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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    Gene Ther 2003 May;10(10):835-43
    Londei M, Quaratino S, Maiuri L.
    Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.
    Celiac.com 05/29/2003 - This highly technical and hopeful article covers the possibility of using gene therapy to one day cure celiac disease. Here are the introduction and final words:
    "Gene therapy (GT) is still at the experimental stage and some recent setbacks have cooled the potential use of this therapeutic tool even in life-threatening conditions. However, this therapeutic approach has a potential, which is not limited to disease for which we have not other option. There are increasing evidence that GT will be soon used in diseases that are not life threatening. One group of diseases that can benefit from GT is the autoimmune one. Several experimental animal models have indicated the efficacy (proof of principle) of GT. In the present review, we have addressed the possibility that even extremely benign autoimmune-like diseases such as Celiac Disease (celiac disease) might one day profit from this type of therapy. We further point that in conditions such as celiac disease, where the trigger is well known and the pathogenic cascade is relatively well defined, a situation not common in autoimmunity, we can even have a better situation where to explore and use GT to control disease initiation and progression. Once the risks that are still intrinsic to GT will have been reduced the therapeutic options we outline in the present review might not appear too far from reality."
    "celiac disease is the prototype of diseases in which a clear role of antigen-specific T cells has been demonstrated and where their inhibition results in disease amelioration. The present therapeutic approach is the removal of the antigenic challenge: the gluten-free diet, which is effective if there is a strict compliance to the diet. It is, however, not always easy to follow such strict restrictions for all life and alternative approaches have to be considered. The use of GT is at the moment a remote hypothesis as celiac disease is a relatively benign condition, with a valid therapeutic approach and GT has intrinsic risks that have been highlighted recently. The scope of this review is, however, to indicate a future application of GT when, as they will, the present limitations and intrinsic risks of GT will be overcome."


    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 03/04/2004 - Kimball Genetics is pleased to announce availability of the One-Day Celiac Disease DNA Test for cheek cell specimens in addition to blood. Cheek cell specimens are popular with both patients and physicians because they eliminate the need for a blood draw and are convenient to collect and ship. Kimball Genetics unique ability to perform celiac disease testing on cheek cells enables direct-to-consumer marketing of this service.

    Celiac disease is a chronic, autoimmune, gastrointestinal disorder. In genetically susceptible individuals, ingestion of gluten-containing grains, especially wheat, causes inflammation of the small intestine mucosa and leads to malabsorption. Long believed to be a rare disorder, celiac disease is now known to be one of the most common, under-diagnosed diseases, affecting 1:120-1:300 individuals in European and North American populations. Early detection through antibody and genetic testing and subsequent elimination of gluten from the diet is essential in aiding prevention and treatment.

    Due to the extremely variable presentation of disease symptoms and severity, diagnosing celiac disease is difficult. Antiendomysial and tissue transglutaminase antibody test results can be equivocal depending upon diet adherence and stage of disease. Kimball Genetics One-Day Celiac Disease DNA Test is a reliable and critical tool for accurately diagnosing celiac disease.

    Kimball Genetics One-Day Celiac Disease DNA Test includes highest accuracy of testing, one-day turnaround time, detailed test reports, free genetic counseling for physicians and patients, and excellent personal service

    For more information about the Celiac Disease DNA Test, please contact Juli Murphy, M.S. at (800) 320-1807 or at jamurphy@kimballgenetics.com.

    About Kimball Genetics, Inc.

    Kimball Genetics, Inc., is an independent genetic testing laboratory with a national reputation for combining the highest accuracy of testing with unparalleled turnaround time and excellent personal service. Founded in 1994 by Annette K. Taylor, M.S., Ph.D., Kimball Genetics has distinguished itself from other molecular diagnostic labs by its one-day turnaround time and unique emphasis on genetic counseling and education. For: Kimball Genetics, Inc., 101 University Blvd., Suite 350, Denver, CO 80206
    Contact: Juli Murphy, M.S., (800) 320-1807

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/10/2007 - A study published recently in the journal of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics shows that the paracellular permeability inhibitor AT-1001 effectively reduces intestinal barrier dysfunction, proinflammatory cytokine production, and gastrointestinal symptoms in people who have celiac disease. At present, a lifetime devoted to following a strict gluten-free diet is the backbone of current treatment for celiac disease. However, as researchers have come to know more about celiac disease, they’re insights are leading to developments that offer more effective prognosis and treatment of the disease.
    One of those promising new approaches involves treating celiac patients with doses of AT-1001, a paracellular permeability inhibitor that is structurally derived from a protein secreted by Vibrio cholerae. Recently, a team of medical researchers set out to assess the safety and tolerability of 12 mg doses of AT-1001 in people with celiac disease who submitted to acute gluten exposure.
    For the in-patient, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled safety study, researchers looked at twenty men and women with celiac disease and measured intestinal permeability, through fractional excretions of lactulose and mannitol, as an exploratory measure of the efficacy of AT-1001 in treating celiac disease.
    The test subjects were men and women with age ranging from 18 to 59 years old. Each was pre-screened and referred by a gastroenterologist. Each had positive biopsy and antibody screens that indicated celiac disease. Each had also been on a gluten-free diet at least six months, was not known to be IgA deficient, and presented with anti-tTG titres of <10 EU at enrollment.
    Study shows safety and tolerability of 12 mg doses of AT-1001 in celiac disease
    In the placebo group, acute gluten exposure brought an observable 70% increase in intestinal permeability, compared to no change at all in the AT-1001 group. Four of seven patients (57%) of the placebo group showed increased levels of Interferon-gamma levels, but in the AT-1001 group only four of 14 patients (29%) showed such increases. Also, the placebo group showed gastrointestinal symptoms more frequently than the AT-1001 group (P = 0.018).
    From the results, the researchers concluded that AT-1001 is well tolerated and appears to reduce intestinal barrier dysfunction, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and gastrointestinal symptoms in celiac patients subjected to gluten exposure.
    Aliment Pharmacol Ther 26, 757-766
    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Melissa Reed
    Celiac.com 08/19/2014 - It is common for many people with celiac disease to have vitamin deficiencies. Eating a wide variety of foods such as meat, fish, eggs and vegetables can assist in with fixing those deficiencies. Children need vitamins to promote growth, development and good immune health. As adults we need them to prevent disease and stay healthy.
    First, including small amounts of free-range, grass-fed beef in the diet will help you recover from iron deficiency. Fresh fish may help lower cholesterol, as it contains healthy omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D. Egg whites from free range hens are high in protein and omega-3 fatty acids. Eating a balanced diet is the best way to receive the daily allowance of vitamins, rather than taking supplements, although many celiacs will also need to take supplements for some time to fully recover.
    Next, vegetables supply vitamins and minerals, contain no cholesterol, and are low in calories. Vegetables that are colorful are very important in the daily diet. Bell peppers, broccoli and string beans are good sources of vitamin A. Fresh dark green leafy vegetables like kale are a strong source of folic acid, which assist in red blood cell formation. Spinach is full of vitamin D, Iron and Calcium. Vegetables are also high in complex carbohydrates and fiber. Try Romaine and dark leafy green lettuce for salads, as they will have more nutrients than Iceberg lettuce, which has a high amount of water and sodium.
    Last, what are some of the best methods for cooking food to keep the most vitamins and nutrients in them? Steaming vegetables can retain the majority of nutrients, while boiling them can overcook them and cause a loss of vitamins. Try to cook vegetables, poultry and fish without extra fat by steaming them over low sodium broth, instead of water. Another healthy alternative is to stir fry vegetables. Since stir fry uses a small amount of oil, it is a fast and low-fat method to cook meals. The best part about cooking with the stir fry method is that food will retain vitamins and flavor better, since it is a fast healthy alternative.
    Always talk with a doctor about dietary needs before making changes to your diet, and have your doctor test you for celiac disease before going on a gluten-free diet.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au