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    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Connection Found between Celiac Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 04/23/2007 - The results of a recent Dutch study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology have confirmed a connection between Hashimotos Thyroiditis and celiac disease.


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    In the study, 104 individuals with Hashimotos Thyroiditis were tested for immunoglobulin A anti-transglutaminase (tTG) antibodies, IgA anti-endomysial antibodies (EMA) and HLA-DQ typing. Those who tested positive for any of the serological tests were given an intestinal biopsy.

    Sixteen patients (15%) showed positive celiac serology and five patients clear villous atrophy were diagnosed with celiac disease (4.8%; 95% CI 0.7-8.9). All five patients diagnosed with celiac disease, and 53 patients with Hashimotos thyroiditis (50%; 95% CI 43-62), showed the presence of HLA-DQ2 (and/or -DQ8).

    In a separate test within the study, 184 Individuals with known celiac disease were given a serological test for thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase Antibodies, after first being given thyroid biochemical, a thyroxine-free thyroid stimulating hormone.

    39 patients (21%) showed positive thyroid serology. According to thyroid biochemistry results, ten patients showed euthyroidism (5%; 95% CI 2-9), seven showed sub-clinical hypothyroidism (3.8%; 95% CI 1.8-7.6), and 22 patients showed overt hypothyroidism, Hashimotos thyroiditis (12%; 95% CI 8-16). Furthermore, four patients with celiac disease had Graves disease (2%; 95% CI 0.8-5) and one patient had post-partum thyroiditis.

    The study concludes that there is a clear association between Hashimotos thyroiditis and celiac disease. Accordingly, it is recommended that patients with Hashimotos thyroiditis be screened for celiac disease and that patients with known celiac be screened for Hashimotos thyroiditis.

    World Journal of Gastroenterology 2007; 13(10).

    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.


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    Guest colleen pike

    Posted

    For years I have suffered with Hashimoto's and could not understand why I could not loose weight on the oroxine medication even though I exercise and am active. Do you think a Gluten free diet could help me as I am 59 years old?

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    I have antibodies in my thyroid so I did an IgG food allergy test which showed I was allergic to many things such as meats, lettuce, peaches and gluten in wheat. The doctor told me to not worry about the gluten for now but to try to get off the other foods that I a allergic to. I did that for 2 months and my antibody count went from 500's to 300's. I think normal is 0-14. Then I asked him if I should go off gluten. He said yes. I feel better without gluten. I have been off it for about a week.

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    Guest Elinor F. Skeate

    Posted

    Interesting...since I had Hashimoto's about the same time I started getting celiac problems, though it has taken me 20 years to get a diagnosis of celiac.

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    Guest angela

    Posted

    I have Hashimoto's and in my research have learned that anyone with this disease is gluten intolerant - as with many autoimmune diseases.

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    Excellent info. I want to add that if your thryoid tests are within normal range, and you then go off gluten, you will most likely lose weight. At this point, your medication dosage may be too high for your reduced body mass. It's very important to be re-checking your thyroid hormones if you lose weight or change your diet as you could veer into hyperthyroidism, which is what happened to me along with all the messy symptoms. Stay on top of this, please.

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    Guest Genece Warren

    Posted

    I was finally diagnosed with celiac eight years ago, after suffering for 15 years before being diagnosed. I am also lactose intolerant. I have just been diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease and am so grateful to confirm that there is a correlation between celiac and Hashimoto's. Thank you so much for validating my suspicion.

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    Guest HDugas

    Posted

    I was diagnosed with celiac three years ago and just recently my new doctor diagnosed me with hypothyroidism. She didn't specify Hashimoto's but it would make sense. I start on Synthroid today, so hopefully I'll start to feel better.

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    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's and Celiac's disease at the same time. I was 33 when I got my diagnosis. I just figured I was weird and had both issues, I am so glad (not really but you know what I mean) to see there are others out there like me!

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    I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's and within three months of being on Levothyroxine, I began to experience celiac symptoms. My TSH shot back up while on Levothyroxine which made me suspicious about my diet. I read somewhere that thyroid medication is absorbed in your lower intestines, and that is also where you find damage from gluten if gluten is a problem for you. So, if gluten is damaging your lower intestines, then your body cannot fully absorb the optimal thyroid dosage from the medication. I cut gluten and all my hypo symptoms went away and my TSH has begun to go down again. However, if I do slip on the gluten-free diet (because it's really hard to stay on if you don't have an immediate reaction) I notice that within days of eating a cluster of gluten, I start to feel really hypo.

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    Interesting...since I had Hashimoto's about the same time I started getting celiac problems, though it has taken me 20 years to get a diagnosis of celiac.

    I'm right there with you .....I have been going through this for 20 years also getting the run around and playing ring around the rosey. Finally a Dr. who diagnoses me in about 5 min and tell me I'm not crazy!!!

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    For years I have suffered with Hashimoto's and could not understand why I could not loose weight on the oroxine medication even though I exercise and am active. Do you think a Gluten free diet could help me as I am 59 years old?

    @Colleen

    Yes, going gluten-free can help you lose weight if you don't go for the gluten free cookies and such. With the diet, you will cut out fattening foods like pastries, pies, cakes, and most cheap Asian food as Soy Sauce has gluten and Asian restaurants tend to throw all products (gluten and non-gluten) on the same grill so that everything gets contaminated. The resulting diet is very healthy if you eat naturally gluten free (i.e. mostly lean meat, vegetables, and rice and potatoes for the starch). Most imitation and fake foods have gluten (like imitation crab meat), so the diet will force you away from that unhealthy food as well. If you have a gluten intolerance, any repairs this diet allows your body to make to your system will help you body return to a state where it can regulate its weight better.

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    My mother has had Hashimoto's for years. She is 85 and a few years ago started to have all sorts of gastro-intestinal problems. I convinced her to get rid of the gluten and she has been a great deal better.

    I also have had Hasimoto's for the last 16 years. I really cut down on the bread a few years ago and I have been much better. The day will come when I have to give it up entirely I fear but until then I eat stuff made with wheat flour very sparingly.

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    Guest Dianna

    Posted

    I'm reading a book called "Why do I have Thyroid symptoms if my thyroid tests are normal". It is saying most doctors treat Hashimoto's as a thyroid disease by replacing the hormones the autoimmune keeps depleting plus most don't bother testing for adrenal wipe out. It is explaining why they should be treating the autoimmune disease and not be treating it like a thyroid disease. Many times thyroid meds only are a temporary relief. I've also ordered "Stop the thyroid madness" book.

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    Guest Candace

    Posted

    Excellent info. I want to add that if your thryoid tests are within normal range, and you then go off gluten, you will most likely lose weight. At this point, your medication dosage may be too high for your reduced body mass. It's very important to be re-checking your thyroid hormones if you lose weight or change your diet as you could veer into hyperthyroidism, which is what happened to me along with all the messy symptoms. Stay on top of this, please.

    Great tip because I too went off gluten and dropped 10 pounds right away and suddenly started suffering symptoms of hyperthyroidism and it took me a while to realize what was going on. I just moved and need to find a new doctor, but currently I have stopped taking any thyroid medication and am functioning really well....any other time in my life I was not on medication for hypothyroidism, I would turn into a zombie with lots of aches, pains, and feeling depressed. I was on 120 mcg of synthroid before, now I'm on nothing and doing better than ever. I am going to be scheduling an appointment with a new doc soon though just to keep on top of things.

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    Although the evidence toward gluten and Hashimoto's is strong so is the evidence from excessive Bromine intake relative to iodine intake. What is interesting is Bromine is added to bread in many areas. People who go gluten free are probably also removing a key source of Bromine from their diets. Needless to say, but there is a lot to figure out.

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    This web-site is excellent! I have learned so much ! Cutting back and eliminating all gluten has really helped. I feel less brain-fog, wake-up rested and ready to go, and my abdomen feels great not at all burning and painful.

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    Rogue antibodies cause damage in both organs, a really helpful article!

    I also would like to know if anyone has developed a condition with symptoms such as angeoedema (sp). hives, rashes, swollen lymph nodes under arms. and inflammation under the skin. Even though I have gone off gluten these symptoms still occur.

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    Guest Danielle

    Posted

    I also would like to know if anyone has developed a condition with symptoms such as angeoedema (sp). hives, rashes, swollen lymph nodes under arms. and inflammation under the skin. Even though I have gone off gluten these symptoms still occur.

    tlee,

    Yes, I have also experienced red rashes, hives, swelling all along my jaw line, neck, chest/breast area, even my arms, under arms, and shoulders. I have been trying very hard to stay gluten free but, I am also having these reactions with certain foods that claim to be gluten free. I also experience at times, extreme intolerance to cold, and become extremely tired (as if I had been drugged) I can't stay awake no matter how hard I try to fight it (this happens usually a few days before "that time of the month"). I too have had a great deal of difficulty trying to lose weight. I am very very active, I go to the gym. I do cardio, fat burning and weight /strength training every other day for 2.5-3 hrs. I also walk the opposite days that I am not at the gym for 2.5-3 hrs. I do feel like a freak at times!! Some people don't understand how it feels or what a struggle it is to deal with this on a daily basis.

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    Joyce... as a child they called "nervous stomach"... at 30, "colitis"... at 50 "IRS"... at 70, now, I've discovered it is gluten intolerance. I cannot begin to tell how much pain and emotional hard ache this condition has caused. If you suspect you may have celiac disease, get help and understanding. It will cause much damage if untreated.

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    I'm 35, and I have had problems all my life with my stomach, cystic acne, small blisters on my hands and feet, migraines (last one made me faint), depression, memory loss, sleeping problems and pain all over!!! Goodness, the list goes on and on. I have been hospitalized for my stomach and no doctor could ever tell me what was wrong. All these years and 4 kids later, I find people like you who leave comments on pages like this... what a great help!!! In reading your posts, I think now I can go into a doctor's office and tell them what test I need, not ask them... thanks!

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    Hi, I have Hashimoto's and when I stopped eating gluten in all forms, the swelling in my thyroid went away. And if I eat any gluten, my thyroid swells.

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    Jefferson Adams
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    Dig Dis Sci. DOI 10.1007/s10620-010-1261-y

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    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com