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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/04/2016 - Any one eager to try the first approved treatment for celiac disease might not have to wait much longer.
    Alba Therapeutics has announced that their celiac treatment, larazotide acetate, will enter the first Phase 3 clinical trials ever conducted in a celiac disease drug later this year.
    Lorazotide acetate works by improving regulation of tight junctions in the bowel. In healthy people, these junctions remain closed except to shed dead cells, but in patients with celiac disease, gluten keeps tight junctions open, triggering an inflammatory reaction that eventually destroys the intestinal villi, tiny, finger-like projections in the small intestine that are essential for nutrient absorption.
    Early research suggests larazotide acetate helps to keep the tight junctions closed when it's taken before a meal, thus stopping, or reducing the reaction and the resulting inflammation.
    Larazotide acetate recently completed during phase 2b clinical trials for efficacy, safety and tolerability in 342 patients with celiac disease. Those trials showed larazotide acetate to be safe and effective in a "real world setting" for celiac patients, according to Alba's website.
    The treatment is now headed to Phase 3 trials in "late 2016", and has received "fast track" designation from the Food and Drug Administration.
    Alba has announced that Innovate Biopharmaceuticals Inc. has licensed all of Alba Therapeutics' assets related to larazotide acetate, and that larazotide acetate has been renamed INN-202.
    If approved on schedule, INN-202 will become the first prescription medicine for treating celiac disease.
    Source:
    Allergic Living

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/05/2016 - Currently, a gluten free diet is the only option for treating celiac disease. Still, there are numerous patients who follow the diet, but do not respond fully clinically or histologically.
    What options do doctors have to treat celiac disease beyond a gluten-free diet? A team of researchers wanted to find out. The research team includes S. Kurada, A. Yadav, and DA Leffler of the Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and the Celiac Research Program at Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine at Boston Medical Center’s Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts.
    The team conducted a search of PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov to highlight celiac disease articles that use keywords including 'celiac disease' and 'refractory celiac disease' and focused on articles conducting pathophysiologic and therapeutic research in/ex-vivo models and human trials.
    They then zeroed-in on developing therapies that influence these processes, including tight junction regulators, glutenases, gluten sequestrants and immunotherapy using vaccines, nanoparticles that may serve as adjuncts to a gluten-free diet, or maybe even allow for gluten consumption.
    Their subsequent paper also highlight the role of anti-inflammatories, immunosuppressants and monoclonal antibodies in refractory celiac disease.
    According to the commentary of their expert, "therapies including tight junction regulators and glutenases have the potential to be approved for non-responsive celiac disease, or as gluten adjuncts."
    The team expect results of various phase 1/2 trials using AMG 714, BL 7010, IgY antibodies to be published. In the interim, They plan to treat refractory celiac disease with off-label use of 5 amino-salicylates, budesonide, nucleoside analogues and newer biologics developed for other inflammatory diseases.
    Source:
    Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Jun 23:1-13.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/25/2016 - Celiac disease is one of the most common immune-mediated diseases. Often, a gluten-free diet does not fully control celiac symptoms and disease activity.
    Even though no new therapies have been approved, a growing effort, coupled with a rapidly expanding knowledge of the regulatory pathway could soon lead to new breakthroughs.
    A team of researchers recently reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment paradigm for celiac disease. The researchers were M Wungjiranirun, CP Kelly, and DA Leffler, both of the Division of Gastroenterology at the Celiac Center of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    They also reviewed the major types of therapies being proposed for celiac treatment, and expounded broadly upon what is known, and what can be predicted concerning the regulatory pathway for approval of a new celiac disease treatment. In the near future, increasingly numerous and diverse therapy options will enter clinical trials. The desired result will be the first approved agents targeting celiac disease treatment outside of a gluten-free diet.
    The team notes that, though things like biopsies and blood tests will always be important in therapeutic clinical trials, there is not currently enough evidence to link them with improved patient outcomes, which is required as a baseline for drug approval. This means that patient-reported outcomes will likely be primary end points in Phase III celiac disease trials for some time to come.
    Source:
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jun;111(6):779-86. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2016.105. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/19/2016 - The world's first vaccine aimed at curing celiac disease is slated to begin full trials later this year, and residents of the Australian state of Victoria will be among the first humans to give it a try against celiac disease.
    The vaccine, called Nexvax2, was developed by Australian scientist Dr Bob Anderson, and is aimed at giving celiac patients a chance to overcome their immune reaction to the gluten found in products containing wheat, rye and barley. Nexvax2 aims to de-sensitise patients to three peptides contained in gluten that trigger a damaging reaction in their immune system.
    Previous trials on 150 patients from Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane and Auckland were aimed at finding a safe dosage rather than assessing its ability to beat celiac disease. Results from those favorable earlier trials were released in May, and Dr Anderson says that the larger phase II study, also being undertaken in the US and Europe, will assess how well the vaccine works against celiac disease.
    Dr Anderson first identified the peptides triggering coeliac disease and began developing the vaccine while working at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, before travelling to Boston for six weeks as part of a sister city arrangement through the City of Melbourne, where he made contact with ImmusanT to further the discovery.
    This is certainly exciting news for people with celiac disease, many of whom may benefit from such treatment.
    Stay tuned for news on the progress of these trials.
    Source:
    dailysecrets.press

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    Hi Mom, I am so sorry you're getting the run around. Yes, the links worked for me too & that poor little thing! Cyclinglady gave you excellent advice. I really can't add anything to it but everything she says is right on. Keep advocating!  Read this: https://www.sjsreview.com/8752/features/sophomore-establishes-celiac-support-group/ I found how you can contact her. GenerationGF.Houston@gluten.org Here's the web page. Scroll down to the TX groups. https://gluten.org/k
    Wow!  I can say thank you in Polish, but can not spell it.  This is a bit off topic, but I will post this here and then open a new topic.   A month or so ago, a guest commented on an article that Celiac.com had published.  The guest mentioned that she has been a celiac for decades, long before the gluten free craze.  She noticed that she is now getting more gluten exposures compared to the years when there were very few gluten free processed foods on the market.  Interesting. With
    The celiac tests are: TTG IgA TTG IgG DGP IgA DGP IgG  EMA IgA And....Immunogobulin A (IgA).  This test is used only as a control test when checking for celiac disease.  If your body is not producing enough IgA, the IgA celiac tests are invalid or will not work.    You would also have a immune deficiency issues too.  But that is a separate issue.   The previous link I gave you spells out the test names which are long!  😆
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