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    Histological, Serological and Symptomatic Responses to Gluten Challenge in Adults with Celiac Disease


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 08/10/2012 - A diagnosis of Celiac disease is measured mainly by an adverse response to gluten, yet there is very little in the way of data regarding gluten challenge in adults on a gluten-free diet.

    Photo: CC--rprataA research team recently studied the kinetics of histological, serological, and symptomatic responses to gluten challenge in adults with celiac disease.

    The research team included D. Leffler, D. Schuppan, K. Pallav, R. Najarian, J.D. Goldsmith, J. Hansen, T. Kabbani T, M. Dennis, and C.P. Kelly. They are affiliated with Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts.

    For their study, the team wanted to address a lack of data regarding the kinetics of responses to gluten, which causes assessment issues in clinical practice and research when gluten-challenge is performed.

    For their study, the researchers recruited twenty adults with biopsy-proven coeliac disease. For each participant, the team conducted two run-in visits followed by a 14-day gluten-challenge at a randomly assigned dose of 3 or 7.5 g of gluten/day.

    Patients visited study team doctors at 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after the start of their gluten challenge.

    The researchers performed duodenal biopsy during the run-in and at days 3 and 14 of gluten challenge.

    The team used two pathologists to measure villous height to crypt depth ratio (Vh:celiac disease) and intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) count/100 enterocytes. Upon each visit, the team also assessed antibodies to tissue transglutaminase and deamidated gliadin peptides, lactulose to mannitol ratio (LAMA) and any physical symptoms.

    Compared to the initial data, results after 14 days showed substantially lower Vh:celiac disease (2.2-1.1, p

    Interestingly, gastrointestinal symptoms increased significantly after three days, but had returned to baseline by day 28. There were no differences between the higher and lower gluten doses.

    The team concludes by noting that a 14-day gluten challenge at or above 3 g of gluten/day triggers cellular, tissue, and blood changes in most adults with celiac disease.

    These findings will help researchers create more accurate clinical trials, and show that many individuals will meet celiac diagnostic criteria after a basic 2-week gluten challenge.

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    I wonder if the leveling off of the bodies response to gluten provides any clues on how to control the response- or if it's just a saturation factor.

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    Guest Kathryn

    Posted

    So, how much, say, white bread would one need to consume to meet the 3 grams of gluten criterion? By gluten, do they speak of white flour, 3 grams of bread, or 3 grams of pure gluten?

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    Guest David Schanz

    Posted

    I found it intriguing that intestinal symptoms returned to baseline after 28 days. Many people note an increased sensitivity to gluten after spending some time on a gluten-free diet. I have often wondered if this increased sensitivity would be mitigated after a return to consuming significant amounts of gluten. It would be interesting to know what exactly they meant by baseline. It's hard to imagine that at least some didn't continue with intestinal distress. Maybe gastro symptoms would return after more time on gluten, after more damage has been done. We need more such studies to fully understand the effects of celiac and gluten sensitivity.

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    After 6 months on a totally gluten free diet, a 2-week gluten challenge prior to (positive) biopsy was almost the end of me. I'm glad further research is being conducted.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Celiac.com 04/16/2010 - In most adults with celiac disease, clinical symptoms disappear with a gluten-free diet. However, the exact effects of a gluten-free diet on rates of mucosal recovery in adults with celiac disease is less certain.
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    The study group included: Alberto Rubio-Tapia, MD; Mussarat W. Rahim, MBBS; Jacalyn A. See , MS , RD, LD; Brian D. Lahr , MS; Tsung-Teh Wu, MD; and Joseph A. Murray, MD.
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    SOURCE: Am J Gastroenterol. 9 February 2010; doi: 10.1038/ajg.2010.10


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