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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Is a One Two Punch of Anti-tTG Tests a Reliable Way to Diagnose Celiac Disease?

      Does sequential testing with different tissue transglutaminase antibodies offer an effective a new approach for diagnosing celiac disease?

    Caption: Does sequential testing with different tissue transglutaminase antibodies offer an effective a new approach for diagnosing celiac disease? Photo: CC--Randy Heinitz

    Celiac.com 02/01/2018 - To make a clinical diagnosis of celiac disease, doctors use serological testing for IgA antibodies to human tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) which indicate celiac disease autoimmunity. However, some tests are more highly sensitive for anti-tTG, while other tests are highly specific. So, is combining two tests a reliable strategy for screening for celiac disease in clinical practice?

    A team of researchers recently compared the performance of three kits used to diagnose celiac disease, and evaluated the point prevalence of celiac disease autoimmunity in a South Indian urban population.

    The research team included G Venugopal, J Mechenro, G Makharia, A Singh, S Pugazhendhi, R Balamurugan, and BS Ramakrishna. They are variously associated with the SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Salai, Vadapalani in Chennai, India, the SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, India, the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi, India, the Kansas University Medical Center, Kansas City KS, USA, the Indian Institute of Technology, Samantapuri, Bhubaneswar, India, the SRM Institutes for Medical Science, Jawaharlal Nehru Salai, Vadapalani, Chennai, India, and with the SRM Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Kattankulathur, India.

    For the first part of their study, the team performed anti-tTG testing on sera from 90 patients with documented celiac disease and 92 healthy controls using three different kits.

    They then tested one thousand nine hundred and seventeen healthy adults residents of the Vellore and Kancheepuram districts for celiac disease autoimmunity using a sequential two-test strategy.

    Based on these results, the team suggests that using first a highly sensitive test for anti-tTG followed by a highly specific test is a reliable strategy for screening for celiac disease in clinical practice.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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