• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,681
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Roxanne Bracknell
    Newest Member
    Roxanne Bracknell
    Joined
  • 0

    Vitamin D Deficiency May be Affecting Celiacs' Immune Systems by Laura Wesson


    Scott Adams


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    This article appeared in the Winter 2007 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.

    Celiac.com 04/26/2007 - My fingernails were shredding and I was a bit out of it mentally, missing obvious things. I’ve had to stop eating many foods because I have intolerances to almost everything I used to eat before I went gluten-free, and I wondered if I had dropped some essential nutrients when I cleared all of those foods out of my diet. So I checked my diet for nutrient deficiencies, using the USDA nutrients database at www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search. I’m sure there’s software that works with this database but I wrote a little computer program to analyze my diet. I have an electronic food scale, so weighing food is easy.

    The most important thing I found is that I’m low on vitamin D. You can get vitamin D from food, or from a supplement, and from the ultraviolet B in sunlight; many of us, like me, may get almost none from any of those sources. And—this is important for a lot of us—vitamin D deficiency can cause a lot of symptoms including immune system problems! I went looking on Medline and it was mentioned as having anti-inflammatory properties, as preventing cancers such as colon cancer and lymphoma; preventing infections, and helping with autoimmune diseases. Gluten intolerance is less common in the middle east and more common in northern Europe. I’ve seen this explained as the result of evolution, since wheat has been used for longer in the Middle East. But I wonder if people in the north are also more likely to be gluten intolerant (an autoimmune disease) because they don’t get as much vitamin D. It may also explain why people get more colds during the winter season when there’s less sunlight. Vitamin D deficiency is best known for causing rickets in children and osteomalacia (softened bones, muscle weakness and pain, tender sternum) in adults. Osteomalacia is often misdiagnosed as fibromyalgia, because the symptoms are similar. Rickets is increasing in the U.S., especially among black children. Most post-menopausal bone loss in women occurs during the winter. It can take months of increased vitamin D intake to correct the health problems caused by deficiency.

    There are only a few significant dietary sources of vitamin D. In the U.S., almost all milk is fortified with vitamin D to 100 IU per cup, so you should get the recommended daily intake of 400 IU if you drink 4 cups of milk per day. However, milk often doesn’t have as much vitamin D as is claimed on the label. Some cereals, like Kellogg’s Cornflakes, have small amounts of added vitamin D. Typically, 10 cups of fortified cereal would give you the RDI. The government encourages fortification of milk and cereal so that fewer children will develop rickets. Otherwise—you would get the RDI from nine oysters, or about 4 ounces of fatty fish like salmon or tuna, or a teaspoon of cod liver oil. Many other kinds of fish have only small amounts. You’d have to eat 2 pounds of cod to get the RDI. The only natural vegan source of vitamin D is Shiitake mushrooms. Just like people, mushrooms make vitamin D when they’re exposed to ultraviolet. About 13 sun-dried shiitake mushrooms contain the RDI. And that’s it. Many of us on gluten-free diets are also not eating dairy or fortified cereals, so unless we have a passionate love-affair with fish or oysters or shiitake, we would be getting almost no vitamin D from food.

    You can get vitamin D the natural way, from the sun. It takes exposure to sunlight outside (not under glass) on your hands and feet for about fifteen minutes a day. I was not sure what was meant by “direct sunlight”. I read someplace that ultraviolet is scattered over the whole sky. Unlike visible light, the whole sky shines with ultraviolet. Clouds would filter out some of it. People with dark skin require more time in the sun, so many black people develop a deficiency. Using even low-SPF sunscreen prevents your body from making vitamin D. The farther from the equator you live, the less UVB there is in the winter sunlight, because the sun is closer to the horizon in the winter and the sunlight filters through more atmosphere before it gets to you. At the latitude of Boston, and near sea level, there isn’t enough UVB radiation between November and February for one’s body to make vitamin D.

    You have probably heard the public health advice to wear sunscreen—the same ultraviolet B that generates vitamin D in your body also causes skin cancer and ages skin. The small amount of exposure to sunlight required is probably only a very small cancer risk and would cause little photo-aging of the skin. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to find quantitative information about how carcinogenic fifteen minutes’ daily sun exposure would be. There are also vitamin D lights, which are probably also a healthful choice.

    I have severe immune system problems. I tested positive for 53 inhalant allergies—my body had developed allergies to almost all the allergens around. I get sick for days if I eat almost any of the foods that I ate while I was eating gluten. I even get sick from a couple of foods that, so far as I can remember, I only started eating on a gluten-free diet. So I live on an exotic-foods diet. I’ve had a hellish time trying to get allergy shots. At a concentration of 1 part in 10 million they make me sick for a couple of days while the normal starting concentration for allergy shots is 1 in 100,000. I’m plagued by bladder infections. With cranberries being one of my intolerances, I can’t even use them to help prevent the infections.

    I’ve certainly been short of vitamin D. I live in the north, and I’m always careful to use high-SPF sunscreen when I go outdoors. I can’t eat milk, fish, shellfish or mushrooms, so I can’t get a significant amount of vitamin D from food. I haven’t been taking any vitamin supplements, because almost all have traces of protein from some food that makes me sick. It would be lovely if vitamin D deficiency turned out to be part of the cause of my very burdensome immune problems. I’m skeptical because I was getting vitamin D from a supplement and/or from my diet up until 2 years ago, when I found I had a vast number of hidden food intolerances, and I started having reactions to vitamin pills. Fortunately there is a vitamin D supplement that I can take—vitamin D3 made by Pure Encapsulations. The ingredients in the capsule are made from wool and pine trees. I’ll find out if it helps over the next few months.

    Vitamin D causes disease when taken in large amounts, so if you think you are deficient, don’t take too much to make up for it. Vitamin D is a hormone—it’s not something to take in mega-doses, any more than, hopefully, one would take a mega-dose of estrogen or testosterone. If your doctor recommends a high dose, they should do regular blood tests to keep track of your vitamin D level. It’s pretty safe to take up to 2000 IU per day on your own. Dr. Michael Holick, a vitamin D researcher at Boston University and author of The UV Advantage, believes that people need about 1000 IU per day. I asked a family doctor, who said they suggest 400-800 IU per day for middle-aged women. However, it might be a good idea for gluten intolerant people to take more, about 1000 - 2000 IU per day, since we may have difficulties absorbing vitamins and celiac disease is an autoimmune disease.

    Vitamin D is very important, just as all the vitamins are. But we are conditioned by the media, and tend to think more about vitamins C and E, which get a lot of attention because they’re antioxidants. Vitamin D was the absolutely last one I looked at. Then I found that it was my most serious deficiency!  And nutrient deficiencies are not a trendy topic, so the possibility of developing deficiencies is something people tend to forget while trying to improve their diets. Many people who avoid gluten also have other food intolerances, or are on some other kind of special diet, and it would be an excellent idea to go to the USDA database and find out whether their new diet is giving them enough vitamins and minerals. It certainly helped me. I feel more cheerful and alert, like my mind woke up on a sunny day.

    It’s best to get as much as possible from one’s diet, too. Whole foods have a lot in them that’s good for the body that research hasn’t yet identified, and if your diet gives you the RDA of  all the vitamins and minerals, it will also be giving you other healthful nutrients that will do you a lot of good. This might also be true of vitamin D. Maybe it’s better to get a small amount of ultraviolet, like an iguana sitting under a UV lamp, instead of taking pills. UVB might be healthy in ways we don’t yet know about.

    Vitamin D is a bit like stored-up sunlight. You can catch it for yourself from the sun when it’s high in the sky, you can eat the sunlight the fish have gathered for you, or you can take a supplement and keep packed sunlight on your shelf.

    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Elena Stan

    Posted

    What a pleasure to read the article. It seems that you did your research good and I like your style of writing. I agree with you that sunlight is vital. And with everything else you talked about. Good job! My daughter is allergic to wheat, eggs and milk, but none of the doctors we saw for this wanted to help with advice. Celiac disease is a plague that most doctors don't even want to admit. I diagnosed my daughter myself initially, just by symptoms. I hope we will get it under control. The doctors only made the situation harder...

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    This article is very informative, helped me so much. Thank you!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Great article, but I'd lose the sunscreen part. Especially in the northern climes, the time you need in the sun isn't likely to cause skin cancer. The ingredients in the product would probably cause you more trouble than the sun!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Very informative. You mentioned Kellogg's corn flakes as a possible small source of Vitamin D . My understanding is that this product contains Maltodextrin (or something similar to that), and is not a gluten free item. I actually really liked this stuff, so I phoned their 1-800 number and they confirmed the non-gluten free status for this product.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Irene

    Posted

    Thanks for this article. I sympathize with you about your immune problems. I am the same way - plagued by bladder infections and facial cellulitis. My urologist recently started me on D-Mannose. It is a sugar molecule that attracts, like a magnet, bacteria in the bladder so it passes right through and doesn't get an opportunity to burrow into the bladder wall. It might be worth a try to see if it works for you.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Anita Lesniak

    Posted

    I'm so glad that I read this article as I am taking 50,000 of vitamin D a month and I have asked the doctor if he thought it was safe and he told me that it was now--I'm a little leary about taking it has anyone taken that much.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest david

    Posted

    You forgot to mention pure cod liver oil - perfectly safe - read great articles about vitamin D.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Dr S Dabhade

    Posted

    Perhaps the best article I have read with reference to Vitamin D and immunity and diet. It was more useful to me than any medical article I could put my hands to. It gives more solid facts without talking gibberish. Thanks.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Christie C

    Posted

    Anita I am taking 50,000 every 2 weeks for the next 5 months. I believe this is the norm when the deficiency is severe.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest hanka

    Posted

    fish oils like Tran are good source of Vitamin D if you live up north like me. I moved to Norway and I notice I tend to get ill if I 'forget' my Tran in a longer period of time. Norwegians say that you should take it all months including 'R' in their name: September to April.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    I'm so glad that I read this article as I am taking 50,000 of vitamin D a month and I have asked the doctor if he thought it was safe and he told me that it was now--I'm a little leary about taking it has anyone taken that much.

    I was recently diagnosed with several different disorders, celiac being one... but that have nothing to do with doctor prescribed 50,000 per week of vitamin D--NO dr. has ever discussed with me the connection..... hope you are doing well.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Fatima

    Posted

    I'm so glad that I read this article as I am taking 50,000 of vitamin D a month and I have asked the doctor if he thought it was safe and he told me that it was now--I'm a little leary about taking it has anyone taken that much.

    Hi Anita,

    My name is Fatima, and I live overseas in Jordan. I had an elevated PTH and vitamin D deficiency for over 10 years! and just recently my PTH level came down to normal, and my vitamin D is up to normal level by using a 50,000 powdered vitamin D once every week for 2 months, and then 5000 every other day for another month. And this is how my deficincies and PTH were corrected. Hope this help.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest flannery

    Posted

    You forgot to mention pure cod liver oil - perfectly safe - read great articles about vitamin D.

    Cod liver oil is not safe in large doses because of the Vitamin A.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I beg to differ regarding this sentence: "Vitamin D causes disease when taken in large amounts". In reality, you'd have to take a lot before that would happen (most people would not take more than 20 000iu per day). However, when taking large doses, you need to get enough magnesium, as well as some zinc, K2 and calcium - either from diet or supplements. With magnesium, you'd need supplements, though. About 400-1000mg per day, and your body will usually tell you how much you need. Get a good bio available brand.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I have read that celiac CAUSES low D. Not the other way around. Celiacs blocks D. Not sure it won't cause more pain when you take supplements. It caused more pain for me. I am still searching.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest latvianlass

    Posted

    I just read the informative book "Wheat Belly" by William Davis, MD. The author points out the relationship of celiac disease to the prevalence of wheat in the American diet, and he means all wheat, including "healthy" gluten-free bread. I think this book is a good read for anyone with nutrition and digestion problems. Will keep you posted on how I do on a (challenging!) wheat-free diet.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest chris

    Posted

    A very helpful article. I am newly diagnosed and am just now realizing why, for as long as I can remember my nails would peel like paper and I couldn't grow them except in the summer!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Thanks for this article. I sympathize with you about your immune problems. I am the same way - plagued by bladder infections and facial cellulitis. My urologist recently started me on D-Mannose. It is a sugar molecule that attracts, like a magnet, bacteria in the bladder so it passes right through and doesn't get an opportunity to burrow into the bladder wall. It might be worth a try to see if it works for you.

    I too have been diagnosed with celiac disease and consistently get facial cellulitis, for which I am always on antibiotics. What did your doctor tell you to do about this? I am just curious because I hate taking antibiotics as it consistently hurts my stomach.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest restorationgirl

    Posted

    I did an elimination diet to find out what was making me like a narcoleptic. After I started adding foods back in, the symptoms for all food groups across the board were out of control - I seemed to be allergic to everything. Your article gives me renewed hope. One of the supplements a doctor had given me after doing testing was Vit D3-5 from Bio-Tech. I had stopped taking it along with 5 other supplements for reasons I won't bore you with. I think I'll add in the vitamin D and see if that makes a difference. I'm also vitamin C deficient to the point of scurvy, but can juice with my Omega 8400 Juicer with no problem (when I'm awake!)

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    I'm so glad that I read this article as I am taking 50,000 of vitamin D a month and I have asked the doctor if he thought it was safe and he told me that it was now--I'm a little leary about taking it has anyone taken that much.

    I have been taking 50,000 milligrams of vitamin D once a week for 9 months and my level is only 17. They say it won't hurt you because you don't have enough to begin with. My Level was only 7 when I started.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Informative article. My daughter has recently been diagnosed with celiac disease at a tender age of 1.5 years. Doctor has assured that egg yolks and pure cow milk may be taken. From the article and comments followed, I cannot understand if celiac patients can digest egg or milk.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    I just read the informative book "Wheat Belly" by William Davis, MD. The author points out the relationship of celiac disease to the prevalence of wheat in the American diet, and he means all wheat, including "healthy" gluten-free bread. I think this book is a good read for anyone with nutrition and digestion problems. Will keep you posted on how I do on a (challenging!) wheat-free diet.

    Gluten-free bread is free of wheat, so this doesn't make sense. However, if you're saying gluten-free bread is not healthy, that would make sense. Gluten free breads are made with non-wheat flours (rice, nut, etc.).

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Informative article. My daughter has recently been diagnosed with celiac disease at a tender age of 1.5 years. Doctor has assured that egg yolks and pure cow milk may be taken. From the article and comments followed, I cannot understand if celiac patients can digest egg or milk.

    Generally, celiac patients have trouble digesting the protein in milk (casein), so it's recommended that dairy also be eliminated if you have celiac disease. I drink alternative milks. I also developed a slight egg allergy, apparently from the iodine in eggs, which can be a trigger (iodine) for people who get the celiac rash (dermatitis herpetiformis).

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Ads by Google:

  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   6 Members, 0 Anonymous, 404 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    This is not Medical advice: The biopsy determination of celiac disease requires demonstration of the abnormalities in the proximal small intestine. It is not possible to get such a biopsy going through the anus. The colonoscope does not reach that far. The biopsy instrument must go through the mouth. This is usually achieved with a upper endoscopy (AKA gastroscopy, EGD) A colonoscopy is frequently preformed for the investigation of diarrhea but does not and can not detect celiac disease. Joseph A. Murray, MD.

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 06/25/2003 - Below is an abstract of yet another study that supports the use of human anti-tTG type IgA serological tests to accurately diagnose celiac disease:


    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
    Volume 17 Issue 11 Page 1415 - June 2003
    Antibodies to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase may detect coeliac disease patients undiagnosed by endomysial antibodies
    N. Tesei*, E. Sugai*, H. Vázquez*, E. Smecuol*, S. Niveloni*, R. Mazure*, M. L. Moreno*, J. C. Gomez, E. Mauriño* & J. C. Bai*
    Background: The screening and diagnosis of coeliac disease have been simplified by the advent of new serological tools.
    Aim: To assess the clinical utility of a newly developed kit for antibodies to human recombinant tissue transglutaminase (hu-anti-tTG) in a large population of patients undergoing intestinal biopsy for suspected intestinal disorders.
    Methods: We evaluated 426 serum samples from consecutive adult patients (250 from untreated coeliac disease patients and 176 from individuals in whom a diagnosis of coeliac disease had been excluded), obtained at the time of intestinal biopsy. Samples were tested for immunoglobulin A (IgA) hu-anti-tTG by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, IgA endomysial antibodies (EmA) by indirect immunofluorescence and IgA and IgG antigliadin antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. A sub-group of samples was also assessed for a guinea-pig-based anti-tissue transglutaminase.
    Results: According to the cut-off for hu-anti-tTG, the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91%, 96%, 97% and 87%, respectively. Simultaneous determination of EmA showed values of 86%, 100%, 100% and 83% for the same parameters. Although 19 coeliac disease patients (7.6%) were negative for EmA and hu-anti-tTG, both tests rendered superior statistical values to antigliadin antibody tests. At diagnosis, IgA deficiency was detected in 11 patients, but both assays were able to detect samples with mild to moderate deficiency. The comparison of hu-anti-tTG with EmA showed excellent concordance between the tests ( statistic, 0.85). Discordance was observed in 20 samples from coeliac disease patients (8%) and in nine samples from controls (5%). Fifteen samples had an EmA-negative but hu-anti-tTG-positive serology, and five showed the converse pattern. Comparison of human recombinant and guinea-pig tests showed concordant results in 96% of cases.
    Conclusions: The quantitative determination of hu-anti-tTG type IgA using a commercial enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay kit was highly sensitive and specific for the detection of coeliac disease. Our results in a large population of patients with a clinical condition suggestive of the disorder demonstrated that the test can be used to detect a substantial number of patients otherwise unrecognized by IgA EmA.

    Roy Jamron
    Celiac.com 11/07/2006 – We should be hearing more about this in the news soon. A confocal laser endomicroscopy device developed by Optiscan, an Australian company, permits endoscopists to make an accurate real-time diagnosis of celiac disease, bypassing the need to take and prepare and evaluate biopsy specimens in a laboratory. This technique would allow the endoscopist to view and evaluate as many samples as needed to make a correct diagnosis and immediately give the results to the patient. This should reduce diagnostic errors. A paper on Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in the diagnosis of Celiac disease by R. Leong et al. will be presented in Adelaide, Australia this Saturday, Oct. 14. Australian Gastroenterology Week (AGW) 2006
    Hosted by the Gastroenterological Society of Australia (GESA)
    Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, South Australia
    11-14th October 2006.
    To be presented Oct. 14, 2006:
    Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy in the diagnosis of Celiac disease R Leong
    Optiscans unique and patented technology has miniaturized the microscopes scanning head, so that it is now so small it can fit inside the body. Once the miniaturized scanner is integrated into an endoscope to create an endomicroscope, doctors can for the first time safely and instantly get high quality images of tissue at a cellular level from their patients. This gives doctors new levels of information providing a highly magnified view of living tissue that is entirely consistent with the macroscopic views that they are used to seeing from their endoscopes. This breakthrough technology creates a vast array of new applications, both medical and industrial. Optiscans primary focus is in the medical arena, where it can provide a virtual biopsy, potentially revolutionizing current pathology and histology practices.
    About Optiscan
    http://www.optiscan.com.au/about/about_02.asp
    Sample Images
    http://www.optiscan.com.au/Technology/Images_01.asp

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/18/2015 - Getting high-quality biopsy specimens is key to making accurate celiac disease diagnoses. Endoscopists may take either a single- or double-biopsy specimen with each pass of the forceps.
    Does it matter whether they take one or two? Is two better than one?
    A team of researchers recently set out to answer those questions, by comparing the quality of biopsy specimens obtained with the single-biopsy and double-biopsy techniques.
    The research team includes M. Latorre, S.M. Lagana, D.E. Freedberg, S.K. Lewis, B. Lebwohl, G. Bhagat, and P. H. Green of the Celiac Disease Center, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.
    Their prospective cohort study looked at patients undergoing upper endoscopy with confirmed, suspected, or unknown celiac disease status. A total of 86 patients enrolled in the study, 47% with known celiac disease, 36% with suspected celiac disease, and 17% with an unknown celiac disease status.
    In each case, patients received four biopsy specimens from the second portion of the duodenum. Two were made using the single-biopsy technique of 1 bite per pass of the forceps, and two more using the double-biopsy technique, which takes 2 bites per pass of the forceps.
    Specimens were blindly reviewed to determine orientation, consecutive crypt-to-villous units, and Marsh score. Well-oriented biopsy specimens were noted in 66% of patients with the single-biopsy technique and 42% of patients with the double-biopsy technique (P < .01).
    Analysis of matched pairs showed improved orientation with the single-biopsy technique (odds ratio 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-7.1; P < .01). This persisted in subgroup analysis of patients with known celiac disease (P = .02), villous atrophy (P = .02), and a final diagnosis of celiac disease (P < .01).
    Now, this is just a single-center trial, so results need to be compared with results from additional cities.
    Interestingly, these results suggest that one bite is actually better than two, because the single-biopsy technique improves the yield of well-oriented duodenal biopsy specimens.
    For best results, the endoscopists should consider taking only one biopsy specimen per pass of the forceps in patients undergoing biopsies of the duodenal mucosa.
    Source:
    Gastrointest Endosc. 2015 Jan 29. pii: S0016-5107(14)02380-3. doi: 10.1016/j.gie.2014.10.024.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.