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    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    Scott Adams' Story of His Diagnosis of Celiac Disease


    Scott Adams

    Like many people with celiac disease, I spent a lot of years and money to go through many tests and misdiagnoses before doctors finally found my problem. Because of the large variety of symptoms associated with celiac disease, diagnosis can be very difficult. Most medical doctors are taught to look for classic symptoms and often make a wrong diagnosis, or no diagnosis at all.


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    During my doctor visits my diet was never discussed, even though most of my symptoms were digestive in nature. My symptoms included abdominal pain, especially in the middle-right section while sleeping, bloating, and diarrhea (off and on over a period of several years). A simple (and free!) exclusionary diet would have quickly revealed my problem. An exclusionary diet involves eliminating wheat, rye, oats, barley, dairy products, soy and eggs for several weeks, and recording any reaction as one slowly adds these foods back to their diet.

    It took two years for the doctors to discover that I had celiac disease. During that time I was misdiagnosed with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), told that I could have cancer or a strange form of Leukemia, treated for a non-existent ulcer with a variety of antibiotics that made me very ill, and was examined for a possible kidney problem. I also underwent many unnecessary and expensive tests including CAT Scans, thyroid tests, tests for bacterial infections and parasites, ultrasound scans, and gall bladder tests. Luckily I ended up reading something about celiac disease in a book on nutrition, which led me to ask my doctor to test me for it. I was finally diagnosed via a biopsy of my small intestine (which is not as bad as it sounds). Although the biopsy is still considered the gold standard of diagnosis, there are also several blood tests for celiac disease.

    I decided to create this Website to help others avoid a similar ordeal. I also want to provide people who know they have the problem with information which will improve their quality of life, and broaden their culinary horizons. To do this, I have compiled information from a large variety of sources including medical journals, books, doctors, scientists and the Celiac Listserv News Group, and posted it all right here. Please remember that I am not a doctor, and none of this information should be considered expert medical advice....enjoy! - Scott Adams



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    Recommended Comments

    Guest Catherine

    Posted

    Hi there. I guess you've heard this time and time again, but your site is great! I too went through many, many years of mis-diagnosis - almost died. Turns out that at least 2/3 of my family have it also. Thanks for the site and the help. I'm still fighting symptoms and yes, I'm completely gluten-free but the docs say it may be possible that I have Celiac as a secondary disease.....but they still can't figure out the first.

     

    Thanks again and wish me luck. I need a diagnosis and soon.

     

    Catherine

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    Thank you so, so much for this incredibly helpful website! I was just diagnoses with celiac disease a few weeks ago, and as a newbie I'm relying heavily on your lists of safe vs. unsafe ingredients. Thank you, thank you, thank you!! :-)

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    Guest Jane Claflin

    Posted

    Dear website, I have been severely ill since 1998-99. They diagnosed me with a brain disorder called Arnold Chiari Malformation 1. I had three major brain surgeries for the pain. I have suffered all these years and no answer from any gastro doctors or surgeons. Walked into my new GP other day and she said have you heard about celiac sprue. I am floored and thanking God I have finally received and answer from heaven!!! All these years of being bedridden are fixing to be gone and I can live a normal life!This website has given me my life back and one simple word of advice by a doctor after hundreds of them had written me off as crazy. No more pain!!!! Thank you Jesus and Scott for giving me my life back im 48 years old and spend 7-8 years in bed with debilitating pain. There are no words to describe how I feel right now. My sister has same problems too they will be floored to know there is an answer now. Thank You from all my heart, Jane in Texas!!!

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    Guest BackCheck48

    Posted

    Thanks for the site bro! found tons of info that has really helped food wise. I think i have it easy. No symptoms, regular blood work showed low iron and some other stuff so a scope was ordered and I was confirmed as a celiac. (my sister has it and the doc was on the ball so he had the biopsy done) funny thing was that I felt fine, I have always had tons of energy and am never tired. I've been gluten free for about 10 days and I feel even better. I traded my Guinness for jack and coke!!

     

    'take the shortest route to the puck and arrive in ill humor.'

     

    Cordially,

    MEF

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    Guest naomi putticvk

    Posted

    After reading your story Scott I am convinced hat I now have an answer to my problems. I have suffered bloating pain in my right side and intermittent diarrhea for many years now. I am also lactose intolerant and so follow to the best of my ability that kind of diet, so when I next see my doctor in ten days time I will ask him to test me for it. Once again thank you Naomi Switzerland. PS Will keep you up to date on final diagnosis

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    Guest JCarter

    Posted

    Thanks for the website. I have been having progressively worsening symptoms over the past few years that have been escalating over the past few months. I never would have considered celiac disease. Interestingly, when I feel truly terrible I will stay on a clear liquid diet and perk right up - then fall into the same eating patterns and feel terrible. I have had diagnostic tests that to date have been negative. I have an appointment with a GI specialist today and will surely ask him to test me for celiac disease - I am miserable!

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    Guest Charline

    Posted

    Dear Scott,

    I love your site and all your helpful info. I am a mother of a newly diagnosed 8 year old celiac sufferer. I however feel confused even though I trust his gastroenterologist from Children's. So I was hoping you might help me if you could find the time to respond to my question. My son had problems since he was a baby with some type of intolerance but no allergies. Severe reflux as well. Constipation with bleeding off and, and stomach pain after eating which led me to seek a specialist. One antibody was 14 (supposed to be <4) and biopsy showed high lymphocytes, immune cell presence, BUT NO DAMAGE to the VILLI in his small intestine. This is why I am confused. I know he has some autoimmune disorder as I have several (not celiac though) but I want to be 100% sure this is the correct diagnosis before I put him on this diet for the rest of his life. I am sorry for imposing on you but I have dealt with so many doctors with my own health problems. Even hearing I was looking for something to be wrong when I had 3 miscarriages! This was a top doctor from a renowned university. IF, you can find the time to briefly guide me in this difficult diagnosis I would be so greatly thankful. Again, your site is so helpful and I plan on ordering plenty of food soon! Keep up the great work and best to you and your progress!

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    This is an amazing site. I needed to know different recipes and what foods my daughter needs to avoid. She has just gone through so much and had a biopsy yesterday. She is only 8 years old and has lost 6 lbs. and always has chronic stomach pains and loose bowel movements. We should find out the results in a few weeks but she has started today on a wheat free diet. She loves banana bread and was sad she couldn't eat it anymore until we found this site. She loves the new banana bread more than the old type with wheat in it.

    Thank you very much for all this much needed incredible information for a parent learning to care for her child.

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    Guest Rachel

    Posted

    I have found this website very informative and helpful. I was diagnosed with celiac disease right before Christmas. I have been misdiagnosed with IBS for 10 years and finally my body gave up and I lost 30 lbs within 2 months. My new doctor finally took me serious and diagnosed me through blood tests and small intestine biopsy. I am eating gluten free and still having weight loss and still waking up sick every single day, hopefully they help soon. You website gave me a lot of new information. Thank you!

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    Guest Vivian, PT

    Posted

    Dear Scott,

    I love your site and all your helpful info. I am a mother of a newly diagnosed 8 year old celiac sufferer. I however feel confused even though I trust his gastroenterologist from Children's. So I was hoping you might help me if you could find the time to respond to my question. My son had problems since he was a baby with some type of intolerance but no allergies. Severe reflux as well. Constipation with bleeding off and, and stomach pain after eating which led me to seek a specialist. One antibody was 14 (supposed to be <4) and biopsy showed high lymphocytes, immune cell presence, BUT NO DAMAGE to the VILLI in his small intestine. This is why I am confused. I know he has some autoimmune disorder as I have several (not celiac though) but I want to be 100% sure this is the correct diagnosis before I put him on this diet for the rest of his life. I am sorry for imposing on you but I have dealt with so many doctors with my own health problems. Even hearing I was looking for something to be wrong when I had 3 miscarriages! This was a top doctor from a renowned university. IF, you can find the time to briefly guide me in this difficult diagnosis I would be so greatly thankful. Again, your site is so helpful and I plan on ordering plenty of food soon! Keep up the great work and best to you and your progress!

    It is a common misconception that celiac disease is only confined to the small intestines but it is not based on the seminar I attended in the past. If he's already having problems with digestion, most likely he's starting to have the signs and symptoms of gluten sensitivity. Celiac disease is the end stage of gluten sensitivity. There are also manual therapy techniques available and the one I use is called integrative manual therapy along with NAET (Nambudripad's Allergy Elimination Technique) which could help detect where the problem is coming from. Hope this helps answer some of your questions.

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    Guest Kathleen

    Posted

    I gained 10 pounds and had severe abdominal bloating this spring. I've had intermittent problems with diarrhea and constipation over the years. My doctor had a CT scan that showed an enlarged ovary so I was given an internal ultrasound. I had a hemorrhagic cyst but it was not the problem. My doctor sent me to a gastroenterology specialist and he suggested an upper endoscopy, looking for ulcers or polyps. He also did a stomach and intestinal biopsy. The biopsy came back positive for Celiac. I am having blood work done today to confirm and check my gluten levels. I am 50 years old and although I am glad I have a diagnosis, I am having a hard time with the complete change of lifestyle. I have always loved to cook and bake and now I have to modify everything. I often travel with my husband, and this can now be a problem when I travel to places like Africa. I am grateful for this website. I would like to see something on how to adjust to the radical changes one has to make, especially someone my age! Thank you.

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    Guest Sally Dellas

    Posted

    I have found this website very informative and helpful. I was diagnosed with celiac disease right before Christmas. I have been misdiagnosed with IBS for 10 years and finally my body gave up and I lost 30 lbs within 2 months. My new doctor finally took me serious and diagnosed me through blood tests and small intestine biopsy. I am eating gluten free and still having weight loss and still waking up sick every single day, hopefully they help soon. You website gave me a lot of new information. Thank you!

    Hi Rachel,

    Hope you are feeling better by now as it's been over four months since your post. It took me several months before I was finally gluten free. I didn't realize that things like soy sauce and root beer and modified food starch contained gluten.

    Little by little, I discovered all the things that were causing me trouble.

    It sure feels good not to feel bad!

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    Guest Sally Dellas

    Posted

    Hi Kathleen,

    I was 68 when I finally got diagnosed six years ago. I never was too crazy about pasta, bread, and pastries, so I don't miss that, except for some good French or Italian bread now and then.

    Actually, the gluten free diet is a really healthy one, as you can't eat much processed food. Lots of fresh fruits and veggies, brown rice and corn, lean meat, chicken and fish, and dairy products if you don't happen to be lactose intolerant. And even if you are, there are lactose free products or the pills you can take with dairy foods. I happen to LOVE Mexican food, so I'm in luck if I have to eat out. Just make sure there is no wheat in the tortillas or sauces.

    As far as baking goes, I was really getting into turning out piles of Christmas cookies and treats for the family when I" had to go gluten-free, so there went the baking. However, the web is a great source of gluten-free recipes. I make a great lemon sponge cake that is a good substitute for the angel food cake I always loved. And if you live near a Trader Joe's, they have a good gluten-free ginger snap cookie and also reasonably priced mixes for brownies and maybe cookies. I also miss stuffing. I bought some self-rising corn meal and make cornbread, which I then use as the base for the traditional stuffing with onions. celery, sage. etc. It works for me!

    Best of luck to you, and drop me a line and let me know how you're doing.

     

    Regards,

    Sally

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    I thank you so much for this website. I think it's terrific information for people with celiac disease

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    Guest Cathi

    Posted

    Any hope of adding information about those who are gluten free, corn free, soy free and need to be low carbohydrate diet also. It is so hard to find bread recipes or tortilla recipes that would fit this bill. Rice flour and all the starches are really high in carbohydrates.

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    Guest Gabrielle

    Posted

    My friend had stomach problems for over 20 years! The doctors didn't know what was wrong with her. They wrongly diagnosed her for IBS. I now found this website and she has been tested for Celiac two days ago. The results should come in today. Wish her luck!

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    Guest Linda

    Posted

    Thank you for your website and all the comments are helpful also.. I was diagnosed about 20 months ago and have been following gluten-free diet always! I must admit, if I didn't actually get so sick shortly thereafter it would likely be much more difficult to follow. But the thought of what it is to come immediately is probably even more powerful than the long term. I almost died and am grateful to be alive. I do worry terribly about the lack of nutrients since my intestine has not healed and I can receive none. It scares me I must admit and I fear I have had it for years and could be refractory. If you have any suggestions I am open for any and all ideas. Thank you for helping others like yourself!

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    Guest Anna Mae Schroeder

    Posted

    It is most interesting to read what people have to relate about their gluten sensitivity.

    But some folks do not read labels, or know exactly what ingredients contain wheat. It would be good to instruct readers about what ingredients are taboo. THANKS SO MUCH for this site!

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    Guest Cathy

    Posted

    Hi Scott, I contacted you in 1998 after receiving my diagnosis of being a celiac regarding gluten-free food and flours. I have been an avid reader since, and abstain from anything that could possibly have any gluten containing ingredients. I have regained my health after being diagnosed with IBS, gastroenteritis, duodenitis, anxiety, depression, had breast lumps removed, hysterectomy for massive bleeding, lipomas, and reactive arthritis reaction to antibiotics, lower back disc surgery ..... never did any physicians (even after colonoscopy for diarrhea) suggest celiac! Finally had diagnosis and it is truly amazing that I feel better than I have in my whole life since abstaining from gluten since 1998! The reason this is not better known is because there is no drug to advertise as a treatment, therefore no money to be made in pharma or medical world. Just imagine the evening commercials for a drug for celiac: " do you suffer from ...... ask your doctor if xxx is right for you!" All that is needed is abstaining from what is basically poison to your body. It's like NOT sprinkling a little ant poison on your food every day! Thanks so much! Cathy from CO

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    Guest kennedymoore

    Posted

    I gained 10 pounds and had severe abdominal bloating this spring. I've had intermittent problems with diarrhea and constipation over the years. My doctor had a CT scan that showed an enlarged ovary so I was given an internal ultrasound. I had a hemorrhagic cyst but it was not the problem. My doctor sent me to a gastroenterology specialist and he suggested an upper endoscopy, looking for ulcers or polyps. He also did a stomach and intestinal biopsy. The biopsy came back positive for Celiac. I am having blood work done today to confirm and check my gluten levels. I am 50 years old and although I am glad I have a diagnosis, I am having a hard time with the complete change of lifestyle. I have always loved to cook and bake and now I have to modify everything. I often travel with my husband, and this can now be a problem when I travel to places like Africa. I am grateful for this website. I would like to see something on how to adjust to the radical changes one has to make, especially someone my age! Thank you.

    I am 47 started suffering terribly in 1993 and was just diagnosed in 2010. I am always interested in what people actually mean when they say adjust to the changes after diagnosis. Changing my diet was easy. As I figured it out I chose vegetables, fish, shrimp, bake, broil, steam, grill. What was difficult was handling the emotional side of all of the suffering I had endured. I needed a safe place to just talk. I needed someone to hear me about, not think I was crazy. I wanted to understand how all of these doctors could have failed me. I saw several psychiatrist who just offered me medication - wrong answer. Saw 3-4 therapist who basically thought I should get over it - wrong answer. The only comfort was God, my faith and my Bible. The celiac disease support groups help with food choices and lifestyle changes, but I have not been able to identify an emotional healing celiac support group in the United States. I met an addiction therapist who really understands the emotional toll suffering causes. Through treating celiac patients he has come to understand the need for emotional healing. The more we heal emotionally the better we are able to adjust to a new found opportunity for improved health. He is in the process of creating an emotional healing support group for celiacs. I hope that since 2009 you have received the emotional support that we all need and some help with lifestyle changes.

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    Your site says that ALL wines are safe for celiac. Then why do ALL other sites say that some do contain gluten?

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    Your site says that ALL wines are safe for celiac. Then why do ALL other sites say that some do contain gluten?

    We are aware of the claim, the problem is that none have ever tested positive for gluten, and I challenge the other sites to produce such a test. Winemakers don't want gluten in their wine...would be a big mess.

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    Hi Kathleen,

    I was 68 when I finally got diagnosed six years ago. I never was too crazy about pasta, bread, and pastries, so I don't miss that, except for some good French or Italian bread now and then.

    Actually, the gluten free diet is a really healthy one, as you can't eat much processed food. Lots of fresh fruits and veggies, brown rice and corn, lean meat, chicken and fish, and dairy products if you don't happen to be lactose intolerant. And even if you are, there are lactose free products or the pills you can take with dairy foods. I happen to LOVE Mexican food, so I'm in luck if I have to eat out. Just make sure there is no wheat in the tortillas or sauces.

    As far as baking goes, I was really getting into turning out piles of Christmas cookies and treats for the family when I" had to go gluten-free, so there went the baking. However, the web is a great source of gluten-free recipes. I make a great lemon sponge cake that is a good substitute for the angel food cake I always loved. And if you live near a Trader Joe's, they have a good gluten-free ginger snap cookie and also reasonably priced mixes for brownies and maybe cookies. I also miss stuffing. I bought some self-rising corn meal and make cornbread, which I then use as the base for the traditional stuffing with onions. celery, sage. etc. It works for me!

    Best of luck to you, and drop me a line and let me know how you're doing.

     

    Regards,

    Sally

    Any chance on posting the recipe for the sponge cake? I loved to make elaborate cakes before I was diagnosed about 6 months ago. I'm still learning how to live with this!

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  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams

    (Celiac.com 08/13/2000) Because celiac disease has emerged as a public health problem, Swedish researchers conducted a study to analyze the trends in the occurrence of symptomatic celiac disease in Swedish children from 1973 to 1997, and to explore any temporal relationship to changes in infant dietary patterns. The researchers established a population-based prospective incidence register of celiac disease in 1991, and collected data retrospective date from 1973. A total of 2,151 cases met their diagnostic criteria, and were used in the study.
    In addition the researchers collected national data on an annual basis regarding the duration of breastfeeding and intake of gluten-containing cereals and recommendations on when and how to introduce gluten to the diets of infants. The incidence of celiac disease in children below 2 years of age increased fourfold (200-240 cases per 100,000 person years) between 1985 and 1987, followed in 1995 by a sharp decline to the previous level (50-60 cases per 100,000 person years). A pattern like this one is quite unique for a chronic disease of immunological pathogenesis, which suggests that prevention could be possible.
    This study demonstrates that the celiac disease epidemic is in part the result of a change in three factors within the area of infant feeding, including the amount of gluten given, the age of gluten introduction, and whether breastfeeding was ongoing or not when it was introduced. There may also be additional factors involved, and the search for them should be intensified.
    Ivarsson A, Persson LA, Nystrom L, et al
    Acta Paediatr. 2000 Feb;89(2):165-71

    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 07/30/2007 - A study published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology suggests that a newly proposed system of classifying duodenal pathology on celiac disease provides an improved inter-observation than the less Marsh-Oberhuber classification, and offers an advance towards making a simpler, better, more valid diagnosis of celiac disease. Celiac disease is presently classified according to the Marsh-Oberhuber system of classifying duodenal lesions.
    Recently, a more elementary method has been suggested. That method is based on three villous morphologies—non-atrophic, atrophic with villous crypto ratio <3:1, and atrophic, villi idnetectable—combined with intraepithelial counts of >25/100 enterocytes.
    The study team chose a group of sixty people to be part of the study. Of the 60 patients the team studied, 46 were female and 14 were male. The average age was 28.2 years with a mean range of 1-78 years. 10 people had celiac disease, 13 had celiac disease with normal villi, but a pathological increase in epithelial lymphocytes >25/100 & hyperplastic crypts. 37 patients had celiac disease with villous aptrophy.
    Patients were given biopsies, with at least 4 biopsies were taken from the second part of the duodenum. Biopsies were fixed in formalin and processed according to standard procedures, with cuts at six levels, and stained with hematoxylin resin. The slides were sent randomly to 6 pathologists who were blind to one another.
    The results showed that this new method of classification yielded better inter-observer agreement and more accurate diagnosis that the more difficult Marsh-Oberhuber system.
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2007;5:838–843
    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/04/2010 - The practice of using antibody testing to diagnose celiac disease has led to an explosion in the number of cases detected among children, coupled with a rise in median age at diagnosis, a new study suggests.
    European studies have shown that celiac disease is a multi-system disorder, affecting 0.3% to 1.0% of all children. A team of researchers recently set out to examine the impact of serological testing on childhood celiac disease in North America The research team consisted of Kelly E. McGowan, BHSc, Derek A. Castiglione and J. Decker Butzner, MD with the Department of Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
    Serological testing makes it easier to spot children with atypical or extra-intestinal symptoms or with conditions associated with celiac disease. Serological testing has resulted in a huge increase in celiac disease cases; it has tripled incidence levels, quadrupled diagnosis age, and brought about a greater understanding of the wide variety of presentations of celiac disease in North America.
    Younger children are more likely to develop classic celiac disease, whereas older children seem more likely to show atypical presentations.
    The goal of the study was to determine the effects of immunoglobulin A endomysial antibody testing on the incidence and clinical presentation of childhood celiac disease.
    Researchers compared the incidence and clinical presentation of celiac disease in two groups of patients. Both groups were under a pretesting group of patients under 18 years of age in 1990–1996  and compared with a testing group of  patients under 18 years of age in 2000–2006.
    Average age at diagnosis was 2 years (95% confidence interval: 2–4 years) in the pretest group (N = 36), compared with 9 years (95% confidence interval: 8–10 years) in the test group (N = 199; P < .001); female/male ratios (1.6:1) were similar (P = .982).
    Incidence of celiac disease increased from 2.0 cases per 100,000 children in the pretest group to 7.3 cases per 100,000 children in the test group (P = .0256).
    Frequency of classic celiac disease decreased from 67% in the pretest group to 19% (test group; P < .001), but the incidence of classic celiac disease did not change (0.8 vs 1.6 cases per 100000; P = .154).
    In the test group, researchers uncovered 13 previously unnoticed clinical presentations in 98 children, including 35 with family history, 18 with abdominal pain, and 14 with type 1 diabetes mellitus.
    The frequency of Marsh IIIc lesions decreased from 64% in the pretest group to 44% in the test group (P = .0403).
    In the test group, classic celiac disease was most common, making up 67% of cases in young children under 3 years, whereas atypical gastrointestinal and silent presentations were more common in older children.
    Overall, the contribution of serological testing to the diagnosis of celiac disease has been enormous. Antibody testing for celiac disease has tripled the incidence of celiac disease and quadrupled the average age at diagnosis, thus offering millions of children a higher quality of health.
    Source: Pediatrics, December 2009.


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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
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    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com