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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 03/19/2002 - The following excerpts were taken from The New England Journal of Medicines January 17, 2002 (Vol. 346, No. 30) article on recovery from celiac disease:
    In addition to a gluten-free diet, all patients with newly diagnosed celiac sprue who have clinically evident malabsorption should initially receive a multi-vitamin preparation and appropriate supplements to correct any iron or folate deficiency. Patients with steatorrhea, hypocalcemia, or osteopenic bone disease should receive oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation.
    Approximately 70 percent of patients have symptomatic improvement within two weeks after starting a gluten-free diet. The speed and eventual degree of histologic improvement are unpredictable but invariably lag behind the clinical response and may not be evident on repeated biopsy for two to three months. Although a return to normal histologic findings is common in children, half of adults have only a partial resolution on biopsy. If a patient has no response to the diet, the most common cause is incomplete adherence. Persistent symptoms may be caused by coexisting disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, microscopic colitis, or pancreatic insufficiency.
    In one study strict adherence to a gluten-free diet reduced the risk of all disease-associated cancers including enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Thus, it seems prudent to recommend lifelong strict adherence to a gluten-free diet in all patients with celiac sprue.
    Regarding untreated celiac sprue:
    Dairy products should be avoided initially because patients with untreated celiac sprue often have secondary lactase deficiency. After three to six months of treatment, diary products can be reintroduced if the patient has no ill effects.

    Scott Adams
    Bardella MT, Minoli G, Radaelli F, Quatrini M, Bianchi PA, Conte D Gastrointest Endosc. 2000 Jun;51(6):714-716
    Background: Loss or reduction of duodenal folds, scalloping of Kerkring folds and a micronodular or mosaic duodenal mucosal pattern have been described in celiac disease (celiac disease), endoscopic findings that are considered reliable in the diagnosis of this disorder. However, most data have been obtained in patients with suspected or certain disease. We assessed the accuracy of the above markers in diagnosing celiac disease in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Methods: In this prospective study, in 705 consecutive dyspeptic patients (284 men, 421 women, mean age 51 +/- SD 15.8 years) duodenal biopsies were obtained only in the presence of typical endoscopic markers, whereas in another 517 (207 men, 310 women, mean age 49.9 +/- SD 16 years) duodenal biopsies were done irrespective of macroscopic findings. celiac disease was diagnosed histologically and on the basis of positive antiendomysium antibody.
    Results: Endoscopic markers were found in 4 patients of the first group but celiac disease was ruled out. In the second group 5 patients had an endoscopic pattern that was consistent and celiac disease was diagnosed in 3, whereas 3 others with normal endoscopic findings were eventually diagnosed as having celiac disease. Endoscopic markers had a sensitivity of 50% and a specificity of 99.6% (95% CI [11.8, 88.2 and 98.6, 99.9], respectively) with positive and negative predictive values of 60% and 99.4%, respectively.
    Conclusion: The accuracy of endoscopic markers in the diagnosis of celiac disease must be reevaluated in relation to the characteristics of the population studied.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 11/08/2005 - York Nutritional Laboratories has introduced to the US a simple, unique and revolutionary finger-stick rapid test kit designed to detect the antibodies associated with Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance.
    Celiac disease is a gluten intolerance enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gluten and specifically to its protein fragment known as gliadin. The ingestion of this protein in people with genetic predisposition induces a severe compromise to the intestinal mucosa that is historically characterized by one hyperplasia of cryptas with total or subtotal atrophy of the intestinal microvilli.
    Though the definitive diagnosis of the celiac disease is based in characteristic histological changes observed in intestinal biopsies, the serological tests, such as the detection of antibodies anti-gliadins, anti-tTG and anti-endomysium, represent methods of analyses cheaper and less invasive to the detection of the disease.
    According to John Kernohan, Director of York Nutritional Laboratories, This new rapid test is a great improvement over our original cdSCAN, which we introduced back in 2002. Individuals now have a even quicker, more convenient and reliable means to determine if Celiac Disease or gluten intolerance is the culprit behind their ill-health.
    The new and improved cdSCAN is able to analyze a tiny sample of whole blood, serum or plasma for IgA/IgG/IgM antibodies against human Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) and IgA antibodies against gliadin. The kit can be utilized in either the comfort of ones own home or at a doctors office, and the results are available in approximately 10 minutes.
    In addition to the approximate 1 million Americans suffering from classical Celiac Disease, there are an equal number of individuals with silent or latent Celiac Disease who are unaware of their condition because they do not have the signs and symptoms typically associated with celiac disease. These individuals run the risk of developing full-blown celiac disease later in life and complications
    such as bowel cancer, infertility and autoimmune diseases, making proper and early diagnosis very important.
    Information about the cdSCAN is available from York Nutritional Laboratories, Inc. Please contact John Kernohan at (888) 751-3388.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/11/2015 - Many people with celiac disease know that gluten exposure can cause gut damage and trouble absorbing some vitamins and minerals, which can lead to serious deficiencies. However, even celiac who follow gluten-free diets may experience similar issues, including impaired vitamin and mineral absorption.
    The most common vitamin and mineral deficiencies in celiac patients include the following vitamins and minerals:
    B vitamins, especially B12 Vitamin A Vitamin D Vitamin E Vitamin K Iron Calcium Carotene Copper Folic acid Magnesium Selenium Zinc As a result, patients with celiac disease can develop iron-deficiency anemia, including a type that resists oral iron supplementation, and may also develop osteoporosis and osteopenia due to bone loss resulting from decreased calcium and vitamin D absorption.
    For these reasons, it is important that patients with celiac disease be monitored regularly to ensure that they have proper levels of vitamins and minerals in their bodies.
    Source:
     U.S. Pharmacist

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