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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    ARE COMMENSAL BACTERIA WITH A TASTE FOR GLUTEN THE MISSING LINK IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF CELIAC DISEASE? BY ROY S. JAMRON


    Roy Jamron

    This article originally appeared in the Spring 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.


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    Celiac.com 05/10/2004 - Identical twins enter life from the same womb sharing the same genetic code, the same family, the same home, largely experiencing the same environment as they develop from infancy through childhood and mature into adults. When celiac disease strikes one identical twin, the odds are the other twin also has celiac disease. Twin studies lead to the conclusion that celiac disease is strongly linked to genetic factors. Yet one identical twin may develop celiac disease while the other twin may remain completely free of celiac disease for decades if not for a lifetime.

    One study looked at 20 pairs of identical twins and 27 pairs of fraternal twins where at least one twin of the pair was known to have celiac disease. In 75% of the pairs of identical twins, both twins had celiac disease. In contrast, in only 11% of the pairs of fraternal twins did both twins have celiac disease. However, in 25% of the 20 identical twin pairs studied, one twin of the pair did not have celiac disease1. In another study which followed 5 pairs of female identical twins for 11-23 years (at least one twin of the pair having celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis), it was found that two of the twins who began the study with neither celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis remained free of the disease throughout the study2. In other words, something beyond genetics, some environmental factor, seems to be responsible for the onset of celiac disease. Exactly what is it that makes one twin intolerant to gluten and not the other?

    Looking for Answers
    To find an answer, one might start by asking when do signs of an intolerance to gluten first begin to emerge? A recent study in the UK looked at a screened sample of 5,470 children aged 7 years old and found 54 who tested positive for both tTG antibodies and IgA-EMA (tissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial antibodies) indicating celiac disease is likely present. This 1% prevalence in children is comparable to the 1% prevalence of celiac disease in adults in the UK. Since the prevalence of celiac disease is not greater in adults, this suggests that the onset of celiac disease begins in early childhood, even in cases where celiac disease is not diagnosed until later in adulthood. The authors of this study concluded, “The search for the trigger resulting in the breakdown of immune tolerance to gluten therefore needs to focus on infancy and intrauterine life3.”

    Breast-Feeding
    Breast-feeding has long been thought to delay or reduce the risk of developing celiac disease in children. This effect has been attributed to a number of potentially protective milk components and antibodies passed from the mother. Studies relying on questionnaires have found that the onset of celiac disease in children is significantly delayed if gluten is introduced into the diet while the child is still being breast-fed4-7. The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF), a component of breast milk, was studied in newborn rats. Interferon-gamma and gliadin, a gluten protein, were administered to rat pups to induce gluten enteropathy. Celiac disease-like villus atrophy was found in rat pups fed an artificial milk diet without EGF but not in breast-fed pups or pups supplemented with EGF8. Recent research shows that breast milk also passes bacterial flora from mother to newborn9. Growth factors found in human milk have been shown to aid in establishing predominant species of commensal bacteria in the gut of breast-fed infants10. The makeup of microflora which colonize the gut in early infancy is dependant on many factors, including whether babies are bottle-fed or exclusively breast-fed, whether or not delivered by caesarean section, on treatment in neonatal intensive care units, hygienic conditions, and antimicrobial procedures. Initially, it is the maternal microflora that is the source of bacteria for the newborn gut. A diet of breast milk induces the development of a flora rich in Bifidobacterium in full-term infants11. The possibility that these microflora play critical symbiotic roles in the development of the intestine and its immunological functions has not yet been considered as a factor in the onset of celiac disease.

    The Beneficial Roles of Gut Bacteria
    Over 500 species of bacteria may be present in the human gut in concentrations of between 100 billion to 1 trillion microbes per gram adding up to about 95% of the total number of cells in the human body12,13. For many years it has been known that gut bacteria play an important and beneficial role in one’s health. Extraordinary new findings on how commensal microflora participate in early gut development and in the development of the immune system have been uncovered by recent research. Here is sampling of some of these discoveries:

    A study of 64 healthy formula and breast-fed infants, aged 0-6 months, examined fecal samples for intestinal colonization of Bacteriodes fragilis, Bifidobacterium-like, and Lactobacillus-like bacteria, and compared these results with counts of IgA, IgM, and IgG antibody-secreting cells in blood fluids drawn from the infants. The result was that infants colonized with B. fragilis at one month of age had significantly higher counts of IgA- and IgM-secreting cells at the age of two months than infants not colonized with B. fragilis. It was concluded that colonization timing and the type of bacteria colonizing the gut of newborns may influence the maturation of the naive immune system14.

    Bacteriodes thetaiotaomicron, a species abundant in the guts of humans and mice, has been the focus of much research, chosen because of its predominance in the microflora and ability to be genetically manipulated. Studies of this microbe introduced into the developing guts of gnotobiotic (germ-free) laboratory mice have found B. thetaiotaomicron seems to communicate with host cells in the intestine, altering and influencing gut development and function.

    One study has shown gene activity in the host is affected by B. thetaiotaomicron colonization. Using sophisticated DNA microarray devices, a comparison of gene expression of some 25,000 mouse genes was made between germ-free and B. thetaiotaomicron colonized mice. The activity of 118 genes was found to be increased or reduced by colonization. These genes are involved in several important intestinal functions, including nutrient absorption, intestinal permeability, toxin neutralization, intestinal blood vessel development, and postnatal gut maturation suggesting that these functions should be examined further in future studies15.

    An influence on fructose production in the gut by B. thetaiotaomicron was the first finding uncovered by researchers. Pre-weaned mice produce fructose sugar on the surface of cells lining the intestine providing a food source helping to establish commensal bacteria. B. thetaiotaomicron colonizing the gut of germ-free mice causes intestinal cells to continue fructose production after weaning. If B. thetaiotaomicron is not present after weaning, fructose synthesis stops. B. thetaiotaomicron actually senses when its supply of fructose is low and instructs the host to produce more fructose in response16.

    Gene activity findings led researchers to look at the development of the intricate network of intestinal blood vessels in mice raised germ-free and in mice raised colonized with B. thetaiotaomicron or normal gut flora. When the mice reached adulthood, capillary development in the intestines was examined. Capillary development in mice colonized with B. thetaiotaomicron or normal flora was normal and complex, but capillary development in the germ-free mice was immature and arrested. Further, it was, found for blood vessel development to occur, these microbes must interact with Paneth cells (epithelial cells located at the base of the “crypts” in the small intestine)17.

    The relationship of B. thetaiotaomicron with Paneth cells was further studied. It was discovered that Paneth cells produce a protein called angiogenin 4 or Ang4 and that Paneth cells are induced to express Ang4 by B. thetaiotaomicron. Ang4 and other angiogenins were found to exhibit bactericidal and fungicidal activities against certain known pathogens. It appears that B. thetaiotaomicron and other commensal microbes, which are themselves resistant to Ang4, take part in shaping the microbial ecology of the gut and innate immunity18.

    Another study found a relationship between commensal bacteria and the development of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in rabbits. GALT consists of lymphocytes and organized tissues called Peyer’s patches and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) located within the intestinal mucosa, which are involved in the induction of immunity and tolerance. During the first few months after birth, newborn animals and humans rely on antibodies passed maternally to fend off infections until the immune system can mature. After those first few months, a diversification of antibody repertoire normally takes place within the GALT. When, shortly after birth, the appendices of rabbits are tied-off and isolated to prevent colonization by microflora, GALT development within the appendices is arrested. Rabbit pups delivered sterilely, isolated and hand-reared on a sterile diet exhibited underdeveloped GALT and antibody repertoires. In further experimentation, a number of different bacteria species were introduced into surgically-rendered, germ-free appendices of rabbits. No bacteria species alone promoted GALT development. However, the combination of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacillus subtilis consistently resulted in the development of GALT and antibody repertoire. The conclusion is that specific combinations of microflora are required for GALT development19,20.

    In other research, the composition of commensal flora in rats was shown to alter intestinal permeability. Colonization with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Streptococcus viridans significantly increased colonic wall permeability while colonization with the common probiotic strain, Lactobacillus brevis, significantly reduced permeability of the colon wall. Bacteroides fragilis induced only a slight permeability reduction21.

    Gut pathogens in combination with stimulation by cytokines such as TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) can cause cells of the intestinal epithelium to respond by releasing proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-8 (IL-8). A study found that probiotic strains, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, can suppress IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelia when stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines. Hence, some probiotic strains of bacteria may be able to down-regulate inflammation in the gut22.

    Other beneficial functions of microflora include the fermentation and removal of non-digestible dietary residue and the mucus residue produced by the epithelia; the derivation of energy as short-chain fatty acids by fermentation of carbohydrates in the colon; the production of vitamins, particularly those of the B group and vitamin K; the absorption of minerals and ions including calcium, magnesium and iron; and the formation of a protective functional barrier against pathogens23,24.

    A Role for Bacteria in Celiac Disease?
    As can been seen, commensal microflora play a myriad of complex, diverse and important roles in normal health and development. Much remains to be investigated, and new roles and functions microflora play are waiting to be discovered. The possibility that commensal bacteria are involved in the pathogenesis of celiac disease cannot be overlooked. Certainly, differences in the mix of microflora could account for why one identical twin may develop celiac disease while the other does not. Could the mix of commensal bacteria in newborn infants set the stage for the development of celiac disease? Could the onset of celiac disease be triggered by an event such as illness, use of antibiotics, stress, or pregnancy which alters the mix of microflora opening the door to a pathogenic interaction with gluten? One recent study has already found an association between antibiotic use and the development of Crohn’s disease25.

    Over the course of the last few years, much new understanding of the pathogenesis of celiac disease has come to light, but a fundamental question remains unanswered: Why does the immune system fail to tolerate gluten in some people? A possible mechanism involving one or more unidentified species of commensal bacteria possibly explaining why tolerance to gluten fails will be proposed and discussed here.

    Tolerance and Immunity
    The subject of tolerance and immunity is involved and complex, and science remains far from fully comprehending its workings. At heart, is how the immune system decides to react when an antigen is first presented to a naive T cell. The response of the immune system to an antigen is mediated and regulated by cell secretions of numerous proteins called “cytokines” sensed by a multitude of receptors on the various specialized cells of the immune system. Structural components of pathogens are also sensed by immune cell receptors called “Toll-like receptors”. Antigens may be any substance foreign to the body and may or may not actually be harmful. They could be components of food, or could be components of either friendly or pathogenic organisms.

    In celiac disease, the antigens are those gluten peptides which survive the process of digestion. In the current understanding of celiac disease, these peptides are transported across the mucosal epithelium as polypeptides. In mainly the subepithelial region, gluten peptides undergo a process called deamidation by an enzyme called tissue transglutaminase (tTG). A peptide is a chain of amino acids. Deamidation is a process that converts glutamine amino acid components of a gluten peptide into glutamic acid components. In the lamina propria region of the intestines, deamidated gluten peptides are taken up by antigen presenting cells called dendritic cells and presented by HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 molecules on the surface of dendritic cells to receptors of gluten-sensitive naive CD4+ T cells (Note celiac disease here refers to a “cluster of differentiation” number, a numbering system for the cell-surface molecules which identify T cell type). Activated CD4+ T cells then differentiate and proliferate. Some T cells interact with B cells which, in turn, then differentiate into plasma cells producing antigliadin, antiendomysial and anti-tTG antibodies. Other T cells become natural killer or cytotoxic T cells, secreting cytokines which cause inflammation and damage to the enterocytes in the epithelium. Connective tissue cells called “fibroblasts” increase their output of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes which may play an active role in villus atrophy. Intraepithelial lymphocytes also increase, but their role is not clear26-29.

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes encode the class II molecules DQ2 and DQ8, the key genetic risk factors in celiac disease. The HLA system is the human version of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA class II molecules are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells. Virtually all celiac disease patients carry DQ2 or DQ8, but carrying DQ2 or DQ8 alone does not confer celiac disease. DQ2 and DQ8 molecules may be encoded by several different haplotypes. Haplotypes are combinations of alternative genes for the same trait (alleles) occupying different locations on a chromosome which tend to be inherited as a group. These DQ2 and DQ8 molecules play a central role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. The function of HLA class II molecules is to bind peptide antigens and present them to CD4+ T-cell receptors. The pattern of amino acids in the makeup of the chain that forms the peptide antigen is called an epitope, and that pattern is crucial to the binding between HLA molecule and peptide. It is the misfortune of celiac disease patients that epitopes of deamidated gluten peptides just happen to match up and firmly anchor into the binding grooves of DQ2 and DQ8 molecules. This strong binding results in the activation of CD4+ T cells and the subsequent processes which damage the intestinal epithelia. But why is it that CD4+ T cells are not activated in everyone who possesses the appropriate HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 haplotypes? The question arises again. Why is one identical twin tolerant to gluten and not the other?26-30

    Dendritic Cells
    Whether an outcome of tolerance or intolerance results when a dendritic cell presents an antigen to a naive T cell depends on many factors. A dendritic cell is a special type of white blood cell (leukocyte) which circulates throughout the body looking to acquire antigens. Dendritic cells engulf and internalize antigens through a process called endocytosis. In receptor-mediated endocytosis, dendritic cells express a variety of surface receptors to capture protein antigens. In macropinocytosis, dendritic cells surround and “drink up” soluble antigens. In phagocytosis, dendritic cells engulf pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, dead or infected cells, or their products. After digestion and processing, the antigens are bound to HLA (or MHC) molecules and expressed on the surface of dendritic cells for presentation to T cells. Antigen presentation occurs after dendritic cells migrate to the lymph nodes which are rich with T cells. T cell activation also requires secondary stimulation by costimulatory molecules expressed on the dendritic cell surface. Dendritic cells have three stages in their life cycle: Precursor, immature and mature. Precursor dendritic cells arise from the bone marrow. Subsets of precursor dendritic cells have been identified that grow and differ with regard to observable characteristics (phenotype), function and anatomical location. Studies have linked dendritic cell subsets with particular functions such as T cell differentiation or tolerance induction. Immature dendritic cells spread throughout tissues seeking antigens. Dendritic cells enter the mature stage when they reach the lymph nodes after antigen capture and having become primed and ready to activate T cells with antigens and costimulatory molecules. The processing of antigens produces roughly 100,000 to 300,000 peptide-laden HLA molecules on the dendritic cell surface, most peptides represented by about 100 copies. A single mature dendritic cell is capable of stimulating 100–3,000 T cells31-34.

    Immature dendritic cells are capable of phagocytosis of bacteria. Dendritic cell phagocytosis of Salmonella and Borrelia burgdorferi has been observed and studied. Immature dendritic cells roaming the lamina propria below the epithelial cells of the intestine not only capture bacteria which invade and cross the epithelial barrier, but have been observed reaching through the tight junctions between epithelial cells with their dendrite arms to directly sample non-invasive bacteria in the gut lumen and mucosa tissues outside the epithelium34-37.

    Immature dendritic cells express a variety of surface receptors which when stimulated cause dendritic cells to mature and respond in specific ways which can result in tolerance or immune activity. These receptors include Toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokine receptors, TNF (tumor necrosis factor) receptor, immunoglobulin (antibody) receptors, and sensors for cell death. TNF and other cykotine inflammatory mediators signal infections. In particular, interleukin-1 (IL-1) can prevent oral tolerance in mice by altering the response of normally tolerogenic dendritic cells into an active immune response32,34.

    Toll-like receptors are known as pattern recognition receptors which identify structural components found only on the surface of bacteria and other pathogens. These components are referred to as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). At least 10 types of TLR have been identified in humans and given the designations, TLR1-TLR10. Examples of PAMP include microbial carbohydrates like the toxin lipopolysaccharides (LPS), flagellin, products from bacterial cell walls, bacterial RNA and DNA. Signaling through different TLR evokes distinct biological responses. TLR expressed differently by different dendritic cell subsets may determine the manner in which dendritic cell subsets respond to particular microbial structures34,39.

    Mature dendritic cells can produce cytokines while activating CD4+ T cells which may influence T cell differentiation and function. Activated T cells divide and proliferate and differentiate into a variety of types. Tolerance and immunity induction are influenced most by differentiation into type 1 and type 2 helper T cells (Th1 and Th2) and regulatory T cells. The type of cytokines produced by the T cells determine their classification. Th2 responses favor tolerance. Th1 responses favor immunity and inflammation. Regulatory T cells suppress immune responses. IL-10 produced by dendritic cells appears to contribute to Th2 and regulatory T cell responses. Dendritic cell production of IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23 contribute to a Th1 response34,40.

    Why Does Tolerance to Gluten Fail?
    Okay. So why does the immune system fail to tolerate gluten in celiac disease? The immune system receives and responds to all kinds of signals from a pathogen, but how can a simple gluten peptide turn this complex immune machinery into a force against itself? Thinking about this leads to a very provocative question:

    What if instead of responding to gluten peptides alone, the immune system responds to a pathogenic gut bacteria which routinely ingests gluten peptides?

    A 33 amino acid gluten peptide has been identified as the primary initiator of the inflammatory response in celiac disease. This peptide contains a number of amino acid sequences which correspond to epitopes known to activate T cells and initiate celiac disease response. In particular, this 33-mer peptide was identified because it remained intact in the residue of a solution of gliadin mixed with gastric and pancreatic enzymes. This demonstrates some gluten peptides are difficult to breakdown by normal digestive processes. Another experiment identified a 17 amino acid gluten peptide which also contained epitopes associated with celiac disease41,42.

    Bacteria do not ingest nutrients in the normal sense. Nutrients are transported across cell membranes via several different mechanisms. Transported nutrients are necessarily limited in size. Nutrients are broken down externally by enzymes and by processes such as fermentation, an oxidation process resulting from acids produced by bacteria. Growth factors consisting of purines, pyrimidines, vitamins and amino acids are required by some bacteria in order to grow. Other bacteria are able to synthesize these essential growth factors. Researchers have found that some bacteria can transport and internalize amino acids in the form of peptides. Studies so far have found peptides up to 18 amino acids in length can be internalized by bacteria43-46.

    Epitopes of gluten peptides deamidated by tissue transglutaminase (tTG) are believed central to celiac disease pathogenesis. However, a study of gluten response in children with celiac disease found that T cells can respond to native gluten peptides independent of deamidation47. Celiac disease may begin its course without deamidation. As the disease progresses, inflammation may cause an increase in expression of tTG. An increase in tTG expression has been shown during wound healing, in liver injury, and in response to an inflammatory stimulus by lipopolysaccharide48-50. Through a process called epitope spreading and with the increase in tTG expression, deamidation of gluten peptides is more likely to occur and T cell response to deamidated gluten peptides likely develops. tTG is expressed in the epithelial brush border and extracellularly in the subepithelial region26 (The brush border is composed of the microvilli found on each individual epithelial cell).

    In the course of evolution of bacteria in the gut, it would seem highly plausible that at least one or more bacteria species have evolved and adapted in some way to transport, internalize and utilize gluten peptides as a source of amino acids. Since tTG is expressed in the epithelial brush border, deamidated gluten peptides are available to such bacteria (though in the early stage of celiac disease deamidation may not be required). If these bacteria colonize the gut and exhibit some pathogenic characteristic, such as expressing lipopolysaccharide, dendritic cells may be signaled to reach through the epithelial barrier into the lumen to sample and phagocytize the bacteria. When this bacteria is digested and processed by the dendritic cells, the antigens bound to HLA molecules and expressed on the dendritic cell surface are likely to include the difficult to breakdown, intact gluten peptides that have been internalized by the bacteria. As far as the immune system is concerned, these gluten peptides are indistinguishable from the other bacterial peptides bound to HLA molecules expressed on the dendritic cell surface. When these gluten peptide antigens are bound to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 molecules and presented to CD4+ T cells, the T cells simultaneously receive all the signals telling them that the gluten peptide is an antigen from a pathogenic bacteria. The result is that the immune system responds to the presence of gluten as though pathogenic bacteria were present. Such gluten-ingesting bacteria may be the missing link in the pathogenesis of Celiac Disease.

    If these bacteria exist, there is now a clear explanation as to why one identical twin may develop celiac disease and not the other. Of course, the presence of such a bacteria in the gut of one twin and not the other would fully explain the discordance. It is also possible that such a bacteria may exist in both twins, but is kept under control by the mix of commensal bacteria colonizing the gut of one twin. Some disturbance to this mix, such as an infection or use of antibiotics, might provide an opportunity for this gluten-ingesting bacteria to colonize and proliferate to a level where its pathogenic properties, such as production of endotoxins, are sensed by the immune system initiating the onset of celiac disease. The existence of such bacteria could also explain why there may be varying degrees of gluten sensitivity, even in individuals without DQ2 and DQ8 molecules.

    The possibility that these gluten-ingesting bacteria may exist raises another intriguing question: If these gluten-ingesting bacteria are controlled or eliminated from the gut, could tolerance to gluten be restored? There could be a very real possibility that celiac disease might be cured by eliminating these bacteria. After all, peptic ulcers can be cured by eliminating Helicobacter pylori.

    The Future
    So where should research go from here? The most obvious path would be first to try to find and identify any gut bacteria that has gluten peptides present within its cell membranes. From there, the possible link to celiac disease could be studied. Additionally, it would be quite valuable to initiate a large long-term study of the makeup of commensal bacteria in identical twins beginning at birth via fecal samples. By comparing the differences in microflora and the onset and discordance of diseases in identical twins over many years, the relationships of specific species of bacteria to specific diseases, including celiac disease, could be established. And if it proves to be true that gluten-ingesting bacteria cause celiac disease, a similar mechanism involving bacteria and peptides from other proteins may be the root cause for many other autoimmune diseases. A whole class of autoimmune diseases might be cured by eliminating specific species of bacteria.

    Roy Jamron holds degrees in physics and engineering from the University of Michigan and the University of California at Davis and actively pursues and investigates research on celiac disease and related disorders.

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    • Anderson RP, Degano P, Godkin AJ, Jewell DP, Hill AV. In vivo antigen challenge in celiac disease identifies a single transglutaminase-modified peptide as the dominant A-gliadin T-cell epitope. Nat Med 2000 Mar;6(3):337-42.
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    From my current pathology book given to me in Massage School, I learned also that the glutenin is blocking my digestion so that the T-cells go in to destroy it. So yes it doesn't break down at all. Interestingly enough, I was not breast-fed as a child like the article inquired and I was around a lot of toxins at home (chemicals/cleaner/yard and garden pesticides) also there was a booster shot of some sort I received when I was younger that completely numbed my leg and cause me great nausea and confusion. Not sure about the shot but the other two are important. Also to note my grandfather more than likely had celiac disease, his swollen stomach started at his chest/collar bones and went all the way down. I never saw his ribs until he was on his death bed doing chemotherapy. My mother has many of the similar symptoms but like the book said not all celiac people experience pain or all symptoms.

    I on the other hand have experienced at most 99% including the final fatal blow Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma cancer, which is eradicated thank the Lord. My diet is definitely changed. Also, thank you for not charging to use your site, another sites required me to pay and I was not interested in paying for information that I could learn from books and experience. I just need to know tips and hints.

    Thank you for all your hard work and studying, I appreciate your persistence.

    Gwhite

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    Your thinking seems sound. Good luck with getting funding for your proposed line of research, and keep us all posted!

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    Guest JenCO

    Posted

    Excellent article.

    You may be interested in this:

    Mark Davis's call for an Immunological equivalent of the Human Genome Project as reported on the Life Extension website. Personally, I believe the usefulness of this study will actually be far greater than the Human Genome Project.

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    Celiac.com 02/09/2006 - Do not try this at home. If you have celiac disease you need to remain on a gluten-free diet. This particular study, as indicated below, involved only one person--which is far too small of a sample to draw any solid conclusions from. It does, however, offer some hope that there may be other unknown factors that cause this disease--perhaps factors that can be reversed or kept in check. Many more studies will be needed to determine this. After reading and publishing much of Roy Jamrons work, we thought his comments on this study were very interesting and have reproduced them here.
    Comments by Roy Jamron:
    This is interesting, a case of reintroducing gluten to a celiac woman after a 10 year gluten-free diet with no symptoms of celiac disease showing up during a 15 month follow up study. It would be interesting if she remains symptom free in subsequent years.
    It does bring up the idea of a gluten-ingesting bacteria link which I proposed in my article, Are Commensal Bacteria with a Taste for Gluten the Missing Link in the Pathogenesis of Celiac Disease?. In that article I proposed that a bacteria capable of transporting and internalizing gluten peptides resistant to breakdown could initiate a T cell immune response to gluten. Antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells) might present gluten peptides internalized by the bacteria along with peptides and chemical signals from the bacteria to T cells. The T cells would not be able to distinguish the gluten peptides from the bacteria peptides and would, therefore, initiate an immune response to gluten peptides as though they were components from pathogenic bacteria. The presence or non-presence of such a bacteria in twins offered an explanation as to why one identical twin could develop celiac disease and not the other.
    After 10 years on a gluten-free diet, it is possible that the numbers of such gluten-ingesting bacteria might diminish to a level too few to initiate a gluten immune response, especially if the bacteria largely depend on gluten for nutrition. So, like the twin who does not develop celiac disease, she remains symptom free.
    I urged researchers to look for such gluten-ingesting bacteria in my article, and I continue to urge such research. Such bacteria could be found through the use of immunogold electron microscopy. This technique permits gluten peptides to be bound to and labeled with gold particles which show up as distinct opaque spots under the electron microscope. Such spots found within microscopic cross sections of fecal bacteria samples would identify gluten-ingesting bacteria.
    Abstract of Study:


    An Attempt of Specific Desensitizing Treatment with Gliadin in Celiac Disease
    Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2005 Oct-Dec;18(4):709-14.
    Gluten-free diet is the current treatment of celiac disease. We decided to verify the occurrence of histological and serological modification and/or clinical manifestations during a gradual and progressive introduction of gliadin in the diet and if it may induce a tolerance to food, as it occurs in allergic patients. We studied the case of a celiac woman with complete clinical and histological remittance after 10 years of gluten free diet. She took increasing daily doses of gliadin, reaching the final dose of 9 g of gliadin (15 g of gluten) in 6 months. Then she started a free dietary regimen. During the 15-month follow-up period esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy showed normal Kerckring folds and villi. Anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium and anti-tissue-transglutaminase antibodies, as well as the haematological and biochemical parameters remained normal. Our results represent a new approach in research concerning celiac disease, and could provide a future line of study for its management.

    Roy Jamron

    Celiac.com 04/10/2006 - This study looks at innate immune response to gliadin. The innate immune system responds to gliadin inducing zonulin release and increasing intestinal permeability and may be a factor in the onset of celiac disease, but I question if this leads ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with celiac disease. This innate response fails to explain why one identical twin may have celiac disease and not the other. Both of the twins as well as people not even susceptible to celiac disease would presumably have this same innate response to gliadin. I again urge celiac disease researchers to consider gluten-internalizing bacteria as the necessary trigger for the onset of celiac disease. The presence or absence of such bacteria does indeed offer an explanation as to why one twin gets celiac disease and not the other. Zonulin does not. In the commercial supplement product, Glisodin, the properties of gliadin have, in fact, already been used for the last few years to facilitate the delivery of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) protecting it from digestive acids and getting it through the intestinal mucosa, probably taking advantage of the zonulin effect. Aware of celiac disease, the developer of Glisodin tried to use other peptides as a carrier of SOD, but the only gliadin was effective. Unfortunately, this denies celiacs the benefit of using Glisodin to treat oxidative stress.
    Abstract of Study:


    J Immunol. 2006 Feb 15;176(4):2512-21.
    Gliadin Stimulation of Murine Macrophage Inflammatory Gene Expression and Intestinal Permeability Are MyD88-Dependent: Role of the Innate Immune Response in Celiac Disease.
    Thomas KE, Sapone A, Fasano A, Vogel SN. Department of Microbiology and Immunology.
    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of TLR signaling in intestinal homeostasis. Celiac disease (celiac disease) is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered in susceptible individuals by the ingestion of gliadin-containing grains. In this study, we sought to test the hypothesis that gliadin initiates this response by stimulating the innate immune response to increase intestinal permeability and by up-regulating macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine production. To this end, intestinal permeability and the release of zonulin (an endogenous mediator of gut permeability) in vitro, as well as proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine release by primary murine macrophage cultures, were measured.
    Gliadin and its peptide derivatives, 33-mer and p31-43, were found to be potent inducers of both a zonulin-dependent increase in intestinal permeability and macrophage proinflammatory gene expression and cytokine secretion. Gliadin-induced zonulin release, increased intestinal permeability, and cytokine production were dependent on myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), a key adapter molecule in the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathways, but were neither TLR2- nor TLR4-dependent. Our data support the following model for the innate immune response to gliadin in the initiation of celiac disease. Gliadin interaction with the intestinal epithelium increases intestinal permeability through the MyD88-dependent release of zonulin that, in turn, enables paracellular translocation of gliadin and its subsequent interaction with macrophages within the intestinal submucosa. There, the interaction of gliadin with macrophages elicits a MyD88-dependent proinflammatory cytokine milieu that facilitates the interaction of T cells with APCs, leading ultimately to the Ag-specific adaptive immune response seen in patients with celiac disease.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/19/2010 - Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by an adverse immune response to dietary gluten proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. One of the first ways the body responds to offending proteins in an adverse celiac disease response is by producing mucous via IgA secretion in an effort to neutralize offending antigens and pathogens.
    A team of researchers recently sought to better document the relationships between immunoglobulin-coated bacteria and bacterial composition in feces of celiac disease patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD) and healthy controls. The research team included Giada De Palma, Inmaculada Nadal, Marcela Medina, Ester Donat, Carmen Ribes-Koninckx, Miguel Calabuig,  and Yolanda Sanz.
    They observed that intestinal dysbiosis and reduced immunoglobulin-coated bacteria are associated with celiac disease in children. Both untreated and treated celiac disease patients showed markedly lower levels of IgA, IgG and IgM-coated fecal bacteria compared to healthy controls.
    Celiac disease patients showed substantially reduced ratio of Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria compared to control subjects. Untreated celiac disease patients showed less abundant group proportions (P<0.050) of Bifidobacterium, Clostridium histolyticum, C. lituseburense and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii than did healthy controls.
    Untreated celiac disease patients showed more abundant group proportions (P<0.050) of Bacteroides-Prevotella than in control subjects. Both untreated and treated celiac disease patients showed significantly impoverished (P<0.050) levels of IgA coating the Bacteroides-Prevotella compared with healthy controls.

    From these results, the research team concluded that intestinal dysbiosis plays a role in reduced IgA-coating bacteria in celiac disease patients. This offers a fresh perspective into the possible relationships between the gut microbiota and the host defenses in celiac disease patients.
    Source:

    BMC Microbiology 2010, 24 February

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 04/19/2010 - Celiac disease is a vastly growing epidemic. 1 in 133 people have celiac disease, and only about 3% of those people are accurately diagnosed with celiac. Celiac can be a silent killer if left undiagnosed, and can present itself in the guise of irritable bowel syndrome, anemia, and  colon cancer to name a few. That's why it is of utmost importance to diagnose celiac disease early on. Current studies are being conducted to determine when and why the onset of celiac occurs. In recent years epidemiological studies are indicating that the timing of the introduction of gluten, combined with breastfeeding patterns, may play an important role in the onset and development of celiac disease.
    It is very difficult to determine the true prevalence of celiac disease, due to the fact that celiac symptoms can be entirely asymptomatic, or painfully symptomatic, and the reasons for the variations in symptoms are still unknown. Individuals who test positive for the DQ2/8 antibody are genetically predisposed for celiac. However, when exposed to gluten, only about 4% of those predisposed individuals  develop celiac. This finding has led researchers to recognize the importance of other genetic factors that must also be playing a role in the development of  celiac disease.
    In recent years, remarkable scientific advances have been made concerning celiac disease. Seven additional candidate genes have recently been discovered to be possible contributors to celiac disease developments. Additionally, new findings suggest that early introduction of solid foods may also lead to development of gluten intolerance. In England, the incidence of celiac disease showed considerable decline in the 1970's following doctor recommendations to avoid adding cereals to formula diets, and to avoid the introduction of gluten to children before 4 months of age.
    A new  ten-year study which evaluated the age at first introduction of gluten containing foods, highlighted stronger epidemiological evidence regarding the timing of introduction of gluten than previously documented.  The study assessed 1,560 children between the ages of 3 and 7 months who were at risk for  celiac disease or type 1 diabetes. The results of the study showed that out of 51 children who developed celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA), those who were exposed to gluten in the first 3 months of their lives had a 5-fold increased risk of CDA than those children who were exposed to gluten at 4 to 6 months of age. Moreover, children who ingested gluten for the first time at 7 months of age or after, showed an increased hazard ratio compared to children who were introduced to gluten at 4 to 6 months of age. The results of this study indicate a connection to gluten introduction and age introduced, thereby confirming the existence of a “window period” for gluten introduction.
    Celiac disease became a rising epidemic in Sweden in the mid 1980's. The influx of celiac patients under 2 years old was cause for concern, considering neighboring countries were seeing a decline in celiac patients during that same time period. The Swedish celiac epidemic pattern was eventually correlated to the  new dietary guidelines, which as a result of the study, were later changed. The initial dietary guidelines mandated that infants were to  be introduced to gluten only after they were weaned from breastfeeding, and larger amounts of gluten were given to the infants during this time. Further findings of the study showed that while the amount of gluten  introduced during weaning of the children may play a critical role in the development and onset of CDA in genetically predisposed children, although it did not protect the children from asymptomatic celiac disease. This and other consequent studies strongly support the theory that the amount of gluten ingested during the introduction of gluten in the diet, also plays an important role in the onset of celiac disease.
    The direct correlation between celiac disease and breastfeeding is a hot topic. While many people have varying opinions of whether or not breastfeeding can contribute to the onset of celiac,  new studies demonstrate some very important findings. In England, meta-analysis findings show strong evidence that  children who were still breastfeeding during the time when gluten was introduced to their diet, had a 52% reduction risk of developing celiac disease. These findings conclude that breastfeeding during the time when gluten is introduced into the diet, can prevent many, if not most cases of symptomatic celiac disease. Additionally, Swedish observations showed that  children that were breastfed at the first exposure to gluten, exhibited a lower risk of developing celiac disease than children that were formula fed. The amount of gluten introduced into the diet did not make a difference in these cases. Even if the amount of gluten was high, the risk of developing celiac disease was reduced. Furthermore, the risk was reduced even more if the child continued to breastfeed after gluten introduction. At Chicago University, students did a study that showed that children breastfed at the time gluten was introduced into their diet, were as likely to develop intestinal as extra-intestinal symptoms, and children who were not breastfeeding when gluten was introduced showed a higher chance of showing intestinal symptoms.
    These studies confirm the possibility of a “window” period for gluten introduction. This new evidence suggests that there is actually a “window” of time for gluten to be introduced into the diet, where there is a reduced risk of the subsequent development of celiac disease.  As a result of these findings, the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) committee recommend avoidance of early and late introduction of gluten. The recommended age is older than 4 months of age, but younger than 7 months.  It is also recommended to introduce gluten gradually, in small amounts and while your child is still nursing.
    Source:

    World J Gastroenterol 2010 April 28; 16(16): 1939-1942

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    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
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    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
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    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
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    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
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    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
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    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764