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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/28/2017 - After 14-day gluten challenge, an HLA-DQ-gluten tetramer blood test provides better detection of celiac disease than biopsy. Can that lead to new disease detection methods in patients who are already on a gluten-free diet?
    Doctors attempting to diagnose celiac disease are often confronted by patients who have already given up gluten. For such patients, diagnostic guidelines currently call for a gluten challenge of at least 14 days, followed by duodenal biopsy. There isn't much good data on how many false-positive results are generated by this method. To get a better picture, a team of researchers recently studied responses to 14-day gluten challenge in subjects with treated celiac disease.
    The research team included Vikas K Sarna, Gry I Skodje, Henrik M Reims, Louise F Risnes, Shiva Dahal-Koirala, Ludvig M Sollid, and Knut E A Lundin. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; K. G. Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Clinical Service, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway; Centre for Immune Regulation, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, Norway; and the Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
    The research team took a group of 20 patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease, all in confirmed mucosal remission, and presented them with a dietary gluten challenge of 5.7 grams per oral gluten per day for 14 days, then conducted duodenal biopsies. They analyzed blood by multiplex assay for cytokine detection, and by flow cytometry using HLA-DQ:gluten tetramers.
    Nineteen of the twenty participants completed the challenge. Biopsy results showed villous blunting in 5 of those 19 patients. Villous height to crypt depth ratio reduced with at least 0.4 concomitantly with an increase in intraepithelial lymphocyte count of at least 50% in 9 of the 19 patients. Interleukin-8 plasma concentration increased by more than 100% after 4 hours in 7 of 19 subjects. Frequency of blood CD4+effector-memory gut-homing HLA-DQ:gluten tetramer-binding T cells increased by more than 100% on day 6 in 12 of 15 evaluated participants.
    For most celiac patients, a 14-day gluten challenge did not result in sufficient mucosal architectural changes for clear diagnosis (sensitivity ≈25%–50%).
    The team found that an increase in CD4+ effector-memory gut-homing HLA-DQ:gluten tetramer-binding T cells in blood 6 days after gluten challenge is a more sensitive and less invasive biomarker for celiac disease.
    The team is calling for further study. Being able to diagnose celiac disease without biopsy could really help to improve the entire diagnostic process, and could easily lead to an increase in diagnosis.
    Source:
    Gut

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/11/2017 - The FDA has granted clearance for Immco Diagnostics' ELISA for celiac disease, and for Roche's Benchtop Analyzer. What does that mean?
    Immco's test is conducted as a solid phase immunoassay and is intended for the qualitative or semiquantitative detection of IgA or IgG antigliadin antibodies in human blood, and thus to aid in diagnosing patients with celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis in conjunction with other laboratory and clinical findings.
    In other important diagnostic news, a benchtop analyzer from Roche Diagnostics and an immunoassay system from Shenzhen New Industries Biomedical was among the instruments and tests cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration in July, according to the agency. The FDA granted 510(k) clearance to Roche's Cobas b 101 instrument platform, as well as the Cobas HbA1c test. The fully automated and self-contained Cobas b 101 uses a single-use reagent disc to measure HbA1c from capillary and/or venous whole-blood samples, according to a document filed with the FDA.
    The Cobas HbA1c is an in vitro diagnostic test for detecting the presence of glycate hemoglobin, which develops when hemoglobin joins with glucose in the blood, becoming 'glycated'. By measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), clinicians are able to get an overall picture of what our average blood sugar levels have been over a period of weeks/months.
    For people with diabetes this is important as the higher the HbA1c, the greater the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. The HbA1c assay is designed for use with the Cobas b 101 platform, which is not a portable home test, but is intended for a clinical laboratory or point-of-care setting.
    Other instruments receiving FDA clearance in July include a new flow cytometer from Becton Dickinson; an expanded version of Bruker's MALDI Biotyper; and expanded indications for BioMérieux's Vitek MS MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometery System. The FDA recently cleared the Maglumi 2000 automated immunoassay analyzer from Shenzhen New Industries Biomedical, which uses chemiluminescent technology for running IVD tests on clinical serum samples. The firm's Maglumi 2000 TSH assay for the quantitative determination of thyroid-stimulating hormone in human serum also received 510(k) clearance. The assay is for diagnosing thyroid disorders.
    These are just a few of many new tests and analysis devices that are changing the way doctors diagnose and manage celiac disease, diabetes, and other diseases.
    Look for tests like this to have a profound influence on the way diseases are diagnosed and managed in the future.
    Read more: 360dx.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/13/2017 - ImmusanT, Inc., the company working to develop a therapeutic vaccine to protect HLADQ2.5+ patients with celiac disease against the effects of gluten, presented data that shows a way to tell the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitive (NCGS) based on cytokine levels.
    Professor Knut Lundin, University of Oslo, presented the data at United European Gastroenterology (UEG) Week 2017.
    The results are important, in part because many people go on a gluten-free diet before they ever get diagnosed with celiac disease. It's hard for doctors to ask these people to start eating gluten again so that they can be properly diagnosed. But that's how it currently works. If there are no anti-gliadin antibodies in your blood, current tests are not accurate.
    These data suggest that it is possible to spot celiac disease through plasma or blood test. Along with easier, more accurate celiac diagnoses, a blood test would be a major breakthrough because "patients would only be required to consume gluten on one occasion and would still achieve accurate results," said Robert Anderson, MBChB, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of ImmusanT.
    The test may also help people who do not have celiac disease, but find symptom relief on a gluten-free diet. For these people, gluten may not be the cause of their symptoms and a gluten-free diet may be totally unnecessary.
    The latest data support the company's approach to "developing a simple blood test for diagnosing celiac disease without the discomfort and inconvenience of current testing methods. This would be the first biomarker for measuring systemic T-cell immunity to gluten," said Leslie Williams, Chief Executive Officer of ImmusanT.
    As development is ongoing, further tests are expected to flesh out the details.
    Source:
    Immusant

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/22/2018 - Celiac disease is marked by HLA-DQ2/8-restricted responses of CD4+ T cells to gluten from wheat, barley or rye.
    Currently, in order to properly diagnose celiac disease based on serology and duodenal histology doctors need patients to be on gluten-containing diets. This is a problem for many people, who prefer not to begin ingesting wheat again once they have adopted a gluten-free diet. This can present challenges for doctors attempting to diagnose celiac disease.
    It is known that HLA-DQ–gluten tetramers can be used to detect gluten-specific T cells in the blood of patients with celiac disease, even if they are on a gluten-free diet. The team set out to determine if an HLA-DQ–gluten tetramer-based assay can accurately identify patients with celiac disease.
    The research team included Vikas K. Sarna, Knut E.A. Lundin, Lars Mørkrid, Shuo-Wang Qiao, Ludvig M. Sollid, and Asbjørn Christophersen. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunology, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Norway; the KG Jebsen Coeliac Disease Research Centre, University of Oslo, Norway; the Department of Gastroenterology, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Norway; the Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Norway; and with the Centre for Immune Regulation, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet and University of Oslo, Norway.
    For their study, the team produced HLA-DQ–gluten tetramers and added them to peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from 143 HLA-DQ2.5+ subjects. There were a total of 62 subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, 19 subjects without celiac disease on a gluten-free diet due to perceived sensitivity, 10 subjects with celiac disease on a non-gluten-free diet, and 52 seemingly healthy individuals as control subjects.
    The team used flow cytometry to measure T cells that bound HLA-DQ–gluten tetramers. They then used researchers blinded to sample type, except for samples from subjects with celiac disease on a gluten-containing diet, to conduct laboratory tests and flow cytometry gating analyses. They also conducted analysis on test precision using samples from 10 subjects.
    They found that an HLA-DQ–gluten tetramer-based test that detects gluten-reactive T cells identifies patients with and without celiac disease with a high level of accuracy, regardless of whether patients are on a gluten-free diet.
    This test could conceivably allow celiac diagnosis while suspected patients are still on a gluten-free diet. The team notes that their results require a larger study for validation.
    Could reliable celiac diagnosis be done without making patients consume gluten? Will that become common? Stay tuned for more developments.
    Source:
    Gastrojournal.org

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    It’s so awful isn’t it. Do you ever get dizziness and a numb face? Mines just awful atm and I constantly think oh it must be something more serious   It’s so awful isn’t it. Do you ever get dizziness and a numb face? Mines just awful atm and Iconstantly think oh it must besomething more serious  
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