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    Anti-tTG Serum Level Correlates to Degree of Intestinal Damage


    Scott Adams

    Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 2003; 36(3):219-221


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    Celiac.com 03/28/2003 - A study by Antonio Tursi, M.D, et al, was recently conducted to evaluate the correlation between the degree of histologic intestinal damage in celiac patients and their level of positivity (serum value) to anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies (anti-tTG). The study looked at 119 adult celiac patients who were diagnosed consecutively (47 men and 72 women; mean age, 28 years; range, 22-51 years), and were stratified for histologic damage according to Marsh classification. The final step was to compare their Marsh histologic intestinal damage classification with their anti-tTG serum values. Here are their results:

    Marsh I lesions were present in 13 patients (10.92%), Marsh II in 24 anti-tTG (20.16%), Marsh IIIa in 27 anti-tTG (22.68%), Marsh IIIb in 31 anti-tTG (26.05%) and Marsh IIIc in 24 anti-tTG (20.16%). Anti-tTG positivity was ranging from 1 of 13 anti-tTG (7.69%) in Marsh I lesions to 23 of 24 anti-tTG (95.83%) in Marsh IIIc lesions respectively (P

    The researchers conclude that the mean serum value in celiacs with severe enteropathy (Marsh IIIb-c lesions) was higher than in those with only slight enteropathy (Marsh I-IIIa). Further, serologic test results in the absence of histologic evaluation (biopsy) may "underestimate the real prevalence of celiac disease," thus delaying a proper diagnosis and putting patients at risk for a large variety of serious health problems.

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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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