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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    CELIAC STUDY: NON-INVASIVE INTESTINAL EVALUATION SHOWS PROMISE


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 05/21/2009 - To better diagnose celiac disease, assess intestinal damage, and monitor treatment over the long-term, doctors are looking to develop a whole new set of non-invasive evaluation tools.


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    One of the tools currently of interest are fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), these are small cytosolic proteins found in enterocytes (tall columnar cells and responsible for the final digestion and absorption of nutrients, electrolytes and water). FABPs are reliable indicators of intestinal mucosal damage, and are potentially useful for non-invasive assessment of intestinal damage in celiac patients.

    A team of researchers in the Institute of Nutrition and Toxicology Research at Maastricht University, as well as the departments of Surgery, Pediatrics and Internal Medicine at University Hospital Maastricht, recently set out to assess the potential use of FABPs in non-invasive assessment of intestinal damage in celiac disease. The study team was made up of J. P. Derikx, A. C. Vreugdenhil, A. M. Van den Neucker, J.Grootjans J, A. A. van Bijnen, J.G. Damoiseaux, L. W. van Heurn, E. Heineman, and W. A. Buurman.

    They began by examining the distribution and microscopic localization of FABPs in healthy human intestinal tissue. They then checked circulating levels of intestinal (I)-FABP and liver (L)-FABP in 26 healthy control subjects, and in 13 patients with biopsy-proven celiac disease, both before and after initiating a gluten-free diet.  Ten celiac subjects underwent reevaluation within a year beginning a gluten-free diet.

    They found that I-FABP and L-FABP are common in the small intestine, particularly in the jejunum. FABPs also show up in cells on the upper part of the villi, the part that is first to be damaged in celiac disease.

    They also found that people with untreated, biopsy-proven celiac disease have substantially higher circulating levels of FABPs as compared with healthy control subjects (I-FABP: 784.7 pg/mL vs. 172.7 pg/mL, P<0.001; L-FABP: 48.4 ng/mL vs. 10.4 ng/mL, P<0.001). These levels return to normal when patients adopt a gluten-free diet.
    According to the team, the monitoring of FABP circulating levels shows strong promise as a non-invasive means of diagnosing and assessing intestinal damage in celiac disease, as well as in long-term non-invasive monitoring of treatment and gluten-free diet compliance.

    Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2009 Apr 6.


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    Roy Jamron
    This article originally appeared in the Spring 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 05/10/2004 - Identical twins enter life from the same womb sharing the same genetic code, the same family, the same home, largely experiencing the same environment as they develop from infancy through childhood and mature into adults. When celiac disease strikes one identical twin, the odds are the other twin also has celiac disease. Twin studies lead to the conclusion that celiac disease is strongly linked to genetic factors. Yet one identical twin may develop celiac disease while the other twin may remain completely free of celiac disease for decades if not for a lifetime.
    One study looked at 20 pairs of identical twins and 27 pairs of fraternal twins where at least one twin of the pair was known to have celiac disease. In 75% of the pairs of identical twins, both twins had celiac disease. In contrast, in only 11% of the pairs of fraternal twins did both twins have celiac disease. However, in 25% of the 20 identical twin pairs studied, one twin of the pair did not have celiac disease1. In another study which followed 5 pairs of female identical twins for 11-23 years (at least one twin of the pair having celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis), it was found that two of the twins who began the study with neither celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis remained free of the disease throughout the study2. In other words, something beyond genetics, some environmental factor, seems to be responsible for the onset of celiac disease. Exactly what is it that makes one twin intolerant to gluten and not the other?
    Looking for Answers
    To find an answer, one might start by asking when do signs of an intolerance to gluten first begin to emerge? A recent study in the UK looked at a screened sample of 5,470 children aged 7 years old and found 54 who tested positive for both tTG antibodies and IgA-EMA (tissue transglutaminase and antiendomysial antibodies) indicating celiac disease is likely present. This 1% prevalence in children is comparable to the 1% prevalence of celiac disease in adults in the UK. Since the prevalence of celiac disease is not greater in adults, this suggests that the onset of celiac disease begins in early childhood, even in cases where celiac disease is not diagnosed until later in adulthood. The authors of this study concluded, “The search for the trigger resulting in the breakdown of immune tolerance to gluten therefore needs to focus on infancy and intrauterine life3.”
    Breast-Feeding
    Breast-feeding has long been thought to delay or reduce the risk of developing celiac disease in children. This effect has been attributed to a number of potentially protective milk components and antibodies passed from the mother. Studies relying on questionnaires have found that the onset of celiac disease in children is significantly delayed if gluten is introduced into the diet while the child is still being breast-fed4-7. The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF), a component of breast milk, was studied in newborn rats. Interferon-gamma and gliadin, a gluten protein, were administered to rat pups to induce gluten enteropathy. Celiac disease-like villus atrophy was found in rat pups fed an artificial milk diet without EGF but not in breast-fed pups or pups supplemented with EGF8. Recent research shows that breast milk also passes bacterial flora from mother to newborn9. Growth factors found in human milk have been shown to aid in establishing predominant species of commensal bacteria in the gut of breast-fed infants10. The makeup of microflora which colonize the gut in early infancy is dependant on many factors, including whether babies are bottle-fed or exclusively breast-fed, whether or not delivered by caesarean section, on treatment in neonatal intensive care units, hygienic conditions, and antimicrobial procedures. Initially, it is the maternal microflora that is the source of bacteria for the newborn gut. A diet of breast milk induces the development of a flora rich in Bifidobacterium in full-term infants11. The possibility that these microflora play critical symbiotic roles in the development of the intestine and its immunological functions has not yet been considered as a factor in the onset of celiac disease.
    The Beneficial Roles of Gut Bacteria
    Over 500 species of bacteria may be present in the human gut in concentrations of between 100 billion to 1 trillion microbes per gram adding up to about 95% of the total number of cells in the human body12,13. For many years it has been known that gut bacteria play an important and beneficial role in one’s health. Extraordinary new findings on how commensal microflora participate in early gut development and in the development of the immune system have been uncovered by recent research. Here is sampling of some of these discoveries:
    A study of 64 healthy formula and breast-fed infants, aged 0-6 months, examined fecal samples for intestinal colonization of Bacteriodes fragilis, Bifidobacterium-like, and Lactobacillus-like bacteria, and compared these results with counts of IgA, IgM, and IgG antibody-secreting cells in blood fluids drawn from the infants. The result was that infants colonized with B. fragilis at one month of age had significantly higher counts of IgA- and IgM-secreting cells at the age of two months than infants not colonized with B. fragilis. It was concluded that colonization timing and the type of bacteria colonizing the gut of newborns may influence the maturation of the naive immune system14.
    Bacteriodes thetaiotaomicron, a species abundant in the guts of humans and mice, has been the focus of much research, chosen because of its predominance in the microflora and ability to be genetically manipulated. Studies of this microbe introduced into the developing guts of gnotobiotic (germ-free) laboratory mice have found B. thetaiotaomicron seems to communicate with host cells in the intestine, altering and influencing gut development and function.
    One study has shown gene activity in the host is affected by B. thetaiotaomicron colonization. Using sophisticated DNA microarray devices, a comparison of gene expression of some 25,000 mouse genes was made between germ-free and B. thetaiotaomicron colonized mice. The activity of 118 genes was found to be increased or reduced by colonization. These genes are involved in several important intestinal functions, including nutrient absorption, intestinal permeability, toxin neutralization, intestinal blood vessel development, and postnatal gut maturation suggesting that these functions should be examined further in future studies15.
    An influence on fructose production in the gut by B. thetaiotaomicron was the first finding uncovered by researchers. Pre-weaned mice produce fructose sugar on the surface of cells lining the intestine providing a food source helping to establish commensal bacteria. B. thetaiotaomicron colonizing the gut of germ-free mice causes intestinal cells to continue fructose production after weaning. If B. thetaiotaomicron is not present after weaning, fructose synthesis stops. B. thetaiotaomicron actually senses when its supply of fructose is low and instructs the host to produce more fructose in response16.
    Gene activity findings led researchers to look at the development of the intricate network of intestinal blood vessels in mice raised germ-free and in mice raised colonized with B. thetaiotaomicron or normal gut flora. When the mice reached adulthood, capillary development in the intestines was examined. Capillary development in mice colonized with B. thetaiotaomicron or normal flora was normal and complex, but capillary development in the germ-free mice was immature and arrested. Further, it was, found for blood vessel development to occur, these microbes must interact with Paneth cells (epithelial cells located at the base of the “crypts” in the small intestine)17.
    The relationship of B. thetaiotaomicron with Paneth cells was further studied. It was discovered that Paneth cells produce a protein called angiogenin 4 or Ang4 and that Paneth cells are induced to express Ang4 by B. thetaiotaomicron. Ang4 and other angiogenins were found to exhibit bactericidal and fungicidal activities against certain known pathogens. It appears that B. thetaiotaomicron and other commensal microbes, which are themselves resistant to Ang4, take part in shaping the microbial ecology of the gut and innate immunity18.
    Another study found a relationship between commensal bacteria and the development of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in rabbits. GALT consists of lymphocytes and organized tissues called Peyer’s patches and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) located within the intestinal mucosa, which are involved in the induction of immunity and tolerance. During the first few months after birth, newborn animals and humans rely on antibodies passed maternally to fend off infections until the immune system can mature. After those first few months, a diversification of antibody repertoire normally takes place within the GALT. When, shortly after birth, the appendices of rabbits are tied-off and isolated to prevent colonization by microflora, GALT development within the appendices is arrested. Rabbit pups delivered sterilely, isolated and hand-reared on a sterile diet exhibited underdeveloped GALT and antibody repertoires. In further experimentation, a number of different bacteria species were introduced into surgically-rendered, germ-free appendices of rabbits. No bacteria species alone promoted GALT development. However, the combination of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacillus subtilis consistently resulted in the development of GALT and antibody repertoire. The conclusion is that specific combinations of microflora are required for GALT development19,20.
    In other research, the composition of commensal flora in rats was shown to alter intestinal permeability. Colonization with Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Streptococcus viridans significantly increased colonic wall permeability while colonization with the common probiotic strain, Lactobacillus brevis, significantly reduced permeability of the colon wall. Bacteroides fragilis induced only a slight permeability reduction21.
    Gut pathogens in combination with stimulation by cytokines such as TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) can cause cells of the intestinal epithelium to respond by releasing proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-8 (IL-8). A study found that probiotic strains, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, can suppress IL-8 secretion in intestinal epithelia when stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines. Hence, some probiotic strains of bacteria may be able to down-regulate inflammation in the gut22.
    Other beneficial functions of microflora include the fermentation and removal of non-digestible dietary residue and the mucus residue produced by the epithelia; the derivation of energy as short-chain fatty acids by fermentation of carbohydrates in the colon; the production of vitamins, particularly those of the B group and vitamin K; the absorption of minerals and ions including calcium, magnesium and iron; and the formation of a protective functional barrier against pathogens23,24.
    A Role for Bacteria in Celiac Disease?
    As can been seen, commensal microflora play a myriad of complex, diverse and important roles in normal health and development. Much remains to be investigated, and new roles and functions microflora play are waiting to be discovered. The possibility that commensal bacteria are involved in the pathogenesis of celiac disease cannot be overlooked. Certainly, differences in the mix of microflora could account for why one identical twin may develop celiac disease while the other does not. Could the mix of commensal bacteria in newborn infants set the stage for the development of celiac disease? Could the onset of celiac disease be triggered by an event such as illness, use of antibiotics, stress, or pregnancy which alters the mix of microflora opening the door to a pathogenic interaction with gluten? One recent study has already found an association between antibiotic use and the development of Crohn’s disease25.
    Over the course of the last few years, much new understanding of the pathogenesis of celiac disease has come to light, but a fundamental question remains unanswered: Why does the immune system fail to tolerate gluten in some people? A possible mechanism involving one or more unidentified species of commensal bacteria possibly explaining why tolerance to gluten fails will be proposed and discussed here.
    Tolerance and Immunity
    The subject of tolerance and immunity is involved and complex, and science remains far from fully comprehending its workings. At heart, is how the immune system decides to react when an antigen is first presented to a naive T cell. The response of the immune system to an antigen is mediated and regulated by cell secretions of numerous proteins called “cytokines” sensed by a multitude of receptors on the various specialized cells of the immune system. Structural components of pathogens are also sensed by immune cell receptors called “Toll-like receptors”. Antigens may be any substance foreign to the body and may or may not actually be harmful. They could be components of food, or could be components of either friendly or pathogenic organisms.
    In celiac disease, the antigens are those gluten peptides which survive the process of digestion. In the current understanding of celiac disease, these peptides are transported across the mucosal epithelium as polypeptides. In mainly the subepithelial region, gluten peptides undergo a process called deamidation by an enzyme called tissue transglutaminase (tTG). A peptide is a chain of amino acids. Deamidation is a process that converts glutamine amino acid components of a gluten peptide into glutamic acid components. In the lamina propria region of the intestines, deamidated gluten peptides are taken up by antigen presenting cells called dendritic cells and presented by HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 molecules on the surface of dendritic cells to receptors of gluten-sensitive naive CD4+ T cells (Note celiac disease here refers to a “cluster of differentiation” number, a numbering system for the cell-surface molecules which identify T cell type). Activated CD4+ T cells then differentiate and proliferate. Some T cells interact with B cells which, in turn, then differentiate into plasma cells producing antigliadin, antiendomysial and anti-tTG antibodies. Other T cells become natural killer or cytotoxic T cells, secreting cytokines which cause inflammation and damage to the enterocytes in the epithelium. Connective tissue cells called “fibroblasts” increase their output of matrix metalloproteinase enzymes which may play an active role in villus atrophy. Intraepithelial lymphocytes also increase, but their role is not clear26-29.
    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes encode the class II molecules DQ2 and DQ8, the key genetic risk factors in celiac disease. The HLA system is the human version of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA class II molecules are expressed on the surface of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells. Virtually all celiac disease patients carry DQ2 or DQ8, but carrying DQ2 or DQ8 alone does not confer celiac disease. DQ2 and DQ8 molecules may be encoded by several different haplotypes. Haplotypes are combinations of alternative genes for the same trait (alleles) occupying different locations on a chromosome which tend to be inherited as a group. These DQ2 and DQ8 molecules play a central role in the pathogenesis of celiac disease. The function of HLA class II molecules is to bind peptide antigens and present them to CD4+ T-cell receptors. The pattern of amino acids in the makeup of the chain that forms the peptide antigen is called an epitope, and that pattern is crucial to the binding between HLA molecule and peptide. It is the misfortune of celiac disease patients that epitopes of deamidated gluten peptides just happen to match up and firmly anchor into the binding grooves of DQ2 and DQ8 molecules. This strong binding results in the activation of CD4+ T cells and the subsequent processes which damage the intestinal epithelia. But why is it that CD4+ T cells are not activated in everyone who possesses the appropriate HLA-DQ2 and -DQ8 haplotypes? The question arises again. Why is one identical twin tolerant to gluten and not the other?26-30
    Dendritic Cells
    Whether an outcome of tolerance or intolerance results when a dendritic cell presents an antigen to a naive T cell depends on many factors. A dendritic cell is a special type of white blood cell (leukocyte) which circulates throughout the body looking to acquire antigens. Dendritic cells engulf and internalize antigens through a process called endocytosis. In receptor-mediated endocytosis, dendritic cells express a variety of surface receptors to capture protein antigens. In macropinocytosis, dendritic cells surround and “drink up” soluble antigens. In phagocytosis, dendritic cells engulf pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, dead or infected cells, or their products. After digestion and processing, the antigens are bound to HLA (or MHC) molecules and expressed on the surface of dendritic cells for presentation to T cells. Antigen presentation occurs after dendritic cells migrate to the lymph nodes which are rich with T cells. T cell activation also requires secondary stimulation by costimulatory molecules expressed on the dendritic cell surface. Dendritic cells have three stages in their life cycle: Precursor, immature and mature. Precursor dendritic cells arise from the bone marrow. Subsets of precursor dendritic cells have been identified that grow and differ with regard to observable characteristics (phenotype), function and anatomical location. Studies have linked dendritic cell subsets with particular functions such as T cell differentiation or tolerance induction. Immature dendritic cells spread throughout tissues seeking antigens. Dendritic cells enter the mature stage when they reach the lymph nodes after antigen capture and having become primed and ready to activate T cells with antigens and costimulatory molecules. The processing of antigens produces roughly 100,000 to 300,000 peptide-laden HLA molecules on the dendritic cell surface, most peptides represented by about 100 copies. A single mature dendritic cell is capable of stimulating 100–3,000 T cells31-34.
    Immature dendritic cells are capable of phagocytosis of bacteria. Dendritic cell phagocytosis of Salmonella and Borrelia burgdorferi has been observed and studied. Immature dendritic cells roaming the lamina propria below the epithelial cells of the intestine not only capture bacteria which invade and cross the epithelial barrier, but have been observed reaching through the tight junctions between epithelial cells with their dendrite arms to directly sample non-invasive bacteria in the gut lumen and mucosa tissues outside the epithelium34-37.
    Immature dendritic cells express a variety of surface receptors which when stimulated cause dendritic cells to mature and respond in specific ways which can result in tolerance or immune activity. These receptors include Toll-like receptors (TLR), cytokine receptors, TNF (tumor necrosis factor) receptor, immunoglobulin (antibody) receptors, and sensors for cell death. TNF and other cykotine inflammatory mediators signal infections. In particular, interleukin-1 (IL-1) can prevent oral tolerance in mice by altering the response of normally tolerogenic dendritic cells into an active immune response32,34.
    Toll-like receptors are known as pattern recognition receptors which identify structural components found only on the surface of bacteria and other pathogens. These components are referred to as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). At least 10 types of TLR have been identified in humans and given the designations, TLR1-TLR10. Examples of PAMP include microbial carbohydrates like the toxin lipopolysaccharides (LPS), flagellin, products from bacterial cell walls, bacterial RNA and DNA. Signaling through different TLR evokes distinct biological responses. TLR expressed differently by different dendritic cell subsets may determine the manner in which dendritic cell subsets respond to particular microbial structures34,39.
    Mature dendritic cells can produce cytokines while activating CD4+ T cells which may influence T cell differentiation and function. Activated T cells divide and proliferate and differentiate into a variety of types. Tolerance and immunity induction are influenced most by differentiation into type 1 and type 2 helper T cells (Th1 and Th2) and regulatory T cells. The type of cytokines produced by the T cells determine their classification. Th2 responses favor tolerance. Th1 responses favor immunity and inflammation. Regulatory T cells suppress immune responses. IL-10 produced by dendritic cells appears to contribute to Th2 and regulatory T cell responses. Dendritic cell production of IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23 contribute to a Th1 response34,40.
    Why Does Tolerance to Gluten Fail?
    Okay. So why does the immune system fail to tolerate gluten in celiac disease? The immune system receives and responds to all kinds of signals from a pathogen, but how can a simple gluten peptide turn this complex immune machinery into a force against itself? Thinking about this leads to a very provocative question:
    What if instead of responding to gluten peptides alone, the immune system responds to a pathogenic gut bacteria which routinely ingests gluten peptides?
    A 33 amino acid gluten peptide has been identified as the primary initiator of the inflammatory response in celiac disease. This peptide contains a number of amino acid sequences which correspond to epitopes known to activate T cells and initiate celiac disease response. In particular, this 33-mer peptide was identified because it remained intact in the residue of a solution of gliadin mixed with gastric and pancreatic enzymes. This demonstrates some gluten peptides are difficult to breakdown by normal digestive processes. Another experiment identified a 17 amino acid gluten peptide which also contained epitopes associated with celiac disease41,42.
    Bacteria do not ingest nutrients in the normal sense. Nutrients are transported across cell membranes via several different mechanisms. Transported nutrients are necessarily limited in size. Nutrients are broken down externally by enzymes and by processes such as fermentation, an oxidation process resulting from acids produced by bacteria. Growth factors consisting of purines, pyrimidines, vitamins and amino acids are required by some bacteria in order to grow. Other bacteria are able to synthesize these essential growth factors. Researchers have found that some bacteria can transport and internalize amino acids in the form of peptides. Studies so far have found peptides up to 18 amino acids in length can be internalized by bacteria43-46.
    Epitopes of gluten peptides deamidated by tissue transglutaminase (tTG) are believed central to celiac disease pathogenesis. However, a study of gluten response in children with celiac disease found that T cells can respond to native gluten peptides independent of deamidation47. Celiac disease may begin its course without deamidation. As the disease progresses, inflammation may cause an increase in expression of tTG. An increase in tTG expression has been shown during wound healing, in liver injury, and in response to an inflammatory stimulus by lipopolysaccharide48-50. Through a process called epitope spreading and with the increase in tTG expression, deamidation of gluten peptides is more likely to occur and T cell response to deamidated gluten peptides likely develops. tTG is expressed in the epithelial brush border and extracellularly in the subepithelial region26 (The brush border is composed of the microvilli found on each individual epithelial cell).
    In the course of evolution of bacteria in the gut, it would seem highly plausible that at least one or more bacteria species have evolved and adapted in some way to transport, internalize and utilize gluten peptides as a source of amino acids. Since tTG is expressed in the epithelial brush border, deamidated gluten peptides are available to such bacteria (though in the early stage of celiac disease deamidation may not be required). If these bacteria colonize the gut and exhibit some pathogenic characteristic, such as expressing lipopolysaccharide, dendritic cells may be signaled to reach through the epithelial barrier into the lumen to sample and phagocytize the bacteria. When this bacteria is digested and processed by the dendritic cells, the antigens bound to HLA molecules and expressed on the dendritic cell surface are likely to include the difficult to breakdown, intact gluten peptides that have been internalized by the bacteria. As far as the immune system is concerned, these gluten peptides are indistinguishable from the other bacterial peptides bound to HLA molecules expressed on the dendritic cell surface. When these gluten peptide antigens are bound to HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 molecules and presented to CD4+ T cells, the T cells simultaneously receive all the signals telling them that the gluten peptide is an antigen from a pathogenic bacteria. The result is that the immune system responds to the presence of gluten as though pathogenic bacteria were present. Such gluten-ingesting bacteria may be the missing link in the pathogenesis of Celiac Disease.
    If these bacteria exist, there is now a clear explanation as to why one identical twin may develop celiac disease and not the other. Of course, the presence of such a bacteria in the gut of one twin and not the other would fully explain the discordance. It is also possible that such a bacteria may exist in both twins, but is kept under control by the mix of commensal bacteria colonizing the gut of one twin. Some disturbance to this mix, such as an infection or use of antibiotics, might provide an opportunity for this gluten-ingesting bacteria to colonize and proliferate to a level where its pathogenic properties, such as production of endotoxins, are sensed by the immune system initiating the onset of celiac disease. The existence of such bacteria could also explain why there may be varying degrees of gluten sensitivity, even in individuals without DQ2 and DQ8 molecules.
    The possibility that these gluten-ingesting bacteria may exist raises another intriguing question: If these gluten-ingesting bacteria are controlled or eliminated from the gut, could tolerance to gluten be restored? There could be a very real possibility that celiac disease might be cured by eliminating these bacteria. After all, peptic ulcers can be cured by eliminating Helicobacter pylori.
    The Future
    So where should research go from here? The most obvious path would be first to try to find and identify any gut bacteria that has gluten peptides present within its cell membranes. From there, the possible link to celiac disease could be studied. Additionally, it would be quite valuable to initiate a large long-term study of the makeup of commensal bacteria in identical twins beginning at birth via fecal samples. By comparing the differences in microflora and the onset and discordance of diseases in identical twins over many years, the relationships of specific species of bacteria to specific diseases, including celiac disease, could be established. And if it proves to be true that gluten-ingesting bacteria cause celiac disease, a similar mechanism involving bacteria and peptides from other proteins may be the root cause for many other autoimmune diseases. A whole class of autoimmune diseases might be cured by eliminating specific species of bacteria.
    Roy Jamron holds degrees in physics and engineering from the University of Michigan and the University of California at Davis and actively pursues and investigates research on celiac disease and related disorders.

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Dunne C, O'Mahony L, Murphy L, Thornton G, Morrissey D, O'Halloran S, Feeney M, Flynn S, Fitzgerald G, Daly C, Kiely B, O'Sullivan GC, Shanahan F, Collins JK. In vitro selection criteria for probiotic bacteria of human origin: correlation with in vivo findings. Am J Clin Nutr 2001 Feb;73(2 Suppl):386S-392S. Mai V, Morris JG Jr. Colonic bacterial flora: changing understandings in the molecular age. J Nutr 2004 Feb;134(2):459-64 Gronlund MM, Arvilommi H, Kero P, Lehtonen OP, Isolauri E. Importance of intestinal colonisation in the maturation of humoral immunity in early infancy: a prospective follow up study of healthy infants aged 0-6 months. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed 2000 Nov;83(3):F186-92. Hooper LV, Wong MH, Thelin A, Hansson L, Falk PG, Gordon JI. Molecular analysis of commensal host-microbial relationships in the intestine. Science 2001 Feb 2;291(5505):881-4. Hooper LV, Xu J, Falk PG, Midtvedt T, Gordon JI. A molecular sensor that allows a gut commensal to control its nutrient foundation in a competitive ecosystem. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 1999 Aug 17;96(17):9833-8. Stappenbeck TS, Hooper LV, Gordon JI. Developmental regulation of intestinal angiogenesis by indigenous microbes via Paneth cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2002 Nov 26;99(24):15451-5. Hooper LV, Stappenbeck TS, Hong CV, Gordon JI. Angiogenins: a new class of microbicidal proteins involved in innate immunity. Nat Immunol 2003 Mar;4(3):269-73. Lanning D, Sethupathi P, Rhee KJ, Zhai SK, Knight KL. Intestinal microflora and diversification of the rabbit antibody repertoire. J Immunol 2000 Aug 15;165(4):2012-9. Rhee KJ, Sethupathi P, Driks A, Lanning DK, Knight KL. Role of commensal bacteria in development of gut-associated lymphoid tissues and preimmune antibody repertoire. J Immunol 2004 Jan 15;172(2):1118-24. Garcia-Lafuente A, Antolin M, Guarner F, Crespo E, Malagelada JR. Modulation of colonic barrier function by the composition of the commensal flora in the rat. Gut 2001 Apr;48(4):503-7. Bai AP, Ouyang Q, Zhang W, Wang CH, Li SF. Probiotics inhibit TNF-alpha-induced interleukin-8 secretion of HT29 cells. World J Gastroenterol 2004 Feb 1;10(3):455-7. Guarner F, Malagelada JR. Gut flora in health and disease. Lancet 2003 Feb 8;361(9356):512-9. Hill MJ. Intestinal flora and endogenous vitamin synthesis. Eur J Cancer Prev 1997 Mar;6 Suppl 1:S43-5. Card T, Logan RF, Rodrigues LC, Wheeler JG. Antibiotic use and the development of Crohn's disease. Gut 2004 Feb;53(2):246-50. Sollid LM. Coeliac disease: dissecting a complex inflammatory disorder. Nat Rev Immunol 2002 Sep;2(9):647-55. Dewar D, Pereira SP, Ciclitira PJ. The pathogenesis of coeliac disease. Int J Biochem Cell Biol 2004 Jan;36(1):17-24. Farrell RJ, Kelly CP. Celiac sprue. N Engl J Med 2002 Jan 17;346(3):180-8. Daum S, Bauer U, Foss HD, Schuppan D, Stein H, Riecken EO, Ullrich R. Increased expression of mRNA for matrix metalloproteinases-1 and -3 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 in intestinal biopsy specimens from patients with coeliac disease. Gut 1999 Jan;44(1):17-25. Louka AS, Sollid LM. HLA in coeliac disease: unravelling the complex genetics of a complex disorder. Tissue Antigens 2003 Feb;61(2):105-17. DeMeyer ES, Baar J. Dendritic Cells: The Sentry Cells of the Immune System. Oncology Education Services, Inc. http://oes.digiton.com/dcell/ Guermonprez P, Valladeau J, Zitvogel L, Thery C, Amigorena S. Antigen presentation and T cell stimulation by dendritic cells. Annu Rev Immunol 2002;20:621-67. Klein J, Sato A. The HLA system. First of two parts. N Engl J Med 2000 Sep 7;343(10):702-9. Stagg AJ, Hart AL, Knight SC, Kamm MA. The dendritic cell: its role in intestinal inflammation and relationship with gut bacteria. Gut 2003 Oct;52(10):1522-9. Sundquist M, Rydstrom A, Wick MJ. Immunity to Salmonella from a dendritic point of view. 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Structural basis for gluten intolerance in celiac sprue. Science 2002 Sep 27;297(5590):2275-9. Anderson RP, Degano P, Godkin AJ, Jewell DP, Hill AV. In vivo antigen challenge in celiac disease identifies a single transglutaminase-modified peptide as the dominant A-gliadin T-cell epitope. Nat Med 2000 Mar;6(3):337-42. Todar K. Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology. Univ of Wisconsin Department of Bacteriology. http://www.textbookofbacteriology.net Monnet V. Bacterial oligopeptide-binding proteins. Cell Mol Life Sci 2003 Oct;60(10):2100-14. Foucaud C, Hemme D, Desmazeaud M. Peptide utilization by Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. Lett Appl Microbiol 2001 Jan;32(1):20-5. Detmers FJ, Kunji ER, Lanfermeijer FC, Poolman B, Konings WN. Kinetics and specificity of peptide uptake by the oligopeptide transport system of Lactococcus lactis. Biochemistry 1998 Nov 24;37(47):16671-9. Vader W, Kooy Y, Van Veelen P, De Ru A, Harris D, Benckhuijsen W, Pena S, Mearin L, Drijfhout JW, Koning F. The gluten response in children with celiac disease is directed toward multiple gliadin and glutenin peptides. Gastroenterology 2002 Jun;122(7):1729-37. Haroon ZA, Hettasch JM, Lai TS, Dewhirst MW, Greenberg CS. Tissue transglutaminase is expressed, active, and directly involved in rat dermal wound healing and angiogenesis. FASEB J 1999 Oct;13(13):1787-95. Nardacci R, Lo Iacono O, Ciccosanti F, Falasca L, Addesso M, Amendola A, Antonucci G, Craxi A, Fimia GM, Iadevaia V, Melino G, Ruco L, Tocci G, Ippolito G, Piacentini M. Transglutaminase type II plays a protective role in hepatic injury. Am J Pathol 2003 Apr;162(4):1293-303. Bowness JM, Tarr AH. Increase in transglutaminase and its extracellular products in response to an inflammatory stimulus by lipopolysaccharide. Mol Cell Biochem 1997 Apr;169(1-2):157-63.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/01/2010 - A clinical research team recently examined the increased expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha in celiac disease. The team included A. Vannay, E. Sziksz, A. Prókai, G. Veres, K. Molnár, D. Nagy Szakál, A. Onódy, I. R. Korponay-Szabó, A. Szabó, T. Tulassay, A. Arató, and B. Szebeni.
    They are affiliated with the First Department of Pediatrics at Semmelweis University, and with the Department of Gastroenterology-Nephrology of Heim Pal Children's Hospital, both in Budapest, Hungary. They are also involved with the Research Group for Pediatrics and Nephrology, a joint project between the two institutions.
    The team set out to follow-up on the hypothesis that hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) 1 signaling may play a key role in maintaining the barrier function of the intestinal epithelium in cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
    In their 2008 article, "The human side of hypoxia-inducible factor," which appeared in the British Journal of Haematology, Smith, Robbins and Ratcliffe define Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) as transcription factors that respond to changes in available oxygen in the cellular environment, specifically, to decreases in oxygen, or hypoxia.
    The team wanted to characterize the variation of HIF-1alpha and related genes in celiac disease, where the importance of the barrier function is well understood.
    To accomplish their goal, they gathered duodenal biopsy specimens from 16 children with untreated celiac disease, 9 children with treated celiac disease, and 10 control subjects.
    They assessed HIF-1alpha, trefoil factor 1 (TFF1), ecto-5-prime nucleotidase (CD73) and multi-drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) mRNA and HIF-1alpha protein expression by real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. They assessed localization of HIF-1alpha by immunofluorescent staining.
    The team observed increased HIF-1alpha and TFF1 mRNA and HIF-1alpha protein expression in the duodenal mucosa of children with untreated celiac disease compared to either the control subjects, or those with treated celiac disease (p<0.05).
    Children with untreated celiac disease showed HIF-1alpha staining in cytoplasmic and nuclear region of the villous enterocytes.
    Children with treated celiac disease showed increased mRNA expression of CD73 and MDR1 versus control subjects (p<0.01 and 0.05, respectively).
    The results of increased mucosal HIF-1alpha expression in children with celiac disease suggests influences from this signaling pathway in the pathological mechanisms of celiac disease.
    Source:

    Pediatr Res. 2010 May 5. PMID: 20453713

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/25/2014 - People with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) do not have celiac disease, but their symptoms improve when they are placed on gluten-free diets.
    A research team set out to study the specific effects of gluten after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates (fermentable, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols [FODMAPs]) in subjects believed to have NCGS. The study team included J.R. Biesiekierski of the Department of Gastroenterology, Eastern Health Clinical School, Monash University, Box Hill, Victoria, Australia, and colleagues S.L. Peters, E.D. Newnham, O. Rosella, J.G. Muir, and P.R. Gibson.
    They conducted a double-blind cross-over trial on 31 women and 6 men, aged 24-61, with NCGS and irritable bowel syndrome (based on Rome III criteria), but not celiac disease. Researchers randomly assigned participants to groups given a 2-week diet of reduced FODMAPs. Participants were then placed on high-gluten (16 g gluten/d), low-gluten (2 g gluten/d and 14 g whey protein/d), or control (16 g whey protein/d) diets for 1 week, followed by a washout period of at least 2 weeks.
    The team measured serum and fecal markers of intestinal inflammation/injury and immune activation, and indices of fatigue. Twenty-two participants were then given either gluten (16 g/d), whey (16 g/d), or control (no additional protein) diets for 3 days. The team evaluated symptoms using visual analogue scales.
    Every patient experienced significant improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms during reduced FODMAP intake. Conversely, every patient experienced significantly worse symptoms when their diets included gluten or whey protein. The team observed gluten-specific effects in just 8% of participants. They saw no diet-specific changes in any biomarker.
    During the 3-day re-challenge, participants' symptoms increased by similar levels among groups. Gluten-specific gastrointestinal effects were not reproduced.
    The end result for this placebo-controlled, cross-over re-challenge study showed no evidence of specific or dose-dependent effects of gluten in patients with NCGS placed on diets low in FODMAPs. The translation is that the team saw no effects of gluten in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates.
    Source:
    Gastroenterology. 2013 Aug;145(2):320-8.e1-3. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2013.04.051. Epub 2013 May 4.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/03/2014 - Celiac disease patients in Australia have shown a major improvement in gluten tolerance after receiving experimental hookworm treatments. The study is part of an effort to determine if parasitic helminths, such as hookworm, might help to treat inflammatory disorders, including celiac disease.
    In this case, the research team assessed the influence of experimental hookworm infection on the predicted outcomes of three escalating gluten challenges in volunteers with confirmed celiac disease.
    The research team included John Croese, MD, Paul Giacomin, PhD, Severine Navarro, PhD, Andrew Clouston, MD, Leisa McCann, RN, Annette Dougall, PhD, Ivana Ferreira, BSc, Atik Susianto, MD, Peter O'Rourke, PhD, Mariko Howlett, MD, James McCarthy, MD, Christian Engwerda, PhD, Dianne Jones, BHSc, and Alex Loukas, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, the Center for Biodiscovery and Molecular Development of Therapeutics at the Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine of James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, Envoi Specialist Pathologists in Brisbane, Australia, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Brisbane, Australia, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, and with Logan Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
    This particular study followed twelve adult volunteers with diet-managed celiac disease. The volunteers were inoculated with 20 Necator americanus (hookworm) larvae, and then consumed increasing amounts of gluten in the form of spaghetti.
    The volunteers first received 10 to 50 milligrams for 12 weeks (microchallenge); they then received 25 milligrams daily + 1 gram twice weekly for 12 weeks (GC-1g); and finally 3 grams daily (60-75 straws of spaghetti) for 2 weeks (GC-3g).
    The subjects were then evaluated for symptomatic, serologic, and histological outcomes of gluten toxicity. They were also examined for regulatory and inflammatory T cell populations in blood and mucosa. Two gluten-intolerant subjects withdrew after micro-challenge. Ten completed GC-1g, and eight of these ten volunteers enrolled in and completed the full course of the study.
    Most celiacs who are exposed to gluten challenge will show adverse changes in the intestinal villi, which is measured in terms of villous height-to-crypt depth ratios. Also, such patients will usually show an increase in blood antibodies, such as IgA-tissue transglutaminase, indiucating an adverse reaction to gluten. However, the results here showed that median villous height-to-crypt depth ratios (2.60-2.63; P = .98) did not decrease as predicted after GC-1g. Moreover, mean IgA-tissue transglutaminase titers declined, contrary to the predicted rise after GC-3g.
    Other results showed that quality of life scores improved (46.3-40.6; P = .05); while celiac symptom indices (24.3-24.3; P = .53), intra-epithelial lymphocyte percentages (32.5-35.0; P = .47), and Marsh scores remained unchanged by gluten challenge.
    Intestinal T cells expressing IFNγ were reduced following hookworm infection (23.9%-11.5%; P = .04), with corresponding increases in CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (0.19%-1.12%; P = .001).
    Hookworms in the form of Necator americanus promoted tolerance and stabilized, or improved, all tested measures of gluten toxicity in volunteers with celiac disease. So, after being voluntarily infected with 20 hookworms, these celiac disease volunteers were able to eat increasingly large amounts of gluten with none of the usual changes or adverse symptoms.
    Could hookworm treatments represent the future of treatment for celiac disease, and maybe other inflammatory conditions? Clearly, further tests are needed to determine exactly how safe it is for celiac patients receiving this treatment to eat gluten. So far, however, the future looks bright.
    What do you think? If swallowing a small dose of hookworms would eliminate your adverse reactions, and allow you to safely eat gluten, would you do it?
    The radio program Radiolab has an interesting segment on hookworm, which you can stream here: Radiolab
    Source:
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2014.07.022

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back.
    Just a few years ago, Dickson dominated her peers nationally and won a gold medal at Canada Games for both pursuit and team relay. She also won silver in the sprint and bronze in the individual race. But just as she was set to reach her peak, Dickson found herself in an agonizing battle. She was suffering a mysterious loss of strength and endurance, which itself caused huge anxiety for Dickson. As a result of these physical and mental pressures, Dickson slipped from her perch as one of Canada's most promising young biathletes.
    Eventually, in September 2016, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Before the diagnosis, Dickson said, she had “a lot of fatigue, I just felt tired in training all the time and I wasn't responding to my training and I wasn't recovering well and I had a few things going on, but nothing that pointed to celiac.”
    It took a little over a year for Dickson to eliminate gluten, and begin to heal her body. She still hasn’t fully recovered, which makes competing more of a challenge, but, she says improving steadily, and expects to be fully recovered in the next few months. Dickson’s diagnosis was prompted when her older sister Kate tested positive for celiac, which carries a hereditary component. "Once we figured out it was celiac and we looked at all the symptoms it all made sense,” said Dickson.
    Dickson’s own positive test proved to be both a revelation and a catalyst for her own goals as an athlete. Armed with there new diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and a body that is steadily healing, Dickson is looking to reap the benefits of improved strength, recovery and endurance to ramp up her training and competition results.
    Keep your eyes open for the 20-year-old native of Burns Lake, British Columbia. Next season, she will be competing internationally, making a big jump to the senior ranks, and hopefully a regular next on the IBU Cup tour.
    Read more at princegeorgecitizen.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/25/2018 - A team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. The research could be helpful for treating type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease.
    In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells and tissues. Autoimmune disease affects nearly 24 million people in the United States. 
    In their study, a team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. They found that E. gallinarum triggered an autoimmune response in the mice when it traveled beyond the gut.
    They also found that the response can be countered by using antibiotics or vaccines to suppress the autoimmune reaction and prevent the bacterium from growing. The researchers were able to duplicate this mechanism using cultured human liver cells, and they also found the bacteria E. gallinarum in the livers of people with autoimmune disease.
    The team found that administering an antibiotic or vaccine to target E. gallinarum suppressed the autoimmune reaction in the mice and prevented the bacterium from growing. "When we blocked the pathway leading to inflammation," says senior study author Martin Kriegel, "we could reverse the effect of this bug on autoimmunity."
    Team research team plans to further investigate the biological mechanisms that are associated with E. gallinarum, along with the potential implications for systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease.
    This study indicates that gut bacteria may be the key to treating chronic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease. Numerous autoimmune conditions have been linked to gut bacteria.
    Read the full study in Science.

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.