Jump to content

Important Information

This site places cookies on your device (Cookie settings). Continued use is acceptance of our Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Member Statistics

    84,943
    Total Members
    4,125
    Most Online
    Holspen
    Newest Member
    Holspen
    Joined
  • 0

    Can Targeting Gut Bacteria Prevent Autoimmune Disease?


    Jefferson Adams
    • Researchers suggest that targeting a specific gut bacterium could help to prevent autoimmune disease. They found that E. gallinarum triggered an autoimmune response in mice when it traveled beyond the gut.

    Can Targeting Gut Bacteria Prevent Autoimmune Disease?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--John Voo

    Celiac.com 04/25/2018 - A team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. The research could be helpful for treating type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease.

    In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells and tissues. Autoimmune disease affects nearly 24 million people in the United States. 

    In their study, a team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. They found that E. gallinarum triggered an autoimmune response in the mice when it traveled beyond the gut.

    They also found that the response can be countered by using antibiotics or vaccines to suppress the autoimmune reaction and prevent the bacterium from growing. The researchers were able to duplicate this mechanism using cultured human liver cells, and they also found the bacteria E. gallinarum in the livers of people with autoimmune disease.

    The team found that administering an antibiotic or vaccine to target E. gallinarum suppressed the autoimmune reaction in the mice and prevented the bacterium from growing. "When we blocked the pathway leading to inflammation," says senior study author Martin Kriegel, "we could reverse the effect of this bug on autoimmunity."

    Team research team plans to further investigate the biological mechanisms that are associated with E. gallinarum, along with the potential implications for systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease.

    This study indicates that gut bacteria may be the key to treating chronic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease. Numerous autoimmune conditions have been linked to gut bacteria.

    Read the full study in Science.


    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Roy Jamron
    Celiac.com 11/06/2008 - Previously, the possible link between gut bacteria and celiac disease has been discussed in "Do Vitamin D Deficiency, Gut Bacteria, and Gluten Combine in Infancy to Cause Celiac Disease?"[1] A 5-year European study, DIABIMMUNE, is currently underway focusing on some 7000 children, from birth, investigating the development of intestinal bacterial flora and its influence on the development of the human immune system and autoimmune disease, including celiac disease.[2] Hopefully, this study will provide some much needed answers. Now a Spanish group of scientists has produced further evidence supporting a possible role for gut bacteria in the pathogenesis of celiac disease by investigating whether gut microflora present in the feces of celiac disease patients participates in the pro-inflammatory activity of celiac disease.[3]
    The makeup of fecal microflora in celiac disease patients differs significantly from that of healthy subjects. To determine whether gut microflora is a participant in the pro-inflammatory milieu of celiac disease, the Spanish research team incubated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy adults with fecal microflora obtained from 26 active celiac disease children, 18 symptom-free celiac disease children on a gluten-free diet, and 20 healthy children. The scientists additionally investigated possible regulatory roles of Bifidobacterium longum ES1 and B. bifidum ES2 obtained from the feces of healthy individuals, co-incubating the Bifidobacterium with the test subject fecal microflora and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.
    Fecal micrflora from both active and, notably, treated, symptom-free celiac children caused a significant increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and a decrease in anti-inflammatory IL-10 production in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures compared to the fecal microflora from healthy children. However, cultures co-incubated with the Bifidobacterium strains exhibited a suppression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine production and an increase in IL-10 production. IL-10 is a cytokine which promotes immune tolerance.
    The scientists concluded that the makeup of the gut flora of celiacs may contribute to pro-inflammation in celiac disease, possibly in a synergy with gliadin, and that certain strains of Bifidobacterium appear to suppress and reverse pro-inflammatory effects and offering therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of celiac disease.
    It would have been interesting if the scientists had also investigated the effect of adding vitamin D to the fecal microflora and the peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. It is likely the addition of vitamin D might also have resulted in a suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and an increase in IL-10 production. This is borne out by experiments with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its culture filtrate antigen in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures where the addition of vitamin D resulted in a suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and an increase in IL-10 production.[4] It is possible that celiac disease may be entirely prevented in infancy by routinely administrating prophylactic doses of vitamin D and probiotics containing specific strains of Bifidobacterium before gluten is introduced into the infant's diet. The vitamin D and Bifidobacterium strains may provide an IL-10 anti-inflammatory environment in which the immune system learns to respond tolerantly to gluten, forever preventing the onset of celiac disease.
    The fact that certain strains of fecal Bifidobacterium from healthy individuals appear to suppress celiac disease inflammation brings to mind the concept of "fecal bacteriotherapy" or "fecal transplant", a therapy developed and used in practice by the world reknown Australian gastroenterologist, Prof. Thomas J. Borody, M.D., known best for his development of a triple-antibiotic treatment for H. pylori and ulcerative colitis.[5] Fecal bacteriotherapy involves transplanting feces from a healthly, screened donor into an ailing patient with a persistant bacterial gastrointestinal disorder whose own gut flora has first been reduced or eliminated with antibiotics. The fecal microflora from the healthy donor reseeds the gut of the ailing patient with a healthy mix of intestinal microflora curing the gastrointestinal disorder. The Bifidobacterium research done by the Spanish researchers suggests that fecal bacteriotherapy might be an option to treat or cure celiac disease in adults, replacing gut flora causing intolerance to gluten with a healthy mix of gut flora that encourages tolerance to gluten.
    Sources

    [1] Do Vitamin D Deficiency, Gut Bacteria, and Gluten Combine in Infancy to Cause Celiac Disease?
    Roy S. Jamron
    https://www.celiac.com/articles/21605/
    [2] European Study Will Focus On Relation Of Gut Bacteria to Autoimmune Disease in Children
    Roy S. Jamron
    https://www.celiac.com/articles/21607/
    [3] Journal of Inflammation 2008, 5:19.
    Bifidobacterium strains suppress in vitro the pro-inflammatory milieu triggered by the large intestinal microbiota of coeliac patients.
    Medina M, De Palma G, Ribes-Koninckx C, Calabuig M, Sanza Y.
    http://www.journal-inflammation.com/content/pdf/1476-9255-5-19.pdf
    [4] J Clin Immunol. 2008 Jul;28(4):306-13.
    Regulatory role of promoter and 3' UTR variants of vitamin D receptor gene on cytokine response in pulmonary tuberculosis.
    Selvaraj P, Vidyarani M, Alagarasu K, Prabhu Anand S, Narayanan PR.
    http://www.springerlink.com/content/d67236620021j84u/
    [5] Prof. Thomas J. Borody, M.D., Bio and Publication List http://www.cdd.com.au/html/hospital/clinicalstaff/borody.html http://www.cdd.com.au/html/expertise/publications.html

    Kristina Campbell
    Study Finds Gut Bacteria can Affect Intestines' Protective Layer
    Celiac.com 03/15/2011 - For celiacs, it's not really the cinnamon bun that's the enemy. Nor the pizza crust, nor the ravioli. It's the gliadin in these foods - the alcohol-soluble portion of the gluten protein - that's the real culprit.
    Gliadin is the "gladiator" of the human digestive tract. When we ingest gliadin, enzymes try to break it down into a form that can be absorbed by the small intestine. But gliadin resists, fighting hard to remain intact.
    A regular small intestine has, like any good fortress, a protective wall: the mucosal lining of the intestine. This layer of mucus normally acts as a barrier against gliadin's assaults. But in a celiac intestine, the mucosal lining is permeable. With gliadin's destructive power enhanced by its enzyme sidekick, tissue Transglutaminase (tTG), it quickly gets past this poorly-guarded layer.
    Scientists are working to put their finger on exactly what makes the mucosal lining of a celiac's small intestine so permeable.
    Now a January study by Czech researchers found at least one thing that affects the permeability of the intestinal mucosa: gut bacteria.
    In this study, called "Role of Intestinal Bacteria in Gliadin-Induced Changes in Intestinal Mucosa: Study in Germ-Free Rats", researchers tied off sections of rats' intestines and introduced various kinds of bacteria to each section. They wanted to measure the effect that these bacteria had on the intestinal mucus - or more specifically, on the goblet cells that produce the intestinal mucus. To ensure that the kinds of bacteria in the rats' intestines were under experimental control, the rats had been raised from birth in germ-free conditions.
    They found that introducing gliadin to the intestines had the effect of decreasing the mucus-producing cells, thereby eroding the intestines' protective layer. No big surprises there - gliadin is a fighter, a digestive "gladiator", after all.
    But when they added strains of so-called harmful bacteria, Escherichia coli (otherwise known as E coli) or Shigella, the mucus-producing cells decreased even more. The cells first secreted massive amounts of mucus, then promptly exhausted themselves and gave up. This left the intestine looking very similar to that of a person in the early stages of celiac disease, say the researchers.
    But the tale did indeed have a happy ending. Along came the good bacteria, Bifidobacterium bifidum (or "Biff" for short). The mucus-producing cells in the small intestine increased when Biff was present. In fact, Biff was able to partially reverse the mucus-decreasing effects of E coli and Shigella.
    The researchers concluded that the composition of gut bacteria has an effect on the protective mucus of the intestines: an overgrowth of bad bacteria decreases the protective layer, while the addition of good bacteria increases the protective layer. Their study may eventually lead to treatment options for human celiacs, by finding ways to protect tender intestines from the harmful effects of gliadin.
    Source:

    PLoS One. 2011 Jan 13;6(1):e16169

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/09/2015 - Do you suffer from persistent celiac symptoms in spite of following a strict gluten-free diet and having normal small bowel mucosa? Many celiac patients do. Moreover, typical explanations, such as accidental gluten-intake or the presence of other gastrointestinal disease, do not account for all of the symptoms in these patients.
    Recent studies have suggested that changes in intestinal microbiota are associated with autoimmune disorders, including celiac disease.
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine if abnormal intestinal microbiota may in fact be associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in gluten-free celiac disease patients. The research team included Pirjo Wacklin PhD, Pilvi Laurikka, Katri Lindfors PhD, Pekka Collin MD, Teea Salmi MD, Marja-Leena Lähdeaho MD, Päivi Saavalainen PhD, Markku Mäki MD, Jaana Mättö PhD, Kalle Kurppa MD, and Katri Kaukinen MD.
    They are variously associated with the Finnish Red Cross Blood Service, Helsinki, Finland; School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; the Tampere Centre for Child Health Research at the University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland; the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, in Tampere, Finland; the Department of Dermatology at Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, Finland; the Research Programs Unit of the Immunobiology, and Department of Medical Genetics at the Haartman Institute of the University of Helsinki in Helsinki, Finland; the Department of Internal Medicine at Tampere University Hospital in Tampere, and with Seinäjoki Central Hospital in Seinäjoki, Finland,
    The team used 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to analyze duodenal microbiota in 18 gluten-free celiac patients suffering from persistent symptoms, and 18 gluten-free celiac patients without symptoms.
    All celiac patients had been following a strict gluten-free diet for several years, and had restored small bowel mucosa and tested negative for celiac autoantibodies.
    The team rated symptoms using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale, and found that gluten-free celiac disease patients with persistent symptoms had different duodenal bacteria than celiac patients without symptoms.
    Gluten-free celiac patients with persistent symptoms had a higher relative abundance of Proteobacteria (P=0.04) and a lower abundance of Bacteroidetes (P=0.01) and Firmicutes (P=0.05). Moreover, they had a much narrower range of bacteria types in their guts.
    The discovery that dysbiosis of microbiota is associated with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms in gluten-free celiac patients offers a new avenue of treatment for such patients.
    Source:
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109(12):1933-1941.

    Jefferson Adams
    Location Change in Gut Pathobiont Key to Autoimmunity in Mice and Humans
    Celiac.com 03/26/2018 - Researchers are making serious headway in understanding critical aspects of celiac disease and other autoimmune conditions. However, despite numerous studies showing links between gut microbiota and immune diseases, researchers still don’t know very much about role of gut microbiota in autoimmunity.  One team of researchers recently found that translocation of a gut pathobiont, Enterococcus gallinarum, to the liver and other systemic tissues triggers autoimmune responses in a genetic background predisposing to autoimmunity. What does that mean, exactly, and what else did they find?
    First of all, it’s important to understand that a pathobiont is any potentially disease-causing organism which, normally, lives in symbiosis with its host. So, these are organisms that normally cause no problems at all, but which, under certain circumstances, can cause disease.
    The research team included S. Manfredo Vieira, M. Hiltensperger, V. Kumar, D. Zegarra-Ruiz, C. Dehner, N. Khan, F. R. C. Costa, E. Tiniakou, T. Greiling, W. Ruff, A. Barbieri, C. Kriegel, S. S. Mehta, J. R. Knight, D. Jain, A. L. Goodman, and M. A. Kriegel.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Immunobiology, the Department of Medicine, and the Department of Pathology, the Yale Center for Genome Analysis, the Department of Microbial Pathogenesis and Microbial Sciences Institute at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, CT, USA, the Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Ribeirao Preto Medical School, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil, the Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, and the Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
    The team’s study data for this model showed that antibiotic treatment prevented mortality, suppressed growth of E. gallinarum in tissues, and eliminated pathogenic autoantibodies and T cells, while Hepatocyte–E. gallinarum cocultures induced autoimmune-promoting factors. Pathobiont translocation in monocolonized and autoimmune-prone mice induced autoantibodies and caused mortality, which could be prevented by an intramuscular vaccine targeting the pathobiont. 
    Liver biopsies of autoimmune patients yielded E. gallinarum–specific DNA, while cocultures with human hepatocytes replicated the murine findings, which means that similar processes likely occur in susceptible humans. 
    This study shows that a gut pathobiont can change locations and can promote autoimmunity in people with a genetic predisposition. This is an important revelation that will help researchers to better understand the mechanisms that trigger celiac disease, and may lead to better diagnosis and treatment options in the future.

    Source:
    Science  09 Mar 2018: Vol. 359, Issue 6380, pp. 1156-1161. DOI: 10.1126/science.aar7201

  • Popular Contributors

×