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    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Troncone R, Greco L, Mayer M, Mazzarella G, et. al.
    Gastroenterology, 1996; 111: 318-324
    The final paragraph says:
    In conclusion, our data show that approximately half of the siblings of patients with celiac disease show signs of sensitization to gluten as they mount an inflammatory local response to rectal gluten challenge. The genetic background and the clinical meaning of such gluten sensitivity need to be established. Further studies, particularly at the jejunal level, are necessary before deciding if any action is to be taken in this subset of first-degree relatives.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/04/2012 - After numerous studies over several decades showing higher mortality rates in people with celiac disease, including a comprehensive study in 2009, published in Gastroenterology, news of a recent UK study, finding mortality rates for people with untreated celiac disease that are similar to the general population, has raised a few eyebrows.
    With diverse study data fueling differing opinions, questions regarding long-term mortality in people with celiac disease will likely take time to resolve.
    In the meantime, a review of scientific literature brought up this small 2007 study. In it, a research team compared long-term mortality rates in people diagnosed with celiac disease as children with rates for those diagnosed as adults. They wanted to find out how those rates might differ and if the rates might be related to the disease and the length of gluten exposure before diagnosis.
    To find an answer, the team gathered data for 285 children and 340 adults diagnosed with celiac disease. They continued to gather data for each until the end of 2004, excepting those who failed to follow up for other reasons.
    From their data, the team calculated standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for the period starting five years after patient diagnosis. They found that adults diagnosed with celiac disease had 38% higher mortality rates (SMR 1.38, 95% CI 1.16-1.63). Children on the other hand, faced rates three-times higher (SMR 3.32, 95% CI 2.05-5.07).
    This excess mortality in children was mainly due to higher rates of death from accidents, suicide, and violence (seven deaths, SMR 3.22, 95% CI 1.29-6.63), cancer (five deaths, SMR 3.72, 95% CI 1.21-8.67), and cerebrovascular disease (two deaths, SMR 10.03, 95% CI 1.21-36.00).
    The 2007 study found that adults with celiac disease face a modest increase in mortality rates over the long-term, but that mortality rates for those diagnosed with celiac disease as children were three-times higher starting five years after diagnosis.
    The team proposed that the increased mortality in children from external causes may be due to behavioral changes associated with living with life-long celiac disease and its treatment.
    Stay tuned for further developments regarding mortality rates in people with celaic disease.
    Source:

    The American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2007;102(4):864-870.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/29/2012 - A group of researchers recently set out to study cases of positive tissue transglutaminase antibodies with negative endomysial antibodies to determine whether or not such cases amount to celiac disease.
    The team included Thomas Hornung; Pavel Gordins; Clare Parker; and Nicholas Thompson. They are variously affiliated with the departments of Gastroenterology, and Immunology at the Northern Deanery of Newcastle upon Tyne, and with the department of Gastroenterology at Freeman Hospital in Newcastle upon Tyne in the UK.
    The most sensitive and specific blood tests for diagnosing celiac disease are those that detect immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies against human tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) enzyme, and those that measure aspects of connective tissue covering individual smooth muscle fibers, endomysial antibodies (EMA).
    Because of the high sensitivity (up to 98%) and high specificity (around 96%) reported for the tTGA assay, detection of tTGA is currently the primary blood test used in screening for celiac disease.
    The tTGA test also has a high negative predictive value approaching 100%, which makes it an excellent test for excluding celiac disease in both high and low risk groups. In contrast, positive predictive value of the tTGA test is rather poor with values between 28.6% and 60.2% being reported in several studies.
    EMA, on the other hand, has extremely high specificity values close to 100% and positive predictive value values approaching 80%.[5 10] However, compared with tTGA, EMA has lower sensitivity, usually under 90%.
    This being the case, the present standard celiac disease screening strategy is to first use tTGA, and then confirm positive results using EMA. However, doing it this way, doctors often end up with a group of patients who show divergent test results.
    For their study, the researchers wanted to gauge the percentage of patients with positive tTGA and negative EMA, but who were confirmed with celiac disease upon biopsy, and to identify factors in these patients that may help to increase diagnostic accuracy in such patients.
    The research team identified 125 consecutive patients with positive tTGA and negative EMA, who subsequently underwent endoscopy with at least two biopsies from the second part of the duodenum.
    The team charted any tTGA result over 15 U/ml as positive. They excluded any patients with known celiac disease at the time of testing.
    They then reviewed patient notes to assess indications for celiac disease serological screening, including the presence of iron deficiency anaemia, and symptoms such as diarrhea or weight loss, and family history of celiac disease. They defined diarrhea as a bowel frequency of more than three times a day.
    They then assessed histological evidence of celiac disease based on subsequent duodenal biopsies, plus Marsh grading. In cases where patient histology was unclear, they relied on the clinical assessment of a consulting gastroenterologist. Unclear histology included minimal/mild increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes of not more than 30 per 100 enterocytes and without villous atrophy, plus mild villous blunting with no increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes.
    They then categorized patients as either celiac disease negative, or celiac disease positive. Patients with no histological evidence of celiac disease on duodenal biopsies or equivocal histology plus overall clinical impression of celiac disease absence were categorized as celiac disease negative. Patients with histological evidence of celiac disease on duodenal biopsies or equivocal histology plus overall clinical impression of celiac disease presence were categorized as celiac disease positive.
    To measure IgA anti-tTGA antibody the team used a commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay called Aeskulisa, manufactured by Aesku Diagnostics GmbH in Wendelsheim, Germany.
    To detect IgA anti-EMA with the standard immunofluorescent method, they used commercial slides of monkey oesophagus sections (Euroimmun, Euroimmun AG, Lübeck, Germany). They used conjugated sheep antihuman IgA as a secondary antibody, relying on a test manufactured by Instrumentation Laboratory UK Ltd., in Warrington, UK.
    Overall, the team categorized 113 patients (90.4%) as celiac disease negative. Of these, 102 patients had no histological features of celiac disease, while 11 patients had unclear histology plus an overall clinical impression of not having celiac disease.
    They categorized twelve patients (9.6%) as celiac disease positive. Of these, 10 patients had positive histology, and two patients had unclear histology plus an overall clinical impression of having celiac disease.
    Of those with positive histology, 17% were Marsh grade I, 8% were Marsh grade II, 33% were Marsh grade IIIa, 17% were Marsh grade IIIb and 25% were Marsh grade IIIc. Those with celiac disease were more likely to be older and to have a higher tTGA level. The groups showed no difference in any clinical parameter.
    Source:
    Frontline Gastroenterol. 2012;3(2):81-83.

    Jefferson Adams
    A team of researchers recently took a look at how well the hepatitis B vaccine protected people with celiac disease over time. Specifically, they evaluated what is called long-term antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiac patients vaccinated as adolescents.
    The research team included F. Zingone, F. Morisco, A. Zanetti, L. Romanò, G. Portella, P. Capone, P. Andreozzi, R. Tortora, and C.Ciacci. They are affiliated with the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine of Federico II University of Naples in Italy.
    They set out to investigate the anti-HBs antibody persistence and immune memory to hepatitis B virus in adult celiacs vaccinated as adolescents, along with the effects of a booster administration in non-protected individuals.
    They found that, eleven years after receiving the initial vaccine dose, the percentage of vaccinees with blood levels ≥ 10 mIU/ml and antibody geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were lower among celiac patients than among control subjects (68.6% vs 91.7%, p
    Patients with anti-HBs below 10 mIU/ml received a booster dose and were retested after two weeks to measure response levels.
    Post-booster anti-HBs levels were still
    The study shows that, compared with healthy control subjects, people with celiac disease have lower seroprotective levels of anti-HBs eleven years after main vaccination, in addition to having a substantially lower response rate to a booster dose of the hepatitis B vaccine.
    Do you have celiac disease? Have you had a hepatitis B vaccine? Have you had trouble getting proper immunity levels with the hepatitis B vaccine? Is this news to you? Share your comments below.
    Source:
    Vaccine. 2011 Jan 29;29(5):1005-8. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2010.11.060.

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    So i recently had a baby and 3 months postpartum I started celery juicing and after juicing my stomach would be in so much pain. So I stopped it for a while and a whole month no pain or issues. I made an apt with a GI doctor to just get my blood work checked everything came back great except the Ema it was 1:20 he said it was strange because all the other Celiac panel test were negative my Ttg and the genetic screening even. So I made an apt with another doctor for second opinion she stated that
    Potatoes are good for breakfast! Your concoction sounds pretty good. K, how about this? Peel & dice potatoes, fry them in just enough olive oil to keep them from sticking in a skillet until they begin getting crispy. Toss in diced sweet peppers or maybe chili peppers, onions to soften. I know you're not doing egg yolks b/c of iodine but you can do the whites. Pour egg white on top until the white is done. If you have a steak or some leftover steak, you can heat that on the side. YUM!
    Hi Mom, I am so sorry you're getting the run around. Yes, the links worked for me too & that poor little thing! Cyclinglady gave you excellent advice. I really can't add anything to it but everything she says is right on. Keep advocating!  Read this: https://www.sjsreview.com/8752/features/sophomore-establishes-celiac-support-group/ I found how you can contact her. GenerationGF.Houston@gluten.org Here's the web page. Scroll down to the TX groups. https://gluten.org/k
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