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    Schizophrenia Linked to Celiac Disease and Other Autoimmune Diseases


    Scott Adams


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    American Journal of Psychiatry 163:521-528, March 2006

    Celiac.com 03/14/2006 – Danish researchers have found yet another link between celiac disease and schizophrenia. In a large epidemiologic study the researchers looked at 7,704 Danish people who were diagnosed with schizophrenia between 1981 and 1998, including their parents, and matched them to comparison control subjects. The data linkage required that the autoimmune disease be diagnosed before the diagnosis of schizophrenia. The researchers found that patients with a history of an autoimmune disease had a 45% increased risk for schizophrenia, and nine autoimmune disorders were indicators of a higher prevalence for schizophrenia when compared to the controls. The researchers conclude: “Schizophrenia is associated with a larger range of autoimmune diseases than heretofore suspected. Future research on co-morbidity has the potential to advance understanding of pathogenesis of both psychiatric and autoimmune disorders.”

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    Guest Lisa Hamner

    Posted

    The magnitude of the possibility of a known cause/cure for schizophrenia is a completely different iceberg.

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    This is nonsense. I'm sick of this garbage about mental illness. These technocrats are always trying to link it to a legitimate illness like celiac disease or CFS/ME/Fibro so that providers are encouraged to diagnose a mental illness in lieu of screening for celiac disease. It's cheaper as long as they control for the risk.

     

     

    I myself was diagnosed with schizophrenia by a primary care physician. I do *NOT* have hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, disorganized manner speech.

     

     

    But even though I was negative for those hallmark symptoms, my provider still went ahead and diagnosed me with schizophrenia because I had told her that I was misdiagnosed for decades with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

     

     

    She told me that it was possible to have both bowel disease and mental illness. But I told her that I simply did not trust doctors because of the cover ups.

     

     

    She then diagnosis me with autism! But she clarified that it was only around healthcare providers.

     

     

    Oh, and of course she finished off the slander with "anosognosia" because I refused to undergo psychological treatment.

     

     

    Talk about a conflict of interest! She works alongside psychologists and psychiatrists. It makes you wonder if there are quotas at that place for referrals. Her boss said I could no longer be seen unless I went ahead with the referral. Then a security guard of cop came and removed me from the building. He even watched my car as I drove away. He then reported back to someone within the facility on his walkie talky.

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    Guest Shelly

    Posted

    This is nonsense. I'm sick of this garbage about mental illness. These technocrats are always trying to link it to a legitimate illness like celiac disease or CFS/ME/Fibro so that providers are encouraged to diagnose a mental illness in lieu of screening for celiac disease. It's cheaper as long as they control for the risk.

     

     

    I myself was diagnosed with schizophrenia by a primary care physician. I do *NOT* have hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, disorganized manner speech.

     

     

    But even though I was negative for those hallmark symptoms, my provider still went ahead and diagnosed me with schizophrenia because I had told her that I was misdiagnosed for decades with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

     

     

    She told me that it was possible to have both bowel disease and mental illness. But I told her that I simply did not trust doctors because of the cover ups.

     

     

    She then diagnosis me with autism! But she clarified that it was only around healthcare providers.

     

     

    Oh, and of course she finished off the slander with "anosognosia" because I refused to undergo psychological treatment.

     

     

    Talk about a conflict of interest! She works alongside psychologists and psychiatrists. It makes you wonder if there are quotas at that place for referrals. Her boss said I could no longer be seen unless I went ahead with the referral. Then a security guard of cop came and removed me from the building. He even watched my car as I drove away. He then reported back to someone within the facility on his walkie talky.

    ioprem - Sadly, your inability to "smile and nod" is the only "mental illness" one needs to have in order to receive a diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder. Next time you find yourself balking at the diagnoses made by a health care practitioner, smile and nod. You can't change their mind most likely; why waste your precious time trying? Dump them and move on. You will eventually find a provider who meets your needs.

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    Guest Tigger

    Posted

    There are other documented cases to support the connection. Our GMO hybrid wheat in the food chain is causing not just celiac disease but diabetes, spiking insulin, what feels like emotions is a chemical reaction. And there is a direct link to candida overgrowth that can cause irritable bowel syndrome. A few months after I went gluten and sugar-free, my irritable bowel syndrome and mood swings disappeared. If you haven't removed all forms of sugar, including starch and gluten from your diet, and are still having health issues, your closed mind will keep you sick.

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    The following was written by Dr. Kalle Reichelt who is a leading celiac disease researcher at the Pediatric Research Institute in Oslo, Norway. Please direct any questions regarding this article to him at: K.L.Reichelt@rh.uio.no
    What most people ignore is that both peptides and trace (biologically significant amounts) amounts of proteins are taken up across the gut mucosa (1,2). Because one molecule of gluten contains at least 15 opioid sequences it is quite clear that this could cause a problem. Increased peptide excretion is found in the urine of celiacs before treatment (3) (Reichelt et al in prep). This is confirmed by a series of papers that demonstrate intact food proteins in mothers milk (4-7). A Canadian group has confirmed that gluten does change a brain enzyme and monoamine levels in cats (8). Their findings a significant even though cats are not gluten eating animals. There is increasing evidence that components from food can indeed cause serious psychiatric (9-12) and neurological (13-16) diseases. Even rheumatoid arthritis may have a link to food proteins (17), and it well established that stress increases gut permeability. Nobody denies the possibility of reactive depression, but there is little reason why this could not be made worse by dietary factors. Because antibodies are indeed induced by peptides it may even be so that dietary peptides by mimicry to endogenous cell surface peptide sequences, may be responsible for many autoimmune diseases (18).
    References:
    Gardner MLG (1994) Physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Edit: LR Johnson. Raven press 3rd edit. pp 1795-1820. Husby S et al (1985) Scand J Immunol 22:83-92. Klosse JA et al (1972) Clin Chim Acta 42:409-422. Kilshaw PJ and Cant AJ (1984) Inter. Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 75:8-15. Axelsson I et al (1986) Acta paed Scand 75:702-707. Stuart CA et al (1984) Clin Allergy 14:533-535. Troncone R et al (1987) Acta paed Scand 76:453-456. Thibault L et al (1988) J Clin Biochem Nutr. 4:209-221. Hallert C et al (1982) Psychic disturbances in adult celiac disease III.Reduced central monoamine metabolism and signs of depression. Scand J Gastroenterol 17:25-28. Singh MM and Kay SR (1976) Wheat gluten as a pthogenic factor in schizophrenia. Science 191:401-402. Dohan FC and Grasberger JC (1973) relapsed schizophrenics: earlier discharge from the hospital after cereal-free, milk-free diet. Amer J Psychiat 130:685-686. Reichelt KL et al (1990) The effect of gluten free diet on glycoprotein attached urinary peptidee excretion and behaviour in schizophrenics. J Orthomol Med 5:223-239. Gobbi G et al (1992) Celiac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcifications. The Lancet 340:439-443. Paul K-D et al (1985) EEG-Befunde Zoeliakikranken Kindern in Abh{ngigkkeit von der Ern{hrung. Z Klin Med 40:707-709. Kahn A et al (1987) Difficulty of initiating sleep associated with cows milk allergy in infants. Sleep 10:116-121. Hadjivassiliou M et al (1996) Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? The Lancet 347:369-371. Kjeldsen-Kragh J et al (1991) Controlled trial of fasting and one-year vegetarian diet in rheumatoid arthritis. The Lancet 338:899-902. Karjalainen J et al (1992) Bovine albumin peptide as a possible trigger of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. New Eng J Med 327:302-307.

    Scott Adams
    George Von Hilsheimer, 1977
    (Celiac.com 06/12/2000) A way the hypothalamic choreographer might be deranged is by malabsorption syndrome. If this suggestion is valid it directly leads to some simple therapeutic guidelines and implications for inexpensive and productive research - I suggest that malabsorption syndrome is a whole complex of metabolic disorders which interact with psychosocial stress, infection, allergies and endocrine disorders. Malabsorption is a stressor in itself...
    ...Malabsorption is associated with high levels of circulating adrenocortocotrophic hormone (ACTH) and with high levels of acetylcholine (ACh). ACTH and ACh are in turn associated with modes of learning which are characterized by poor habituation (the animals do not learn or unlearn well), by high levels of avoidance, by efficient escape conditioning, by neophobia and by poor instrumental conditioning. The experimental evidence suggests that children with malabsorption will often be similar in their electrophysiological and conditioning patterns to animals with lesions to the hypothalamus and to the hippocampus. (Di SantAgnese & Jones, 1962.)...
    ...Many authors have remarked on the similarity of the symptoms of sprue and celiac disease to schizophrenia (Dohan, 1969). Abnormal levels of hydrochloric acid in the stomach are associated with hysteria and neurosis (Hepler, 1970). The classic celiac syndrome is said to occur in about one case in every two thousand patients seen by pediatricians, and there is a similar frequency of nontropical sprue in adults. However, one authority (Hodgkin, 1973) reported seeing only one case of celiac disease and no sprue in ten years on a British National Health Service with 2500 patients. My own experience is that many physicians are reluctant to diagnose celiac disease and that the variability of its frequency as a diagnosis may be even greater than that among expert clinicians diagnosing diabetes from laboratory results (viz. from 2 to 76%. Jarrett & Keen (1976)...
    ...Consequences of Malabsorption:
    The ecology of the gut would be poor; Imbalances in blood chemistries and developmental anomalies would indicate neonatal and fetal nutritional inadequacy; The adrenal glands would be depleted; The immune system would be over reactive... ...Evidence for Malnutrition in Middle Class Delinquents
    Summarizing the preliminary reports reviewed above and looking at my delinquents in their light suggest that compared to other children:
    Delinquents are more often products of unfortunate pregnancies; They suffer more pregnancy and birth complications; They are seldom breast fed; They have more colic and other early indications of GI distress and food intolerance; They are often victims of celiac syndrome and other inborn errors of metabolism; They are early addicted to diets high in sugar and refined carbohydrates; They have poor absorption of food deficient intestinal flora, and slow transit times for food products moving through their guts; They have thiamin, pyridoxine and pantothenic acid deficiencies as neonates. These facts suggest that delinquents are at high risk for unusual CNS development, CNS damage, poor continuing synthesis of CNS amino acids and neural transmitters, and are extremely vulnerable to derangements of the immune and allergy systems...
    ...Criminal, felon (schizophrenics), and chronic patients had the greatest evidence of malabsorption syndrome of all the subjects, who generally evidenced malabsorption. Felon (schizophrenic) had lower hair Cu than (schizophrenic) patients who were not actively delinquent...

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2003 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Evolution is an interactive process. Those of us who learn quickly and well are more likely to survive, thrive, and reproduce. Learning capacities then, are factors in the survival of our genes. Research is now revealing that cereal grains, along with other allergenic and highly glycemic foods, pose a serious threat to our sustained ability to learn. These foods have been shown to interfere at almost any stage of the learning process, impeding our attempts to focus our attention, observe, ponder, remember, understand, and apply that understanding. Grains can alter learning capacities in four specific ways: as sequelae of untreated celiac disease; through an immune sensitivity to gluten; through dietary displacement of other nutrients and; through the impact of grain on blood sugar/insulin levels.
    There are many reports of learning problems in association with untreated celiac disease. A majority of children with celiac disease display the signs and symptoms of attention deficit disorder (ADD/ADHD)1, 2 a range of learning difficulties3 and developmental delays4-6. Many of the same problems are found more frequently among those with gluten sensitivity7 a condition signaled by immune reactions against this most common element of the modern diet. Grain consumption can also cause specific nutrient deficiencies that are known to play an important role in learning. Grains can also cause problems with blood sugar/insulin levels resulting in reduced capacities for learning. Further, foods derived from grain are an important element in the current epidemic of hypoglycemia, obesity, and Type 2 diabetes8-10. Our growing understanding of the biological impact of cereal grain consumption must move educators to challenge current dietary trends.
    Part of our improved understanding comes from new testing protocols which are revealing that celiac sprue afflicts close to 1% of the general population, making it the most common life-long ailment among humans, with frequencies ranging from 0.5% to more than 5% of some populations11, 12. It is widespread and appears to occur more frequently among populations that have experienced relatively shorter periods of exposure to these grains13. The importance of this newly recognized high frequency of celiac disease becomes obvious when we examine the impact it has on learning and behavior.
    Research has identified ADHD in 66-70% of children with untreated celiac disease, which resolves on a gluten-free diet, and returns with a gluten challenge1, 2. Several investigators have connected particular patterns of reduced blood flow to specific parts of the brain in ADHD13-15. Other reports have connected untreated celiac disease with similarly abnormal blood flow patterns in the brain16. One might be able to dismiss such reports if viewed in isolation, but the increased rates of learning disabilities among celiac patients3, and the increased rates of celiac disease among those with learning disabilities leave little to the imagination17. Further, there is one report of gluten-induced aphasia (a condition characterized by the loss of speech ability) that resolved after diagnosis and institution of a gluten-free diet18. Still other investigations suggest a causal link between the partial digests of gluten (opioid peptides) and a variety of problems with learning, attention, and development.
    Gluten sensitivity, afflicting close to 15% of the general population19, 20 is an immune reaction to one or more proteins in found in grains. When a persons immune system has developed antibodies against any of these proteins, undigested and partly digested food particles have been allowed entry into the bloodstream21. The leakage of food proteins through the intestinal wall signals a failure of the protective, mucosal lining of the gastrointestinal tract, as is consistently found in untreated celiac disease. Many of the same health and learning problems that are found in celiac disease are significantly overrepresented among those with gluten sensitivity for the very good reason that many of the same proteins are being leaked into the blood of those with gluten sensitivity.
    Our cultural obeisance to grains is at odds with the remains of ancient humans. Archaeologists have long recognized that grains are a starvation food—one for which we are not well suited. Grains result in consistent signs of disease and malnourishment in every locale and epoch associated with human adoption of grain cultivation.
    Grains are a poverty food. As we increase our grain consumption, we cause deficiencies in other nutrients by overwhelming the absorptive and transport mechanisms at work in our intestines. For instance, diets dominated by grains have been shown to induce iron deficiency22—a condition that is widely recognized as causing learning disabilities23-29. This should not be surprising since iron is the carrier used to distribute oxygen throughout our bodies, including various regions of our brains. There is little room to dispute the hazards to learning posed by reductions in oxygen supply to the brain. Iron deficiency reduces available oxygen in the brain, revealing yet another dimension of gluten grains as mediators of learning difficulties.
    There is more. The impact of grain consumption on our blood sugar levels is yet another facet of its contribution to learning problems. We evolved as hunter-gatherers, eating meats, and complex carbohydrates in the form of fruits, vegetables, and seeds. Refined sugars were a rare treat wrested from bees with some difficulty. At best, it was a rare treat for our pre-historic ancestors.
    Today, with unprecedented agricultural/industrial production of refined sugars along with cultivation and milling of grain flours, these products have become very cheap and available, particularly over the last fifty years. During that time, we have added enormous quantities of grain-derived starches to the overwhelming quantities of sugar we consume. The result of this escalating dietary trend may be observed in the current epidemic rates of Type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. In the classroom, we see these trends manifest in students mood swings, behavioral disorders (fluctuating between extreme lethargy and hyperactivity), chronic depression, forgetfulness, and muddled thinking—all of which reflects the inordinate, counter-evolutionary burden placed on many homeostatic systems of the body, particularly those related to blood sugar regulation.
    The pancreas has many functions. One important activity of the pancreas is to stabilize blood sugar levels. When blood sugar is not well regulated, learning is impaired30. The pancreas secretes carefully monitored quantities of glucagon and insulin. The pancreas responds to the presence of proteins, sugar, and starch in the digestive tract by producing insulin. It produces glucagon in response to fats. The balanced presence of both of these hormones in the bloodstream is critical to learning because they regulate the transport of nutrients into cells. Too little or too much insulin can cause blood sugar levels go out of control inducing a wide range of symptoms.
    Today, when the insulin/glucagon balance goes awry, it is frequently due to insulin overproduction due to a diet dominated by sugars and starches. This overproduction is caused by chronic consumption of highly glycemic foods. The resulting elevated levels of insulin cause rapid movement of nutrients into cells, either for storage as fat, or to be burned as energy, causing increased activity levels, "hot spells", sweating, increased heart rate, etc. This energized stage requires a constant supply of sugars and starches to be maintained. Otherwise, it is soon followed by bouts of lethargy, light-headedness, tremors, and weakness, which are all signs of hypoglycemia or very low blood sugar levels.
    Despite having stored much of the blood sugars as fats, there is insufficient glucagon to facilitate its use for energy. As this condition progresses, and as blood sugar levels plummet, periods of irrational anger and/or confusion often result. These moods often result from adrenaline secreted to avoid a loss of consciousness due to low blood sugar levels. The next step in the progression, in the absence of appropriate nutritional intervention, is lapsing into a coma.
    In the short term, the answer to these fluctuations is more frequent consumption of sugars/starches. However, the long term result of such an approach is either a state of insulin resistance, where more and more insulin is required to do the same task, or a state of pancreatic insufficiency, where the pancreas is simply unable to keep pace with the demand for insulin. In either case, once this stage is reached, the individual may be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This disease has so increased among North Americans, particularly among children, that an autoimmune form of diabetes, previously called juvenile onset, had to be renamed to "Type 1 diabetes".
    By now, it will not surprise the reader to learn that Type 1 diabetes has also been shown to be significantly associated with gluten. Research reveals that there is considerable overlap between celiac disease and Type 1 diabetes. About 8% of celiacs also have Type 1 diabetes31-33, and 5-11% of Type 1 diabetics have celiac disease34-38. Further, Scott Frazer et al. have repeatedly shown, in animal studies, a causal, dose-dependent relationship between type 1 diabetes and gluten39-42.
    The growing reaction against gluten and other allergenic foods should not be confused with the several dietary fads of the 20th Century. The vegetarian perspective ignores the vitamin deficiencies that result from a strict vegetarian diet. The low-fat craze is another fad that has mesmerized the industrialized world for the last 30-40 years. Fortunately, this perspective has recently come under scrutiny. Despite having served as the driving force behind most physicians dietary recommendations during the last several decades, the low fat dictum is overwhelmingly being discredited by research reported in peer reviewed publications.
    Recognition and avoidance of allergenic and highly glycemic foods is a whole new trend that is based on scientific research and evidence. It reflects an improved understanding of the function of the gastrointestinal tract, the endocrine system, particularly the pancreas, and the immune system. Past dietary fads are consistently deficient in important nutrients that are necessary to our good health and survival. Further, they frequently contain substances that are harmful to us, such as the phytates that are abundantly present in whole grain foods, and interfere with absorption of many minerals.
    It is increasingly clear that grains, especially those that contain gluten, are contraindicated for human learning. The evidence is overwhelming. The mandate of eating to learn is learning to eat as our ancestors did.
    Ron Hoggan is an author, teacher and diagnosed celiac who lives in Canada. His book "Dangerous Grains" can be ordered here.
    References:
    Kozlowska, Z: (1991). Results of investigation on children with coeliakia treated many years with glutethen free diet Psychiatria Polska. 25(2),130-134. Paul, K., Todt, J., Eysold, R. (1985) [EEG Research Findings in Children with Celiac Disease According to Dietary Variations]. Zeitschrift der Klinische Medizin. 40, 707-709. Grech, P.L., Richards, J., McLaren, S., Winkelman, J.H. (2000) Psychological sequelae and quality of life in celiac disease. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 31(3): S4 Reichelt, K., Sagedal, E., Landmark, J., Sangvic, B., Eggen, O., Helge, S. (1990a). The Effect of Gluten-Free Diet on Urinary peptide Excretion and Clinical State in Schizophrenia. Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine. 5(4), 169-181. Reichelt, K., Ekrem, J., Scott, H. (1990b). Gluten, Milk Proteins and Autism: DIETARY INTERVENTION EFFECTS ON BEHAVIOR AND PEPTIDE SECRETION. Journal of Applied Nutrition. 42(1), 1-11. Reichelt, K., Knivsberg, A., Lind, G., Nodland, M. (1991). Probable etiology and Possible Treatment of Childhood Autism. Brain Dysfunction. 4, 308-319. Hoggan, R. (1997a). Absolutisms Hidden Message for Medical Scientism. Interchange. 28(2/3), 183-189. Caterson ID, Gill TP. Obesity: epidemiology and possible prevention. Best Pract Res Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Dec;16(4):595-610. Hennessy AR, Walker JD.Silent hypoglycaemia at the diabetic clinic. Diabet Med. 2002 Mar;19(3):261. Kue Young T, Chateau D, Zhang M. Factor analysis of ethnic variation in the multiple metabolic (insulin resistance) syndrome in three Canadian populations.Am J Human Biol. 2002 Sep-Oct;14(5):649-58. Wahab PJ, Meijer JW, Dumitra D, Goerres MS, Mulder CJ. Coeliac disease: more than villous atrophy.Rom J Gastroenterol. 2002 Jun;11(2):121-7. Catassi C, Ratsch IM, Gandolfi L, Pratesi R, Fabiani E, El Asmar R, Frijia M, Bearzi I, Vizzoni L. Why is coeliac disease endemic in the people of the Sahara?Lancet. 1999 Aug 21;354(9179):647-8. Langleben DD, Acton PD, Austin G, Elman I, Krikorian G, Monterosso JR, Portnoy O, Ridlehuber HW, Strauss HW. Effects of Methylphenidate Discontinuation on Cerebral Blood Flow in Prepubescent Boys with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.J Nucl Med. 2002 Dec;43(12):1624-1629. 2: Kim BN, Lee JS, Shin MS, Cho SC, Lee DS. Regional cerebral perfusion abnormalities in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder Statistical parametric mapping analysis. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2002 Oct;252(5):219-25. Lou, H., Henriksen, L., Bruhn, P. (1984). Focal cerebral hypoperfusion in children with dysphasia and/or attention deficit disorder. Archives of Neurology. 825-829. De Santis A, Addolorato G, Romito A, Caputo S, Giordano A, Gambassi G, Taranto C, Manna R, Gasbarrini G. Schizophrenic symptoms and SPECT abnormalities in a coeliac patient: regression after a gluten-free diet. J Intern Med. 1997 Nov;242(5):421-3. Knivsberg AM. Urine patterns, peptide levels and IgA/IgG antibodies to food proteins in children with dyslexia.Pediatr Rehabil. 1997 Jan-Mar;1(1):25-33. Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia.N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48. Hadjivassiliou M, Boscolo S, Davies-Jones GA, Grunewald RA, Not T, Sanders DS, Simpson JE, Tongiorgi E, Williamson CA, Woodroofe NM. The humoral response in the pathogenesis of gluten ataxia. Neurology. 2002 Apr 23;58(8):1221-6. Hadjivassiliou M, Grunewald RA, Davies-Jones GA. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness.J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2002 May;72(5):560-3. Review. Husby, V., Jensenius, C., Svehag, S.(1985). Passage of Undegraded DietaryAntigen into the Blood of Healthy Adults. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology. 22, 83-92. Ma A, Chen X, Zheng M, Wang Y, Xu R, Li J. Iron status and dietary intake of Chinese pregnant women with anemia in the third trimester. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2002;11(3):171-5. Kapil U, Bhavna A. Adverse effects of poor micronutrient status during childhood and adolescence. Nutr Rev. 2002 May;60(5 Pt 2):S84-90. Review. Youdim MB, Yehuda S. The neurochemical basis of cognitive deficits induced by brain iron deficiency: involvement of dopamine-opiate system. Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 2000 May;46(3):491-500. Otero GA, Aguirre DM, Porcayo R, Fernandez T. Psychological and electroencephalographic study in school children with iron deficiency. Int J Neurosci. 1999 Aug;99(1-4):113-21. Guesry P. The role of nutrition in brain development. Prev Med. 1998 Mar-Apr;27(2):189-94. Review. Bruner AB, Joffe A, Duggan AK, Casella JF, Brandt J. Randomised study of cognitive effects of iron supplementation in non-anaemic iron-deficient adolescent girls. Lancet. 1996 Oct 12;348(9033):992-6. Soewondo S. The effect of iron deficiency and mental stimulation on Indonesian childrens cognitive performance and development. Kobe J Med Sci. 1995 Apr;41(1-2):1-17. McCarthy AM, Lindgren S, Mengeling MA, Tsalikian E, Engvall JC. Effects of diabetes on learning in children. Pediatrics. 2002 Jan;109(1):E9. Bertini M, Sbarbati A, Valletta E, Pinelli L, Tato L. Incomplete gastric metaplasia in children with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and celiac disease. An ultrastructural study.BMC Clin Pathol. 2001;1(1):2. Schuppan D, Hahn EG. Celiac disease and its link to type 1 diabetes mellitus.J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2001;14 Suppl 1:597-605. Holmes GK. Coeliac disease and Type 1 diabetes mellitus - the case for screening.Diabet Med. 2001 Mar;18(3):169-77. x Saukkonen T, Vaisanen S, Akerblom HK, Savilahti E. Coeliac disease in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a study of growth, glycaemic control, and experiences of families.Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(3):297-302. Spiekerkoetter U, Seissler J, Wendel U. General Screening for Celiac Disease is Advisable in Children with Type 1 Diabetes.Horm Metab Res. 2002 Apr;34(4):192-5. Barera G, Bonfanti R, Viscardi M, Bazzigaluppi E, Calori G, Meschi F, Bianchi C, Chiumello G. Occurrence of celiac disease after onset of type 1 diabetes: a 6-year prospective longitudinal study.Pediatrics. 2002 May;109(5):833-8. Hansen D, Bennedbaek FN, Hansen LK, Hoier-Madsen M, Hegedu LS, Jacobsen BB, Husby S. High prevalence of coeliac disease in Danish children with type I diabetes mellitus.Acta Paediatr. 2001 Nov;90(11):1238-43. Aktay AN, Lee PC, Kumar V, Parton E, Wyatt DT, Werlin SL. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of celiac disease in juvenile diabetes in Wisconsin.J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2001 Oct;33(4):462-5. MacFarlane AJ, Burghardt KM, Kelly J, Simell T, Simell O, Altosaar I, Scott FW. A type 1 diabetes-related protein from wheat (triticum aestivum): cDNA clone of a wheat storage globulin, Glb1, linked to islet damage.J Biol Chem. 2002 Oct 29. Scott FW, Rowsell P, Wang GS, Burghardt K, Kolb H, Flohe S. Oral exposure to diabetes-promoting food or immunomodulators in neonates alters gut cytokines and diabetes.Diabetes. 2002 Jan;51(1):73-8. Scott FW, Cloutier HE, Kleemann R, Woerz-Pagenstert U, Rowsell P, Modler HW, Kolb H. Potential mechanisms by which certain foods promote or inhibit the development of spontaneous diabetes in BB rats: dose, timing, early effect on islet area, and switch in infiltrate from Th1 to Th2 cells.Diabetes. 1997 Apr;46(4):589-98. Scott FW. Food-induced type 1 diabetes in the BB rat.Diabetes Metab Rev. 1996 Dec;12(4):341-59. Of Relevant interest:
    Gormanous M, Hunt A, Pope J, Gerald B. Lack of knowledge of diabetes among Arkansas public elementary teachers: implications for dietitians. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002 Aug;102(8):1136-8.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/29/2009 - A team of researchers based at UK's prospective University of Highlands and Islands (UHI) have found a link between gluten and schizophrenia. According to their latest findings, proteins found in the gluten of wheat, rye and barley might play a role in triggering schizophrenia in people with a genetic risk for the condition, or in worsening symptoms in people who have the disease.
    The research team has been looking into the role played by gluten in schizophrenia and diabetes, as well as hunting for connections between the two disorders. Their research showed that the bodies of certain schizophrenia sufferers could not properly processes gluten, which led to tissue damage.
    As a result of these and other findings, researchers now consider genetic risk factors, together with environmental triggers, to be central to development of both schizophrenia and diabetes. Gluten is one such example.
    According to senior researcher and reader in genetics, Dr. Jun Wei, more than one-third of all people with schizophrenia show "high levels of antibodies against wheat gluten," and may experience some improvement in symptoms with a gluten-free diet.
    Though the studies are still in their early stages, the hypothesis is encouraging, because, as noted by head of UHI department of diabetes and cardiovascular science, Prof Ian Megson, if it is correct, "a simple change in diet might prevent these diseases...in some individuals."
    The research is part of two comprehensive studies at UHI into the connections between schizophrenia and diabetes, and the role played by gluten, and is supported by a £300,000 grant from the Schizophrenia Association of Great Britain (SAGB).
    It would be interesting to see more research done on the connection between celiac disease and schizophrenia, as other studies have indicated that there is a link.

    Source: BBC News


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au