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    Diagnostic Performance of IgG Anti-deamidated Gliadin Peptide Antibody Assays is Comparable to IgA Anti-tTG in Celiac Disease


    Jefferson Adams


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    Celiac.com 03/25/2010 - A team of researchers recently set out to compare the diagnostic performance of IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays against IgA anti-tTG in celiac disease. The team included P. Vermeersch, K. Geboes, G. Mariën, I. Hoffman, M. Hiele, X. Bossuyt, all associated with the department of Laboratory Medicine, Immunology of University Hospitals at the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium.

    Using IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays to test for celiac disease is more sensitive and more specific for celiac disease than detection of IgG antibodies against native gliadin. The team compared assessed the technical performance and accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of commercial IgG anti-DGP assays from Euroimmun, Inova, Phadia and The Binding Site against other serologic assays for celiac disease, such as 3IgA and 2IgG anti-tTG assays, 1IgA and 1IgG anti-gliadin assay, 1IgA anti-DGP assay.

    For the study, they tested 86 patients with clinically proven celiac disease and 741 healthy control subjects. Technical performance of IgG anti-DGP assays as gauged by linearity, interference and imprecision, was within acceptable levels. IgG anti-DGP assay sensitivity ranged between 76.7% and 83.7% at the manufacturer's recommended cut-off, and between 74.4% and 84.9% at a cut-off that corresponded to a 98% specificity level. Specificity ranged between 97.3% and 99.3%.

    The diagnostic accuracy of the IgG anti-DGP assays was comparable to the diagnostic accuracy of the IgA anti-tTG assays. IgG anti-DGP assays showed significantly better than sensitivity than the IgG anti-tTG assays (p<0.05) and and significantly better specificity than IgA and IgG anti-gliadin assays (p<0.05).

    The four IgG anti-DGP assays all performed within acceptable limits, and diagnosed celiac disease with comparable accuracy as did the three IgA anti-tTG assays.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Vijay Kumar, MD, Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics
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    Scott Adams
    J Autoimmun. 2004 Feb;22(1):65-72
    Celiac.com 01/29/2004 - A new cloning technique developed by Italian researchers may lead to more accurate diagnoses of celiac disease in borderline patients, including those who are asymptomatic. The technique screens for anti-tTG antibodies in the intestinal mucosa by utilizing a cloning process to amplify the antibodies, thus allowing for their detection even in cases where only minute amounts are present. The new technique is similar to that developed and long utilized by Dr. Kenneth Fine of Enterolab, in that both techniques look for the presence of antibodies in the intestinal mucosa rather than in the blood. The new technique also has the potential to easily screen large numbers of people, which, if the researchers are correct, will lead to a celiac disease diagnostic explosion, as those who are missed by current screening methods will be properly diagnosed. The number of celiacs who are missed using current screening techniques is a topic of debate, and Dr. Fines methods have demonstrated that "in normal people without specific symptoms or syndromes , the stool test is just under three times more likely to be positive than blood tests," as reported in the Winter 2004 edition of Scott-Free newsletter. It would be very interesting to see how many people test positive in a healthy population using this new technique.
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    One-step cloning of anti tissue transglutaminase scFv from subjects with celiac disease
    .
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    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/28/2010 - Celiac disease research is linking Irritable Bowel Syndrome with gluten intolerance and doctors are recommending IBS sufferers, especially those with diarrhea-predominant IBS, to get tested for gluten issues or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, often affecting the entire body and manifesting various physical and mental symptoms, and a gluten-free diet is the simple treatment for this disease.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2011 - In an effort to improve diagnosis of celiac disease in patients already on a gluten-free diet, a team of researchers recently evaluated HLA-DQ2-gliadin tetramers for detection of gluten-specific T cells in peripheral blood and histological changes in the duodenum after a short gluten challenge as a diagnostic tool.
    The study team included Margit Brottveit MD, Melinda Ráki MD, PhD, Elin Bergseng MScPharm, PhD, Lars-Egil Fallang MSc, PhD, Bjørg Simonsen BLS, Astrid Løvik MSc, Stig Larsen MSc, PhD, Else Marit Løberg MD, PhD, Frode L Jahnsen MD, PhD, Ludvig M Sollid MD, PhD, and Knut EA Lundin MD, PhD.
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    After the gluten challenge, 11 of the 13 celiac disease patients showed a positive tetramer test, while four of them also showed typical histological changes on biopsy.
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    From these results, the team concluded that tetramer staining for gluten-specific T cells is a sensitive method in detecting an immune response in celiac disease patients after a short gluten challenge.

    SOURCE:
    Am J Gastroenterol advance online publication 1 March 2011;    doi: 10.1038/ajg.2011.23


  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Advertising Banner-Ads
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    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au