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    Could a New Vaccine Mean Safe Gluten Consumption for Celiac Disease Sufferers?


    Jefferson Adams
    • An Australian university is beginning trials on a vaccine that could change the face of celiac disease treatment by allowing celiacs to safely eat gluten.

    Could a New Vaccine Mean Safe Gluten Consumption for Celiac Disease Sufferers?

    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 

    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.

    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”

    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.

    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

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    Guest Laura

    Posted

    I wonder if the vaccine would negate the gluten cross-reactor symptoms.  It is not difficult to find foods free of gluten, but processed foods, breads, pretzels, broth, dips, etc. are loaded with yeast and/or milk & egg.  

    It's been 9 years since I last ate these things. I would have no issues staying on a gluten-free diet, but would cherish being able to consume the cross-reactors without a GI reaction.  That in and of itself would be a "miracle".  Time will tell.  At any rate, it has been many years of non-stop food insecurity.  Generally speaking,  I wish food consumption were not a necessary part of living. 

    Why, oh why, did the scientists engineer wheat to contain 17 times the gluten content of the 1960's version?  Why, oh why, did the FDA approve the high-gluten hybrid plant without testing it in a controlled population?  Every year the ICD-10 classification for celiac & non-celiac gluten sensitivity diseases has expanded.  Where will it end?

    Good News:  I found 2 new products (crackers) & 1 older product (humus) that do not contain the toxic oils: canola, sunflower, safflower, grape seed or cotton seed oils, no egg, no yeast.  Just had my first cracker after 9 years.  I tried them & had no reactions.  

     

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    Is there a timeline for completion of the study and will this potentially meet US FDA standards for approval for use here in the U.S.

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    Guest EA1985

    Posted

    Any timeline?

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/24/2014 - Though some celiacs will tell you they’re content to remain gluten-free for life, being able to freely consume gluten is the dream of many a person with celiac disease.
    ImmusanT is one of the few companies working on an actual vaccine for celiac disease. Over the next few months, ImmusanT is likely to begin reporting data from two separate early-stage clinical trials for NexVax2, a celiac disease vaccine.
    That data will offer the first glimpse into the potential for ImmusanT to treat celiac disease, and into the viability of the company’s peptide immunotherapy platform.
    The current two studies are Phase 1b trials, designed to confirm the safety of NexVax2, and to find a range of potential doses for the company’s next trials. Success at this stage still means a very long process for ImmusanT, as numerous clinical hurdles remain.
    Meanwhile, several other companies trying to find non-vaccine treatments for celiac disease.
    Both San Carlos, CA-based Alvine Pharmaceuticals and Baltimore, MD-based Alba Therapeutics, for instance, are developing drugs to supplement an existing gluten-free diet.
    Rather than being full-blown vaccines, these drugs are intended to reduce or eliminate adverse gluten-reactions due to simple gluten-contamination.
    Another company, Sitari Pharmaceuticals, fueled by $10 million in capital, and a joint venture with GlaxoSmithKline and Avalon Ventures, is also looking to pursue treatments for the digestive disorder.
    For its part, ImmusanT remains committed to its goal of developing a vaccine that will allow celiac patients to eat all the gluten they want.
    The company says its drug is currently the only treatment in development “focusing on disease modification so patients can resume an unrestricted diet.”
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    Xconomyc.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Would You Try a Vaccine for Celiac Disease?
    Celiac.com 08/26/2016 - News that ImmusanT company is beginning full human trials for their celiac disease vaccine, NexVax 2, brought a number of comments from our readers.
    We first reported on their effort way back in 2002, with our story, Australian Researchers Begin Work on a Vaccine for Celiac Disease.
    We followed up over the years, with stories in 2009, First Ever Celiac Disease Vaccine Trials Underway in Australia and again in 2011, with articles reporting on the company's efforts to raise investment funds, titled ImmusanT Raises $20 Million in Series A Financing to Advance Immunotherapeutic and Diagnostic for Celiac Disease and on how ImmusanT's Celiac Vaccine Passed Phase I Clinical Trials and in 2012, with Is a Vaccine for Celiac Disease Just Around the Corner?
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    From Jared M: I hope this research goes well. The bread, crackers and pizza I can live without. But I would really like to be able to drink a good IPA again. The sorghum beers are horrible. I am quickly growing tired of ciders. I would definitely pay for this treatment if it works.
    From Toni: I have celiac. That [a vaccine] would be wonderful.
    From Traci: I would like to be involved in a study for this immunization.
    From Linda Haas: Can't wait to hear more about the progress made on this vaccine...it sounds very promising!
    From Donda: I'm thrilled with the possibility of this coming to market.
    From Muriel Weadick: This is what all celiacs have been waiting for, and I am sure I am not alone in wishing the company success.
    From Suzanne: A vaccine like this would make it easier to eat out and go on vacation.
    Jeanne Burge wrote: I would gladly volunteer for the trials in the US. Hope this works!
    Still, a few comments ran toward the less than glowing side, with some people expressing trepidation, or outright distrust toward such a vaccine.
    From Cathi: My Question is, "What will be the side effects of this turning off the body's ability to fight Gluten?" Will there still be destruction some place else and maybe worse? So, many times a pill is created to help one thing only to find out that it created another problem some place else in the body. Frankly, I am worried.
    From Donna: Absolutely agree with you, Cathi. There is always a problem and side effects with ANY drug! My question is this - WHAT ELSE will be shut off? Will we be even MORE susceptible to other illnesses? I am worried as well!
    From Balm: Thanks but no thanks. I'll remain a celiac and continue to eat healthy. While trying to fix one problem, some will end up with far worse problems.
    From Jonnys: Stupid idea! Just another way to make more money off of people.
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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