the only way to monitor patient progress rely on invasive and costly serial duodenal biopsies. Looking for better options, a team of researchers recently set out to identify antibody biomarkers for celiac disease patients that do not respond to traditional therapy.
    The research team included B. N. Spatola, K. Kaukinen, P. Collin, M. Mäki, M. F. Kagnoff, and P. S. Daugherty. They are affiliated with the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara in California, the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery and the Center for Child Health Research at the University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland, with the Department of Medicine at Seinäjoki Central Hospital in Seinäjoki, Finland, and with the Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology in the Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of California San Diego in La Jolla, California.
    Using flow cytometry to screen bacterial display peptide libraries, the team was able to identify the epitopes specifically recognized by antibodies from patients with NRCD, but not by antibodies from responsive celiac disease patients.
    By comparing ELISA results for sera from 15 NRCD patients and 45 patients with responsive celiac disease, all on a strict GFD for at least 1 year, the team confirmed that deamidated gliadin was the antigen mimicked by library peptides.
    They identified the dominant consensus epitope sequence by unbiased library screening QPxx(A/P)FP(E/D). The epitope sequence was highly similar to reported deamidated gliadin peptide (dGP) B-cell epitopes.
    They also found that anti-dGP IgG measurement by ELISA discriminated between NRCD and responsive celiac disease patients with 87% sensitivity and 89% specificity.
    Most importantly, they found that dGP antibody levels correlated with the severity of mucosal damage, meaning that IgG dGP levels may be useful in monitoring small intestinal mucosal recovery on a GFD in NCRD patients.
    The team found that celiac patients with NRCD can be spotted by their increased levels of anti-dGP IgG antibodies even when the patients are following strict gluten-free diets
    Lastly, they feel that anti-dGP IgG assays may be useful for monitoring mucosal damage and histological improvement in celiac disease patients on a strict GFD.
    Source:
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2014;39(4):407-417.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/17/2015 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) and EATL (Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma) are pre-malignant complications of celiac disease. However, there is scant medical literature and data what role malnutrition and intestinal absorption may play in these conditions.
    With this in mind, a team of researchers set out to conduct a comprehensive assessment of nutritional status and intestinal absorption capacity of patients with RCDII and EATL, and to compare that with data of newly diagnosed celiac disease patients. The research team included N.J. Wierdsma, P. Nijeboer, M.A. de van der Schueren, M. Berkenpas, A.A. van Bodegraven, and C.J. Mulder.
    They are affiliated with the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Department of Gastroenterology, the Celiac Centre Amsterdam, the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics at VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands; and with the Department of Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology and Geriatrics at ATRIUM-ORBIS Medical Centre, Sittard, The Netherlands.
    They conducted an observational study in tertiary care setting in for 24 RCDII patients, averaging 63.8 ± 8.2 years of age, 25 EATL patients averaging 62.3 ± 5.7 years of age, and 43 celiac disease patients averaging 45.6 ± 14.8 years of age.
    At diagnosis, the team evaluated anthropometry (BMI, unintentional weight loss, fat-free mass index (FFMI), handgrip strength (HGS), nutritional intake, fecal losses and Resting Energy Expenditure (REE)).
    They found low BMI (<18.5) more often in RCDII patients than in celiac disease or EATL patients (in 33%, 12% and 12%, respectively, p = 0.029). Also, 58% of EATL patients had unintentional weight loss greater than 10% of total weight, compared to 19% of celiac disease patients, and 39% for RCDII patients (p = 0.005/0.082).
    The team found energy malabsorption (below 85%) in 44% of RCDII patients, and in 33% of EATL patients, compared with 21.6% in celiac disease (NS).
    Fecal energy losses were higher in RCDII than in celiac disease patients (589 ± 451 vs 277 ± 137 kcal/d, p = 0.017). REE was lower than predicted, with reulst greater than 10% in 60% of RCDII, 89% of EATL, and 38% of celiac disease patients (p = 0.006).
    Between one third and two thirds of all patients showed Low FFMI and HGS.
    Patients with RCDII and EATL show far worse nutritional profiles than untreated naïve celiac disease patients at presentation. This malnutrition is at least partly due to malabsorption as well as hypermetabolism.
    This study shows the importance of proper diagnosis, and of nutrition in the treatment of these conditions.
    Source:
     Clin Nutr. 2015 Apr 30. pii: S0261-5614(15)00124-7. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2015.04.014.

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    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
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    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
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    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com