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    EEG Research Findings in Children with Celiac Disease According to Dietary Variations - Germany


    Scott Adams


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    Paul V, Henkerr J, Todt H, Eysold R.
    Z.Klin.Med., 1985; 40: 707-709.

    In this study 90 EEGs were performed on 58 celiac children. Researchers concluded that abnormal brain waves resulted from the ingestion of gluten by celiac children. They also concluded that a gluten challenge should not be given before a child reaches the age of 6 years old, and the challenge should not last longer than 5 months. The researchers main concern seems to be the risk of permanent brain damage that they believe could be caused in a celiac child who eats gluten for a prolonged period of time.

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    The study is available electronically here:

     

    http://www.npif.no/pdfs/eeg-befunde-zoliakie.pdf

     

     

    They also did a follow up study on some of these children:

     

    Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition:Volume 25 Supplement 11997p 43

    LONG-TERM EEG-EXAMINATIONS IN CHILDREN WITH COELIAC DISEASE

    [Gut Interactions with Brain and Environment in Children; First International Symposium on Pediatric Neurogastroenterology Capri, Italy, September 18-20, 1997]

    Henker, J.; Paul, K.-D.; Todt, H.

     

    Dept. of Pediat., Medical Faculty of Technical University, Dresden, Germany

     

     

     

    Neurological manifestations in coeliac disease (celiac disease) have been known for a long time. In generally they are the consequence of malabsorption.

     

    In a previous study we could show by using EEG-examinations, that a gluten-containing diet in children with celiac disease can lead to cerebral alterations (1).

     

    Long-term EEG-investigations have been carried out in 19 of these patients (up to 7.8 year). We found, despite re-introduc tion of a strict glutenfree diet and normalization of small intestinal architecture the EEG disturbances can persist. We assume, there is primarily in the floride phase of disease a functional-metabolic disturbance followed by morphologic changes. Gluten challenge tests to confirm the diagnosis, if necessary, should therefore not be performed until the age of 6, that is after the completion of cell differentiation in the brain and last as short as possible. [Context Link]

     

     

     

    Reference

    1. Paul K-D, Henker J, Todt H, Eysold R: EEG-Befunde bei zöliakiekranken Kindern in Abhängigkeit von der Ernährung Z Klin Med 1985; 40:707-709

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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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