• Welcome to Celiac.com

  • Member Statistics

    84,304
    Total Members
    4,125
    Most Online
    Mainah
    Newest Member
    Mainah
    Joined
  • 1 1

    Could Drinking Baking Soda Fight Celiac and Other Autoimmune Diseases?


    Jefferson Adams
    • A daily dose of baking soda may help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, according to scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

    Could Drinking Baking Soda Fight Celiac and Other Autoimmune Diseases?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Michael

    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.

    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.

    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.

    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.

    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.

    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."

    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."

    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    1 1


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    This is good research.

    They may have found the triggering mechanism for what set's off an auto-immune reaction to food allergens (proteins) like gluten and lactose etc.

    Here is the medical news today article on it because I think they summarize it well.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321624.php

    These microvilli are like a smoke detector for the body to signal/mount an immune response and when this response is turned on by gluten accidently/mistakenly then the body attacks our Villi thinking it is fighting off a virus instead.

    Also a similar article came out today about Alzheimers might be triggered by the herpes virus.

    https://www.livescience.com/62883-herpes-viruses-alzheimers.html

    The same way EBV has shown a possible link to celiac disease.

    which makes perfect sense in light of this new research about our microvilli's mistakingly identifying gluten as a virus thus setting off our auto-immune response.

    Posterboy,

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Harold

    Posted

    It's interesting, however, most doctors advise against long term consumption of antacids for people with conditions like GERD. I wonder what they would suggest to those who were suffering from both acid reflux and inflammatory diseases.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/21/2012 - Over the past several years, researchers have made substantial progress in understanding the causes of autism, which now afflicts about 1 in 88 children. However, very little news of this progress seems to have spread into popular consciousness, much of which continues to focus on the possible role of vaccines.
    Recent discoveries indicates that one-third or more cases of autism look to be a kind of inflammatory disease, which begins well before birth.
    In the August 25th issue of the New York Times, Moises Velasquez-Manhoff has very interesting article in which he discusses the widening view among researchers that autism is, in fact, an inflammatory disease. The article is long and comprehensive, and cites numerous studies, findings and experiments.
    Inflammation is the body's natural response to certain kinds of threats. In a normal body, the immune system uses inflammation in a very precise, targeted way, before returning to a normal state.
    In autistic individuals, inflammatory signals become the dominant condition, and there is no balancing anti-inflammatory response. A state of chronic inflammation becomes normal. And the more skewed toward inflammation, the more acute the autistic symptoms.
    This inflammatory deregulation adversely impacts the brains of autistic individuals. Velasquez-Manhoff also cites a number of studies that trace these inflammatory effects back to the inflammatory responses of the mother during pregnancy.
    Among the studies cited in the article is a population-wide study from Denmark spanning two decades of births, which indicates that infection during pregnancy increases the risk of autism in the child. The study found that hospitalization for a viral infection, like the flu, during the first trimester of pregnancy triples the odds of autism. Bacterial infection, including of the urinary tract, during the second trimester increases chances by 40 percent.
    Another large Danish study, which included nearly 700,000 births over a decade, found that a mother’s rheumatoid arthritis, a degenerative disease of the joints, elevated a child’s risk of autism by 80 percent. Rates of autism in children of mothers with celiac disease were 350 percent higher than normal. Genetic studies had similar findings. Variations in genes associated with regulating the immune system also increase the risk of autism, especially when they occur in the mother.
    A mother’s diagnosis of asthma or allergies during the second trimester of pregnancy increases her child’s risk of autism. So does metabolic syndrome, a disorder associated with insulin resistance, obesity and, crucially, low-grade inflammation.
    Yet, viral and bacterials infections themselves do not seem the cause of the autism epidemic. The epidemiology doesn’t support that conclusion.
    A far more likely culprit is maternal immune dysregulation. Basically, the mother’s attempt to repel invaders, her inflammatory response, seems to be at fault. Research by Paul Patterson, an expert in neuroimmunity at Caltech, supports this idea. In his research, he introduces inflammation in pregnant mice artificially, without a live infection. This causes behavioral problems in the young. In this model, autism results from collateral damage. It’s an unintended consequence of self-defense during pregnancy.
    Since infantile autism was first described by Leo Kanner in 1943, diagnoses have risen tenfold. During that same period, viral and bacterial infections generally declined. However, overall rates of inflammatory diseases have risen sharply since then.
    As a group, these diseases include asthma, now estimated to affect 1 in 10 children, rates that have at least doubled since 1980, along with autoimmune disorders, which now afflict 1 in 20.
    Recently, William Parker at Duke University has chimed in. Some years back, he began comparing wild sewer rats with clean lab rats. The bodies of wild rats tightly controlled inflammation, but those of the lab rats did not. Parker found that the bodies of the wild rats contained high levels of parasites. Parasites are noted for limiting inflammation.
    One lesson from these rodent experiments is that fixing the maternal dysregulation will most likely prevent autism. That theory is supported by Swiss researchers, who created a lineage of mice with a genetically reinforced anti-inflammatory signal. They then inflamed the pregnant mice. The babies emerged fine, with no behavioral problems. This suggests that if inflammation is controlled during pregnancy, it won’t interfere with fetal brain development.
    Interestingly, asthma researchers are coming to similar conclusions: preventing inflammation in pregnant women will likely prevent asthma.
    Dr. Parker has introduced a more aggressive approach. He suggests that by using specially developed worms to restore “domesticated” parasites doctors can correct immune dysregulation.
    To determine if this is feasible, a trial is under way at the Montefiore Medical Center and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The trial is using a medicalized parasite called Trichuris suis, known as a whipworm, to treat autistic adults.
    The whipworm is native to pigs, and was first used medically to treat inflammatory bowel disease. It has shown anecdotal benefit in autistic children.
    The article suggests that the future of treating immune dysregulation, and thus preventing diseases like autism and asthma, may lie in reintroducing parasites into the human body. Stay tuned for more updates on this truly fascinating science.
    Read the full article by Moises Velasquez-Manhoff in the New York Times.

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 08/29/2016 - In 2005 the National Institute of Health indicated more than 23 million Americans suffered from autoimmune disease. Today the projection is 30 million who experience extreme fatigue, muscle and joint pain, muscle weakness, sleeplessness, weight loss or gain, and memory problems as symptoms of autoimmune disorders.
    Celiac disease has gotten the most attention in antibody research, but the current data on cross-reactivity of antibodies is allowing a better understanding of gluten sensitivity. Antigen reactivity to alpha-gliadin can trigger immune attacks on many individuals beyond those with positive DQ 2, DQ 8 and TTG test results.
    Gluten ataxia has been identified not only in people with celiac disease, but also in autism, lupus and multiple sclerosis. The lack of muscle control for movement, speech, eye coordination and swallowing can now be assessed in most autoimmune disorders.
    Gliadin reacts with foods and human tissue antigens causing symptoms beyond the gastro-intestinal tract. A low inflammatory diet customized to each person through testing for cross-reactivity or elimination diet protocols is needed to restore a state of health and well-being (for a copy of Low Inflammatory Diet & Elimination Diets check the author's website at the end of this article).
    According to Aristo Vojdani, PhD, professor of neuroimmunology at Carrick Institute and Chief Science Advisor for Cyrex Labs, about 50 percent gluten-sensitive individuals are also sensitive to dairy proteins (cow's milk, casein, whey) and sensitivity to oats depends on the variety of the grain and not just contamination from the milling process.
    In the author's personal experience, a gluten-free diet has many limitations. The reactivity between alpha gliadin and corn, millet, oats, rice and dairy has been denounced as invalid by gastroenterologists and celiac disease researchers. While at a medical school in Missouri, biopsies did not show improvement in villous atropy until all alpha gliadin sources and corn, millet, rice and oats were removed from the diet.
    Intestinal permeability or leaky gut allows antigens into the blood stream including food proteins, pathogens, and toxic chemicals which can cause inflammation. Continuous antigen exposure to tissues and organs is a factor in developing autoimmune disorders. Symptoms develop silently in the gut, joints and endocrine glands for several years. Tissue destruction with T and B lymphocyte reactions are a warning that autoimmune issues are developing during the next 5 to 10 year period until immunosuppressive drugs like corticosteroids are needed.
    To reduce the triggers to autoimmune diseases early, nutrition and lifestyle habits need adjusting.
    A Gluten-free Diet may seem easier today than 10 years ago, but current regulations in many countries allow up to 20 ppm gluten to be labeled "gluten-free". Many gliadin and cross -reactive proteins are most likely still available to create inflammatory symptoms.
    Assessing Viral Activity is key to managing autoimmune disease symptoms. Viral panels for EBV, Lyme, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, CMV are available. Nutrition management of viral load is critical for the person with celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases.
    Reducing Toxic Chemicals is just as important as omitting gluten. Plastics like bisphenol A, heavy metals, pesticide residues, solvents all create inflammation. Water filtration devices that remove fluoride, heavy metals and pathogens plus stainless steel water bottles could reduce the body burden of chemicals that influence digestive function, joint movement, and immune well-being.

    Jefferson Adams
    High Smad7 Sustains Inflammatory Cytokine Response in Refractory Celiac Disease
    Celiac.com 12/07/2016 - Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is a form of celiac disease that does not respond to treatment with gluten-free diet, and often involves greater risk of complications.
    The guts of many RCD patients over-produce effector cytokines, which are supposed to amplify the tissue-destructive immune response. However, it remains unclear if the RCD-associated mucosal inflammation is sustained by defects in counter-regulatory mechanisms.
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether RCD-related inflammation is marked by high Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 activity. The research team included S Sedda, V De Simone, I Marafini, G Bevivino, R Izzo, OA Paoluzi, A Colantoni, A Ortenzi, P Giuffrida, GR Corazza, A Vanoli, A Di Sabatino, F Pallone, and G Monteleone. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Systems Medicine at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata," the First Department of Internal Medicine at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of the University of Pavia, and with the Department of Molecular Medicine at San Matteo Hospital at the University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy.
    The team evaluated Smad7 in duodenal biopsy samples of patients with RCD, patients with active celiac, patients with inactive celiac disease and healthy controls by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. In the same samples, they used ELISA and immunohistochemistry to assess TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3, respectively.
    They evaluated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in RCD samples cultured with Smad7 sense or antisense oligonucleotide. Smad7 protein, but not RNA, expression was increased in RCD, as compared to active and inactive celiac patients and healthy controls. This increased expression was associated with defective TGF-β1 signaling, as marked by diminished p-Smad2/3 expression. TGF-β1 protein content did not differ among groups. Knockdown of Smad7 in RCD biopsy samples reduced IL-6 and TNFα expression.
    These results show that, in RCD, high Smad7 associates with defective TGF-β1 signaling, and sustains inflammatory cytokine production.
    These results suggest a novel mechanism by which amplifies mucosal cytokine response in RCD, and suggest that treatments targeting Smad7 might be helpful in RCD.
    Source:
    Immunology. 2016 Nov 14. doi: 10.1111/imm.12690.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac Disease Linked to Nearly Every Inflammatory Disorder
    Celiac.com 12/05/2017 - It's not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have other medical conditions, including liver disease, glossitis, pancreatitis, Down syndrome, and autism.
    By the same token, people with one or more of these associated disorders can be at greater risk for having or developing celiac disease. Until recently, though researchers didn't have much good data on the numbers behind those risk levels. A new database study of more than 35 million people changes that.
    The study found that, for example, people with autism have celiac disease at rates that are 20 times higher than those without autism. You read that right. People with autism are 20 times more likely to have celiac disease than people from the general population.
    Reporting on his team's findings at the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017, lead investigator Daniel Karb, MD, a second-year resident at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, says that doctors who treat autistic patients may want to keep an eye out for celiac-like symptoms. "If you have a patient who is autistic and they have all these unusual symptoms, you might want to screen them for celiac disease," said Karb.
    Researchers have long known that people with celiac disease can present with unusual symptoms that fall outside the classic celiac symptoms of malabsorption, steatorrhea, malnutrition, abdominal pain, and cramping after eating, "but this is putting numbers to it," said Dr Karb.
    For their study, Dr. Karb and his colleagues searched the Explorys database, which aggregates electronic health record data from 26 major integrated healthcare systems in the United States. Combing through the records of 35,854,260 people in the database from 2012 to 2017, they found 83,090 celiac disease diagnoses.
    The investigators uncovered significant connections between celiac disease and 13 other autoimmune disorders, such as type 1 diabetes, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. In fact, the team found that, except for a condition called primary biliary cholangitis, "[e]very autoimmune disease [they] looked at is associated with celiac disease," Dr. Karb reported.
    The study indicates that "there is a large undiagnosed burden of celiac disease," he explained. "And a lot of it is probably because of these atypical presentations."
    As research continues, look for more connections between celiac disease and other inflammatory conditions to be more fully detailed.
    For more on the World Congress of Gastroenterology 2017.
    Source:
    Medscape.com