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    Bifidobacterium infantis NLS Super Strain Reduces the Expression of a-Defensin-5 IN Celiac Disease Patients


    Jefferson Adams
    • Bifidobacterium infantis NLS Super Strain Reduces the Expression of a-Defensin-5, a Marker of Innate Immunity, in the Mucosa of Active Celiac Disease Patients.

    Bifidobacterium infantis NLS Super Strain Reduces the Expression of a-Defensin-5 IN Celiac Disease Patients
    Image Caption: Image: CC--United Soybean Board

    Celiac.com 07/12/2018 - Previous research has shown that the oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS) reduces of gastro-intestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients. The reduction of symptoms was not connected with changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. Therefore, researchers suspected that the reduction of symptoms might be related to the modulation of innate immunity.

    To test that hypothesis, a team of researchers set out to assess the potential mechanisms of a probiotic B.infantis Natren Life Start super strain on the mucosal expression of innate immune markers in adult patients with active untreated celiac disease compared with those treated with B. infantis 6 weeks and after 1 year of gluten-free diet.

    The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano,RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno,MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Mauriño, MD, Elena F. Verdú, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD. They are affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; the Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine and the Department of Alimentation at Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo, Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    The team determined the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, along with the expression of a-defensin-5 expression via immunohistochemistry in duodenal biopsies.

    Their results showed that a gluten-free diet lowers duodenal macrophage counts in celiac disease patients more effectively than B. infantis, while B. infantis lowers Paneth cell counts and reduces expression of a-defensin-5.

    This study documents the differential innate immune effects of treatment with B. infantis compared with 1 year of gluten-free diet. The team calls for further study to better understand the synergistic effects of gluten-free diet and B. infantis supplementation in celiac disease.

    Source:

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/09/2009 - A team of researchers based in Finland recently demonstrated for the first time that B. lactis probiotic bacteria are capable of shielding epithelial cells from cellular damage caused by gliadin exposure.
    The research team was made up of doctors K. Lindfors, T. Blomqvist, K. Juuti-Uusitalo, S. Stenman, J. Venäläinen, M. Mäki and K. Kaukinen. They are associated with the Paediatric Research Centre for the Medical School of the Finland’s University of Tampere, the Department of Peadiatrics, and the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, and the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the Finland’s University of Kuopio.    
    In people with celiac disease, wheat gliadin causes serious intestinal symptoms and damages the small-bowel mucosa. Untreated, this can leave the individual at risk of developing various cancers and numerous associated conditions. Most all of this can be reversed or prevented if detected and treated early enough.
    Currently, the only effective treatment for celiac disease is a strict life-long gluten-free diet. However, a 100% gluten-free diet is nearly impossible to maintain, with so many gluten-free products containing trace amounts of gluten. Because of this, people with celiac disease face regular gluten contamination. Also because of this, acceptable alternatives are desirable.  
    Earlier studies have indicated that probiotic bacteria might be used in sourdough fermentation to induce the hydrolysis of celiac toxic gluten in food manufacturing, and thereby benefit people with celiac disease.
    Although several studies have addressed the ability of probiotic bacteria to detoxify gliadin after an extensive incubation period, the team found none that investigated whether various live probiotic bacteria can inhibit gliadin-induced toxic effects directly on epithelial cells.
    In this study the team set out to determine whether probiotics Lactobacillus fermentum or Bifidobacterium lactis might block the toxic effects of gliadin in intestinal cell culture conditions.
    To assess the degree to which live probiotics were able to block peptic-tryptic digested gliadin-induced degradation of human colon cells Caco-2, the team measured epithelial permeability by transepithelial resistance, actin cytoskeleton arrangements by the extent of membrane ruffling and expression of tight junctional protein ZO-1.
    B. lactis inhibited the gliadin-induced increase dose-dependently in epithelial permeability, and, at higher concentrations totally eliminated the gliadin-induced reduction in transepithelial resistance.
    That is, B. lactis decreased or eliminated the compromise in cell-wall resistance caused by gliadin. This means that B. lactis overcame the mechanism that gives rise to the decreased cell resistance and the increased permeability that occurs during an adverse reaction to wheat gliadin.
    The B. lactis strain also interfered with the creation of membrane ruffles in Caco-2 cells caused by gliadin exposure. Furthermore, it also shielded the tight junctions of Caco-2 cells from the toxic effects of gliadin, as shown by the way in which ZO-1 is expressed.
    The researchers concluded that live B. lactis bacteria might achieve partial to full blockage of gliadin toxicity gluten/gliadin-induced damage in the small-intestinal mucosa of people with celiac disease, and that it merits further study concerning its potential as a dietary supplement to guard against any silent damage associated with accidental gluten-contamination in celiac disease.
    Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 152: 552–558


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/11/2009 - Although doctors view celiac disease mainly as a gastrointestinal disease, it is now known to have widespread systemic manifestations.
    A team of researchers recently set out to define the nature and role of systemic cytokine levels in the pathophysiology of celiac disease.  The research team was made up of John Sanil Manavalan, Lincoln Hernandez, Jayesh Girish Shah, John Konikkara, Afzal Jamal Naiyer, Anne Roland Lee, Edward Ciaccio, Maria Theresa Minaya, Peter H.R. Green, and Govind Bhagat of the Departments of Medicine and Pathology at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons.
    The team conducted multiplex cytokine assays on four different groups of adult patients: patients with active celiac disease; patients on a gluten-free diet with positive TTG IgA antibodies, patients on a gluten-free diet with negative antibodies; and those with refractory celiac disease.
    They then compared the results against the values in healthy adult controls.
    Patients with active celiac disease and those on gluten-free diet with positive antibodies showed substantially higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-, interleukin (IL)–1, tumor necrosis factor–, IL-6 and IL-8, and also Th-2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-10, compared with normal controls and patients on a gluten-free diet without antibodies.
    One interesting finding was that patients following a gluten-free diet for under 1 year showed substantially higher levels of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and Th2 cytokines compared with the patients on gluten-free diet for more than 1 year.
    Moreover, the team noted a statistically significant association between levels of TTG IgA titers and serum levels of Th-2 cytokines IL-4 (p 0.001), IL-10 (p  0.001) and inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 (p  0.001), IL-1 (p 0.005), and IL-8 (p  0.05).
    Journal of Human Immunology, 2009.
    j.humimm.2009.09.351


    Jefferson Adams
    Can Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start Strain Help Active Celiac Disease?
    Celiac.com 03/13/2013 - To determine if the probiotic Bifidobacterium natren life start (NLS) strain might affect the treatment and clinical features of patients with untreated celiac disease, a team of researchers recently conducted an exploratory, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of Bifidobacterium infantis natren life start super strain in active celiac disease.
    The research team included E. Smecuol, H.J. Hwang, E. Sugai, L. Corso, A.C. Cherñavsky, F.P. Bellavite, A. González, F. Vodánovich, M.L. Moreno, H. Vázquez, G. Lozano, S.Niveloni, R. Mazure, J. Meddings, E. Mauriño, and J.C. Bai. They are variously affiliated with the Small Intestinal Section of the Department of Medicine in the Department of Alimentation at the Hospital de Gastroenterología "Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo," the Department of Immunogenetics of the Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín" at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, the Consejo de Investigación en Salud, Ministerio de Salud in Ciudad de Buenos Aires, the Department of Gastroenterology at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and the Gastrointestinal Research Group at the University of Calgary in Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    For their study, the team enrolled 22 adult patients with two positive celiac disease-specific tests.
    Over a three week period, patients randomly received two capsules of either Bifidobacterium infantis natren life start strain super strain (Lifestart 2) (2×10 colony-forming units per capsule). All patients consumed at least 12 g of gluten per day for the duration of the test. In all, twelve patients received the bifidobacterium, while ten received the placebo.
    At the end of the trial, the team used biopsy to confirm celiac disease in all patients. The primary factor being measured was changes to intestinal permeability. The secondary factor was changes in symptoms and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, and in immunologic indicators of inflammation.
    Neither treatment caused significant changes in abnormal baseline intestinal permeability.
    In contrast to patients receiving the placebo, patients who received B. infantis experienced significant improvements as measured by the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (P=0.0035 for indigestion; P=0.0483 for constipation; P=0.0586 for reflux).
    The administration of B. infantis was completely safe. Patients who received B. infantis showed lower ratios of IgA tTG and IgA DGP antibody (P=0.055 for IgA tTG and P=0.181 for IgA DGP).
    Patients who received B. infantis also had significantly higher levels of serum macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (P<0.04).
    The results indicate that B. infantis may alleviate symptoms in untreated celiac disease. The probiotic produced some immunologic changes, but did not change abnormal intestinal permeability.
    The researchers call for further study to confirm and/or expand these results.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2013 Feb;47(2):139-47. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0b013e31827759ac.

    Jefferson Adams
    Bifidobacterium infantis NLS Super Strain Reduces a-Defensin-5 in Active Celiac Disease Patients
    Celiac.com 12/29/2016 - Researchers have documented a reduction of gastrointestinal symptoms in untreated celiac disease patients after oral administration of Bifidobacterium infantis Natren Life Start super strain (NLS-SS). The reduction of symptoms was not connected with and changes in intestinal permeability or serum levels of cytokines, chemokines, or growth factors. That led the team to hypothesize that the benefits observed in celiac patients treated with B. infantis may be connected to the modulation of innate immunity.
    A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the potential mechanisms of a probiotic B. infantis Natren Life Start super strain on the mucosal expression of innate immune markers in adult patients with active untreated celiac disease compared with those treated with B. infantis 6 weeks and after 1 year of gluten-free diet. The research team included Maria I. Pinto-Sanchez, MD, Edgardo C. Smecuol, MD, Maria P. Temprano, RD, Emilia Sugai, BSBC, Andrea Gonzalez, RD, PhD, Maria L. Moreno, MD, Xianxi Huang, MD, PhD, Premysl Bercik, MD, Ana Cabanne, MD, Horacio Vazquez, MD, Sonia Niveloni, MD, Roberto Mazure, MD, Eduardo Maurino, MD, Elena F. Verdu´, MD, PhD, and Julio C. Bai, MD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Medicine Department, Farcombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; Small Intestinal Section, Department of Medicine; Department of Alimentation, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital and Research Institute at the Universidad del Salvador in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    They first used immunohistochemistry to assess the numbers of macrophages and Paneth cells, and the expression a-defensin-5 in duodenal biopsies. They found that a gluten-free diet reduces duodenal macrophage counts in celiac patients more effectively than B. infantis. In contrast, B. infantis decreases Paneth cell counts and expression of a-defensin-5 in celiac disease (P< 0.001).
    The results identify differential innate immune effects of treatment with B. infantis compared with 1 year of gluten-free diet.
    The team is calling for further study to determine synergistic effects of gluten-free diet and B. infantis supplements in celiac disease.
    Source:
    salvador.academia.edu

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