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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 10/28/2005 - Alba Therapeutics Corporation (Alba) today announced successful completion of its first Phase I trial for the drug candidate AT-1001, and that the FDA has granted Fast Track designation to AT-1001 for treatment of celiac disease. We are pleased to have concluded our first human study of oral AT-1001 and delighted that the FDA has granted fast track status to AT-1001. These two events are important additional milestones in our efforts to help those suffering from celiac disease, a disease for which there is no effective treatment, said Blake Paterson, MD, President and CEO of Alba. Alba plans to begin a proof of concept study demonstrating efficacy of AT-1001 in celiac patients within the next few months. Fast track process is designed to facilitate development and expedite the review of new drugs with the potential to address significant unmet medical needs for the treatment of serious or life-threatening conditions. Potential fast track benefits include FDA input into development, submitting new drug applications in sections rather than all at once and the option of requesting Accelerated Approval.
    About Celiac Disease
    Celiac disease is a T-cell mediated auto-immune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and is characterized by small intestinal inflammation, injury and intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a mixture of proteins found in common food grains such as wheat, rye and barley. According to the NIH, celiac disease affects approximately 3 million Americans, although the diagnosis is rarely made. The only treatment for celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which results in remission for some patients.
    About Zonulin
    Zonulin is an endogenous signaling protein that transiently and reversibly opens the tight junctions (tj) between the cells of epithelial and endothelial tissues such as the intestinal mucosa, blood brain barrier and pulmonary epithelia. Discovered by Alba co-founder Dr. Alessio Fasano, zonulin appears to be involved in many disease states in which leakage occurs via paracellular transport across epithelial and endothelial tight junctions (tj), and thus may play an important potential role in the treatment of auto-immune diseases.
    About Alba
    Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba is dedicated to commercializing disease-modifying therapeutics and drug delivery adjuvants based on the zonulin pathway. Albas lead molecule, AT-1001, is targeted towards the treatment of Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes.
    Contact: Dr. Blake Paterson
    Alba Therapeutics Corporation
    410-522-8708


    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 03/14/2006 - Alba Therapeutics Corporation announced today successful completion of Phase Ib proof-of-concept studies for its lead compound, AT1001. In a 21-patient cohort of celiac disease sufferers, the oral administration of AT1001 versus placebo control induced a significantly positive result in the trials primary target endpoint. "We anticipated a strong signal, however, the magnitude of the response surpassed our expectations," stated Blake Paterson, M.D., President and CEO of Alba. "We are particularly excited, as to the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a desired and systemic immunological effect resulting from a physiological event at a mucosal surface."
    AT1001 is an antagonist to the zonulin system -- a signaling pathway discovered by Alessio Fasano, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine and Physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, and the basis of Albas extensive intellectual property portfolio.
    About Zonulin
    Zonulin is a signaling protein that transiently and reversibly opens the tight junctions ("tj") between the cells of epithelial and endothelial tissues such as the intestinal mucosa, blood brain barrier and pulmonary epithelia. Zonulin appears to be involved in many diseases in which leakage occurs via paracellular transport across epithelial and endothelial tight junctions (tj), and thus may play an important potential role in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.
    About Celiac Disease
    Celiac disease (celiac disease) is a T-cell mediated auto-immune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals and is characterized by small intestinal inflammation, injury and intolerance to gluten. According to the National Institutes of Health, celiac disease affects approximately 3 million Americans, although the diagnosis is rarely made. The only current treatment for celiac disease is complete elimination of gluten from the diet, which results in remission for some patients.
    About Alba
    Alba Therapeutics Corporation is a privately held biopharmaceutical company based in Baltimore, Maryland. Alba is dedicated to commercializing disease-modifying therapeutics and drug delivery adjuvants based on the zonulin pathway. Albas lead molecule, AT-1001, is targeted towards the treatment of celiac disease and other auto-immune illnesses.
    Contact: Heather Bakalyar, 410-522-8708 x1106

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/10/2007 - A study published recently in the journal of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics shows that the paracellular permeability inhibitor AT-1001 effectively reduces intestinal barrier dysfunction, proinflammatory cytokine production, and gastrointestinal symptoms in people who have celiac disease. At present, a lifetime devoted to following a strict gluten-free diet is the backbone of current treatment for celiac disease. However, as researchers have come to know more about celiac disease, they’re insights are leading to developments that offer more effective prognosis and treatment of the disease.
    One of those promising new approaches involves treating celiac patients with doses of AT-1001, a paracellular permeability inhibitor that is structurally derived from a protein secreted by Vibrio cholerae. Recently, a team of medical researchers set out to assess the safety and tolerability of 12 mg doses of AT-1001 in people with celiac disease who submitted to acute gluten exposure.
    For the in-patient, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled safety study, researchers looked at twenty men and women with celiac disease and measured intestinal permeability, through fractional excretions of lactulose and mannitol, as an exploratory measure of the efficacy of AT-1001 in treating celiac disease.
    The test subjects were men and women with age ranging from 18 to 59 years old. Each was pre-screened and referred by a gastroenterologist. Each had positive biopsy and antibody screens that indicated celiac disease. Each had also been on a gluten-free diet at least six months, was not known to be IgA deficient, and presented with anti-tTG titres of <10 EU at enrollment.
    Study shows safety and tolerability of 12 mg doses of AT-1001 in celiac disease
    In the placebo group, acute gluten exposure brought an observable 70% increase in intestinal permeability, compared to no change at all in the AT-1001 group. Four of seven patients (57%) of the placebo group showed increased levels of Interferon-gamma levels, but in the AT-1001 group only four of 14 patients (29%) showed such increases. Also, the placebo group showed gastrointestinal symptoms more frequently than the AT-1001 group (P = 0.018).
    From the results, the researchers concluded that AT-1001 is well tolerated and appears to reduce intestinal barrier dysfunction, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac patients subjected to gluten exposure.
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 26, 757-766
    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/21/2016 - Researchers at Boston University's Henry M. Golden School of Dental Medicine have identified a metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria, which may lead to new treatments for celiac disease.
    A research team that set out to isolate and identify the enzymes and evaluate their potential as novel enzyme therapeutics for celiac disease, reports that the enzymes exhibit exceptionally high gluten-degrading enzyme activities, and are "naturally associated with bacteria that colonize the oral cavity."
    Rothia bacteria, found in human saliva, can break down gluten compounds that cause an exaggerated immune response and that are typically resistant to the digestive enzymes that mammals produce. The team was able to isolate a new class of gluten-degrading enzymes from Rothia mucilaginosa, an oral microbial colonizer. The Rothia enzymes in question belong to the same class as food-grade Bacillus enzymes. The researchers noted that "B. subtilis is food safe and has been consumed for decades, e.g. in a product called natto, a Japanese fermented soy bean dish."
    B. subtilis and its products have been safely consumed by humans for many hundreds of years, with very few problems reported. They add that the "…food-grade status of B. subtilis, and the already widely consumed natto products, open new avenues for potential therapeutic applications of the subtilisin enzymes."
    The Rothia subtilisins and two subtilisins from Bacillus licheniformis, subtilisin A and the food-grade Nattokinase, efficiently degraded the immunogenic gliadin-derived 33-mer peptide and the immunodominant epitopes recognized by the R5 and G12 antibodies. This study identified as promising new candidates for enzyme therapeutics in celiac disease.
    Based on these results, the research team concludes that gluten-degrading Rothia and food-grade Bacillus subtilisins are the "preferred therapy of choice for celiac disease," and that their exceptional enzymatic activity, along with their connection to natural human microbial colonizers, make them "worthy of further exploration for clinical applications in celiac disease and potentially other gluten-intolerance disorders."
    Their study appears in the American Journal of Physiology—Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

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