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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Could Carnivorous Plant Enzymes Act Like Beano for Gluten?

    Caption: Image: CC--Swallowtail Garden Seeds

    Celiac.com 10/05/2016 - So, you're one of the millions of people with celiac disease, one of those folks who has to avoid gluten and eat a gluten-free diet. Maybe you'd like to be able to safely eat out. Maybe you'd like to safely eat some bread.

    Imagine a day a few years from now when you take a pill containing enzymes from a carnivorous plant, which allows your gut to fully break down gluten. You take the pill and sit down to that pizza and beer you've been missing for so long. Is such a day really somewhere in the near future? U of C researcher David Schriemer thinks so.

    "The idea here is that you would take it like Beano," Schreimer said. The enzymes are the product of diligent and meticulous collection by a team of dedicated scientists. They are responsible for carefully extracting the minute amount of digestive liquid in the bottom of each plant within an array of over 1,000 pitcher plants. Each pitcher plant holds just 0.5 millilitres of liquid.

    To collect enough for their study, Schreimer and his colleagues enlisted the help of three retired women in B.C.'s Lower Mainland who "had a fascination" for carnivorous sundews, Venus flytraps and pitcher plants. These women dedicated an entire greenhouse of roughly 1,000 individual pitchers, each about the size of a thumb, Schreimer said.

    The University of Calgary researchers supplied those women with vials of fruit flies to stimulate the plants, and the women tapped off small amounts of fluids on a regular basis. After six months, they had collected six litres, enough for the researchers to complete their studies.

    So, can the enzyme deliver? "We've taken it all the way through to animal trials at this point, and it seems to work," says Schreimer. The next step is trials on humans, followed by commercial development.

    Stay tuned for these and other results on the development of new drugs and treatment options for celiac disease.

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    OMG -- that would be GREAT! I don't miss bread, etc., but I hate having to miss out on delicious food because I'm afraid of trace amounts of gluten from cross-contamination.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/10/2015 - Of course, a strict gluten free diet is still the only safe and effective treatment for celiac disease. However, new drugs in development, some of which are currently being tested on humans, might allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten again, at least in small amounts.
    To be fair, even if all goes smoothly, it will be a few years at least before we see such treatments on the market. Moreover, even though many early results have been encouraging, none have yet entered safety trials, the final step before Food and Drug Administration approval and commercial availability.
    Drugs currently under trial include an enzyme that splits the protein in wheat that triggers adverse reactions, into smaller harmless products, and another which promises to make the gut less leaky, and thus block potentially toxic substances from triggering inflammation.
    There are several other drugs in earlier stages of development aimed at suppressing the immune response to gluten and preventing intestinal inflammation:
    ALV003, which will protect people with celiac disease against gut damage from small amounts of gluten. BL-7010 is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. ImmusanT’s therapeutic vaccine Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Larazotide acetate (AT-1001) is Alba Therapeutics Corporation’s investigational product, a first-in-class tight junction regulator, intended for the treatment of patients with celiac disease. AVX176, from Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug that is the subject of U.S. composition of matter patent 8,071,101, “Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance.” The patent, which expires on May 27 2029, provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia’s proprietary platform technology [32]. ActoGenX is carrying out discovery research in celiac disease with its range of ActoBiotics™, which use Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Chemocentryx’s CCR9, is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease. It has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. Meanwhile, in Europe, Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process.
    Some of these drugs may be taken right before eating gluten, while others might be more effective when taken on a regular schedule. If approved for use as intended, these drugs will likely allow people with celiac disease to eat gluten in small amounts. To my knowledge, there is no drug in current trial phases that is designed to permit unrestricted gluten consumption.
    So, the good news is that the next few years may see commercially available treatments that might actual help people manage celiac disease. The downside for people with celiac disease, at least for now, is that there is no treatment on the horizon that will allow safe, unlimited gluten-consumption. Moreover, there is no hint that a cure is coming anytime soon.
    Still, it’s good to know that researchers are working on providing helpful tools for treating celiac disease.
    Are you looking forward to seeing new treatment options for celiac disease? What kind of benefits should such treatments offer?
    Source:
    Gastroenterology Report

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/04/2016 - BL-7010, a non-absorbable, orally available co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, has received designation as Class IIb medical device in the European Union, according to manufacturer BioLineRx Ltd.
    This designation clears path for BioLine’s BL-7010 program, and allows the company to plan the next steps in the development of a commercial version of BL-7010.
    BL-7010 shows a high affinity for gliadins, the proteins in gluten that trigger celiac disease. BL-710 works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic breakdown, and blocks the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger the adverse immune reactions in people with celiac disease. This results in a significantly reduced immune response triggered by gluten. Together with the gluten, BL-7010 passes harmlessly through the digestive tract and is not absorbed into the blood.
    The safety and efficacy of BL-7010 have been demonstrated in a number of pre-clinical studies, including a Phase 1/2 study completed in November 2014.
    In prepared comments, BioLineRX CEO Kinneret Savitsky, Ph.D., said that the company is "excited to receive confirmation for the medical device designation pathway in Europe for our BL-7010 program," and is now planning the next steps in the development of this product, including the next clinical efficacy study which we expect to commence in mid-2016."
    The company also continues to "evaluate the potential of BL-7010 as a food supplement," said Dr. Savitsky.
    Read more at: PRNewswire.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/25/2016 - Celiac disease is one of the most common immune-mediated diseases. Often, a gluten-free diet does not fully control celiac symptoms and disease activity.
    Even though no new therapies have been approved, a growing effort, coupled with a rapidly expanding knowledge of the regulatory pathway could soon lead to new breakthroughs.
    A team of researchers recently reviewed the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and current treatment paradigm for celiac disease. The researchers were M Wungjiranirun, CP Kelly, and DA Leffler, both of the Division of Gastroenterology at the Celiac Center of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
    They also reviewed the major types of therapies being proposed for celiac treatment, and expounded broadly upon what is known, and what can be predicted concerning the regulatory pathway for approval of a new celiac disease treatment. In the near future, increasingly numerous and diverse therapy options will enter clinical trials. The desired result will be the first approved agents targeting celiac disease treatment outside of a gluten-free diet.
    The team notes that, though things like biopsies and blood tests will always be important in therapeutic clinical trials, there is not currently enough evidence to link them with improved patient outcomes, which is required as a baseline for drug approval. This means that patient-reported outcomes will likely be primary end points in Phase III celiac disease trials for some time to come.
    Source:
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2016 Jun;111(6):779-86. doi: 10.1038/ajg.2016.105. Epub 2016 Mar 29.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/19/2016 - The world's first vaccine aimed at curing celiac disease is slated to begin full trials later this year, and residents of the Australian state of Victoria will be among the first humans to give it a try against celiac disease.
    The vaccine, called Nexvax2, was developed by Australian scientist Dr Bob Anderson, and is aimed at giving celiac patients a chance to overcome their immune reaction to the gluten found in products containing wheat, rye and barley. Nexvax2 aims to de-sensitise patients to three peptides contained in gluten that trigger a damaging reaction in their immune system.
    Previous trials on 150 patients from Melbourne, Perth, Adelaide, Brisbane and Auckland were aimed at finding a safe dosage rather than assessing its ability to beat celiac disease. Results from those favorable earlier trials were released in May, and Dr Anderson says that the larger phase II study, also being undertaken in the US and Europe, will assess how well the vaccine works against celiac disease.
    Dr Anderson first identified the peptides triggering coeliac disease and began developing the vaccine while working at Melbourne's Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, before travelling to Boston for six weeks as part of a sister city arrangement through the City of Melbourne, where he made contact with ImmusanT to further the discovery.
    This is certainly exciting news for people with celiac disease, many of whom may benefit from such treatment.
    Stay tuned for news on the progress of these trials.
    Source:
    dailysecrets.press

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    So i recently had a baby and 3 months postpartum I started celery juicing and after juicing my stomach would be in so much pain. So I stopped it for a while and a whole month no pain or issues. I made an apt with a GI doctor to just get my blood work checked everything came back great except the Ema it was 1:20 he said it was strange because all the other Celiac panel test were negative my Ttg and the genetic screening even. So I made an apt with another doctor for second opinion she stated
    I am celiac and eat gluten-free, DF, SF and sunflower free because I'm highly reactive to all 4. I discovered about a year and a half ago that I would have severe and immediate GI reactions, similar to as if I ate dairy, to anything with sunflower/safflower products in it, but I think that's when using the oil became more prevalent too. Strange because I loved sunflower seeds as a kid. I've also linked it to places I've eaten out where everything was fine and then discovered they started using s
    So i recently had a baby and 3 months postpartum I started celery juicing and after juicing my stomach would be in so much pain. So I stopped it for a while and a whole month no pain or issues. I made an apt with a GI doctor to just get my blood work checked everything came back great except the Ema it was 1:20 he said it was strange because all the other Celiac panel test were negative my Ttg and the genetic screening even. So I made an apt with another doctor for second opinion she stated that
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