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    Can a New Drug Reduce Symptoms of Accidental Gluten Exposure in Celiac Patients?


    Jefferson Adams
    • Patients receiving the highest dose of AMG 714 had no clinically active disease at week twelve of the study, and also had a significant improvement in self-reported outcomes, compared with the placebo group.

    Can a New Drug Reduce Symptoms of Accidental Gluten Exposure in Celiac Patients?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--ZaldyImg

    Celiac.com 08/07/2018 - A new drug designed to reduce symptoms of accidental gluten ingestion in celiac disease sufferers has yielded some encouraging data. The drug in question is a monoclonal antibody designed to reduce adverse reactions in celiacs who are accidentally exposed to gluten. The results, presented at Digestive Disease Week, held in Washington DC from 2–5 June 2018, suggest that monoclonal antibodies could provide protection for people with celiac disease.

    Celiac patients on a gluten-free diet who randomly received six injections of a monoclonal antibody, called AMG 714, over a ten-week period, enjoyed a substantial reduction in intestinal inflammation. Over a ten week study period, celiac patients on a gluten-free diet received six randomly assigned injections of either a placebo, or of AMG 714 at a dose of either 150mg or 300mg. 

    Patients then underwent a dietary gluten challenge from week through until week twelve. As tested, the drug did not reduce damage to intestinal villi for either treatment group, which was the trial’s primary goal, but it did significantly reduce celiac-related inflammation and symptoms in response to gluten consumption.

    Patients receiving the highest dose of AMG 714 had no clinically active disease at week twelve of the study, and also had a significant improvement in self-reported outcomes, compared with the placebo group. No matter how diligently people with celiac disease follow a gluten-free diet, they can still suffer accidental gluten exposure ingestion.

    Treatments like AMG 714 could become important adjunct to gluten-free diet in for people with celiac disease, including non-responsive celiac disease.

    Read more in Pharmaceutical-journal.com

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Ten Things to Try if You Accidentally Eat Gluten
    Celiac.com 07/03/2015 - For people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, accidentally eating gluten can have numerous undesirable consequences.
    Symptoms of gluten-exposure among people with celiac disease can vary, but main problems and complaints include: upset stomach, stomach pain, inflammation, diarrhea, gas, bloating, indigestion, heart burn, skin rash or breakouts, and nerve and arthritis pain, among others.
    If you're one of these people, then you likely work pretty hard to make sure everything you eat is gluten-free. But what can you do if you accidentally eat gluten?
    Officially, beyond simply waiting it out, there is no clinically accepted treatment for people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity who accidentally eat gluten. However, there are things that many people claim will reduce the suffering and promote healing when this happens. Here are the best home remedies for accidental gluten ingestion, as submitted by readers to our gluten-free forum.
    The main goal is to reduce or eliminate the worst immediate symptoms, including pain, inflammation, diarrhea, gas and or bloating, etc. The secondary goal is to rebuild gut health.
    So what works? Or, what do people say works for them? The remedies listed below are not ranked in any particular order of importance or efficacy.
    Fasting—Recent studies indicate that fasting for a couple of days can help to reset the immune system, which might be beneficial for those suffering from an adverse gluten reaction. Be sure to check with a doctor before fasting, just to be safe. Digestive Enzymes-- For many people, digestive enzymes seem to help the bloating. Many people claim that such enzymes help provide relief, especially against small amounts of gluten. Two such products are Eater's Digest by Traditional Medicinals, and Gluten Defense digestive enzymes. Green tea or peppermint tea. Many people have reported that green tea is also helpful. Peppermint tea is said to promote muscle relaxation, and can help for gassy stomach issues. Strong gluten-free peppermints will work in a pinch. Imodium seems to help some people control associated diarrhea. If you have diarrhea, be sure to drink water with electrolytes to help replace lost fluids. Pepto-Bismol—Some people take Pepto-Bismol to help relieve stomach upset. Marshmallow root can help to sooth stomach and gas pain. Antihistamines—Some people claim to find relief with antihistamines, such as Benedryl, Clatratin, or Zyrtec. Often these are used in combination with other remedies Probiotics—Many people find probiotics to be helpful, especially as part of a general gut maintenance program. Probiotics are generally more helpful in advance of accidental gluten exposure, but many people take them after exposure. Either way, it certainly can't hurt. Broth—Many people with celiac disease, gut and/or nutritional issues turn to broth for help in building gut health and proper nutrition. Good old fashioned beef, chicken or fish broth can be a beneficial part of a healthy gut regimen. Broth also has many health properties beyond gut healing. Tummy Rescue Smoothie: This recipe was developed by a celiac.com reader in response to his own "gluten emergency.” The healing properties of each ingredient are also listed. Puree in blender until smooth, and slightly thickened. It is most soothing when consumed while still warm from the hot tea. Tummy Rescue Smoothie:
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    Longer-term strategies include rebuilding intestinal health with an anti-inflammatory diet, taking supplements like L-Glutamine, coconut oil, fat-soluble vitamins A, E, D, and K, Calcium, Magnesium, B-Vitamins, Essential Fatty Acids (EFA's), and probiotics, including acidophilus for about a week to get intestinal flora back in order.
    This list is not intended to be authoritative or comprehensive. Nor is it intended as medical advice, or as a substitute for medical advice. As with any health remedy, do your research and make the choices that are right for you.
    If you have any thoughts or insights on how best to treat accidental gluten ingestion for people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, please share them in our comments section below.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/07/2017 - There's been a great deal of excitement, and plenty of confusion, among celiac sufferers about a drug that breaks down gluten into harmless smaller molecules. The good news is that the drug, GluteGuard, has shown some early promise in treating gluten intolerance in randomized human trials. The enzyme supplement currently available through Glutagen's website, and registered in Australia as a "listed complementary medicine".
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    The maker, Glutagen, claims that:
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    GluteGuard is based on the papaya enzyme, caricain, which not only reduces gluten to smaller molecules, but further breaks down those products that negatively impact individuals affected by gluten.
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    Read an important notice regarding GluteGuard for people with celiac disease: Celiac.org.au
     
    This article was revised by Celiac.com on 11/02/2017 to address concerns that were raised by GluteGard.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can Papaya-based Enzymes Provide a Hedge Against Gluten Ingestion?
    Celiac.com 12/14/2017 - Can enzyme supplements help people with gluten sensitivity, including those with celiac disease? An Australian company is touting the results of a recent randomized, double blind study that supports enzyme supplements might be helpful for celiac patients in certain circumstances.
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    GluteGuard was recently evaluated in two clinical studies in Poland. The first study looked at 20 patients with celiac disease who were in clinical remission on a gluten-free diet. In that study, all patients ate one gram of gluten, equal to about one slice of bread, each day for 42 days, with 14 patients also taking GluteGuard and six taking a placebo tablet. Patients noted their symptoms and well-being each day, and received biopsies both before and after the study. Thirteen of the 14 celiac patients (93%) taking GluteGuard showed no adverse changes in clinical symptoms, biopsy results or well-being throughout the 42 day trial. Only one GluteGuard patient withdrew due to celiac-associated symptoms, while 4 of 6 taking placebo withdrew after 14 days due to adverse celiac symptoms.
    The second Polish study looked at the effectiveness of GluteGuard in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, a gluten-triggered skin condition common in celiac patients. As with the first study, all patients in these study were in clinical remission. Patients consumed around six grams of gluten daily for seven days, with ten patients also receiving GluteGuard tablets and ten getting a placebo.
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    Read more at Medicalexpress.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    How Much Gluten Does an Average Celiac Patient Accidentally Consume?
    Celiac.com 04/02/2018 - Exactly how hard is it for people with celiac disease to faithfully follow a gluten-free diet? Anyone who’s ever tried to completely avoid gluten for any length of time likely has a story to tell about accidental gluten consumption, and the consequences that follow. It’s not at all uncommon for gluten-free celiacs to be exposed to low levels of gluten that can trigger symptoms and cause persistent intestinal histologic damage.
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    Using the stool test, the team estimated the average inadvertent exposure to gluten by celiac disease individuals on a GFD to be about 150–400 mg/d, while they estimated the median exposure to be about 100–150 mg/d. Using the urine test, those numbers showed an average exposure of about 300–400 mg/d, with a median of about 150 mg/d. 
    Meanwhile, data analyses showed that celiac patients with moderate to severe symptoms showed that patients ingested substantially more than 200 mg/d of gluten.
    The data indicate that many gluten-free celiacs regularly consume enough gluten to trigger symptoms and perpetuate gut damage.
    Source:
    The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 107, Issue 2, 1 February 2018

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