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    Celiac Disease Link to Autoimmune Disease


    Tina Turbin
    Celiac Disease Link to Autoimmune Disease

    Celiac.com 06/28/2010 - Studies on the genetic links to celiac disease are leading to more research which may lead to new and more effective ways to treat the disease, an exciting  prospect for celiacs who may want to enjoy some gluten now and then.  Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease, the source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, affecting about 1% of the population and 300 million Americans. The disease attacks the villi,the finger-like structure which line the small intestine, leading to stomach troubles and malabsorption of nutrients. Left untreated, it can cause severe health conditions and complications such as anemia, osteoporosis, miscarriage, and even cancer.

    David van Heel, a gastrointestinal genetics professor at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, headed a group of researchers from around the world who studied the genetic maps of more than 9,400 celiacs.

    British researchers have found what they term “substantial” evidence that the genes which are connected with celiac disease are also linked to other autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis. As a result, scientists are able to understand how the genetic risk factors for the disease operate—by changing the number of immune system genes that cells make. Furthermore, it is now understood that there are “hundreds” of genetic risk factors, which means that scientists should be able to “have a good guess at nearly half of the genetic risk at present," van Heel wrote in the Nature Genetics journal in his published study.

    Why is that only 3% of celiac Americans have been properly diagnosed? It’s likely that they or their doctors haven’t even heard of the disease. Research on celiac disease in the U.S. depends completely on the generosity of benefactors for its funding. Without charitable donations, there would be no way to continue this research and the efforts to raise awareness. Out of the estimated fifty autoimmune diseases that have been discovered by doctors, it is the only one for which research isn’t supported by the U.S. government.

    I spent years running in circles with doctors who had no clue as to the cause of my painful symptoms, which finally drove me to research my symptoms on my own. I’m grateful lto have been properly diagnosed, but managing the gluten-free diet can be a challenge. The prospect of a pill to offset genetic factors will appeal to many celiacs like myself. Although the treatment for celiac disease is simple, it calls for a lot of work and can be disheartening at times, requiring a total lifestyle change and a lot of home cooking.

    With this genetic research in the area of celiac disease, we can look forward to more research, more awareness, and perhaps another treatment option. Meanwhile, it’s  best to keep doing our parts to raise awareness and funds for research.

    Source: Reuters


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    Guest Tom Sweeney

    Posted

    I am not a doctor, but I am 70 years old and just recently I discovered that gluten has caused

    me many of health problems over the years. I was diagnosed at age 66 with (AS) Ankylosing Spondylitis after I had a flare up and was very sick. I then began to read about my AS condition

    and realized I had symptoms of AS around my early twenties. I then found my brothers and sisters had autoimmune diseases also. After reading about gluten I came to the conclusion that there is a link between autoimmune diseases and gluten. It seems to me that gluten starts the process of our immune system going haywire and our immune system causes more fighting due to gluten which now causes other autoimmune diseases. Why I don't know? But I would like to help if I can be of any assistance as a gluten suffer.

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  • About Me

    Tina Turbin is a world-renowned Celiac advocate who researches, writes, and consults about the benefits of the gluten-free, paleo-ish, low carb and keto diets, and is a full time recipe developer and founder of PaleOmazing.com. Tina also founded and manages the popular website, GlutenFreeHelp.info, voted the #2 .info website in the world. Tina believes that celiacs need to be educated to be able to make informed decisions and that Paleo needs to be tailored to the individual’s physiology to obtain desired results. You can reach her at: INFO@PaleOmazing.com.

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