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    First-Ever Mouse Model Studies at University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center


    Jefferson Adams

    For the first time, researchers at the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center will use mouse model research to explore root causes of celiac disease, test new therapies, and explore new targets for treatment.


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    Celiac disease is the most common genetic autoimmune disease in the world. Celiac disease affects approximately three million Americans, but only three out of every one hundred people with celiac disease have been diagnosed.

    At least ninety-seven percent of people with celiac disease undiagnosed. Untreated celiac disease can lead to osteoporosis, infertility, neurological conditions, and cancer. Moreover, people with celiac disease have a substantially higher risk of developing other autoimmune diseases, especially Type-1 diabetes.

    Bana Jabri, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, University of Chicago Medical Center, and a leading celiac disease researcher, will create the new mouse model with the goal of identifying new remedies and preventive treatments targeted at children of families with a history of celiac disease. The studies will also investigate events that contribute to the development of Type-1 diabetes.

    “There is a critical need to provide the proper resources to those who suffer from celiac disease,” said Stefano Guandalini, M.D., professor of pediatrics at the University of Chicago Medical Center, founder and medical director of the Celiac Disease Center. “This commitment from University of Chicago Celiac Advisory Board reaffirms the Celiac Disease Center’s mission to bring cutting edge research, education and encouragement to those affected by the disease”.

    Dr. Jabri believes that mouse models are central to understanding the underlying causes of celiac disease, its connection to other autoimmune diseases.

    The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center is a 501-c3 non-profit organization, completely funded by donor contributions, and committed to improving the care, diagnosis and awareness of celiac disease. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center also provides necessary infrastructure and support for cutting-edge celiac research, including investigations into structure of gluten peptides and the mechanisms by which gluten modifies self molecules.

    Mouse model studies show promise in helping researchers to better and more quickly unlock the secrets of celiac disease.


    For more information please visit: www.celiacdisease.net 

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/16/2010 - A team of German clinicians recently noted a case that indicates that tumors may influence immunologic reactions. The team included F. Mühr-Wilkenshoffa, M. Friedricha, H.-D. Fossb, M. Hummelb, M. Zeitza, and S. Dauma. They are associated with the Medical Clinic I, Gastroenterology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, and with the Department of Pathology, Charité  at University Medicine Berlin.
    They recently reported on the case of a 72-year-old patient who suffered from celiac disease that had been diagnosed in his early fifties. The patient had not followed a gluten-free diet. Rather, he had eaten a normal diet. However, he showed no evidence of enteropathy or celiac-associated antibodies. Still, the patient developed a jejunal T-cell lymphoma.
    Due to perforation, the team performed a resection, and added four courses of IMVP-16. The patient switched to a strict gluten-free diet. After two years, he presented with weight loss and a clonally divergent refractory sprue type II with loss of antigen (CD8; T-cell receptor-β) expression in intraepithelial lymphocytes.
    At that point, even though he remained on a strict gluten-free diet, he showed elevated blood levels of celiac-associated antibodies.
    The team notes several interesting facets to the case. First, the lack of enteropathy under a gluten-containing diet supports the notion that malignant diseases, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, trigger immune suppression.
    Secondly, the fact that, while still on a strict gluten-free diet, the patient developed an early form of a second independent T-cell lymphoma (refractory sprue type II), coupled with the celiac-associated antibodies, raises the question whether the clonal intraepithelial lymphocytes might be stimulating antibody production.
    Thus, taken alone, the detection of celiac-associated antibodies in patients with celiac disease is not sufficient to prove noncompliance with gluten-free diet.
    Source: Digestion 2010;81:231-234 (DOI: 10.1159/000269810)



    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 07/08/2010 - Acute abdominal pain is the most common symptom leading to emergency surgery; accounting for up to 50% of emergency surgical admissions and nonspecific abdominal pain (NSAP) likely accounts for 40% of the cases. While abdominal pain can often be a symptom of celiac disease, up until this point there have been no official studies to determine the  the association of celiac disease and abdominal pain.
    A group of researchers in the UK attempted to uncover the connection between celiac disease and abdominal pain. Using a case-controlled study of 300 consecutive, new, and unselected patients exhibiting acute abdominal pain, and a healthy control group not presenting any abdominal pain, were matched by age and gender and then assessed accordingly.
    Initially, the research team under Dr. David S. Sanders of the Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK,  used immunoglobulins, IgA/IgG anti-gliadin (ADA), and endomysial antibodies (EMA) to evaluate the test subjects for celiac disease. Any of the test subjects that tested with a positive IgA,  AGA, EMA or IgG AGA accompanied by IgA deficiency was provided with the opportunity to receive a small bowel biopsy to confirm a celiac diagnosis; only 1 person declined.
    Among the acute abdominal pain demographic, the median age range was 57 years old and exactly half of the 300 participants were female. All test patients were given an initial biochemical, hematologic, and immunologic profile. Of the patients tested, 33 with abdominal pain had either a positive IgA gliadin antibody, EMA or a combination of both. Of those 33 patients, 9 had histologically proven celiac disease.  Among the healthy control group, 2 people were discovered to have celiac disease.
    Researchers matched case controls and then determined the antibody status of the control group and the abdominal pain group. While there were no corresponding  pairs, the statistical chance of having celiac disease when demonstrating acute abdominal pain has an odds ratio of 4.6. Although when NSAP was solely taken into consideration, the prevalence of celiac disease exhibited profound significance with a rate of 10.5%. 
    Of the test subjects that maintained the gluten-free diet for the recommended time period of 12 -18 months, all of them exhibited an improvement of their symptoms, and their antibody profiles were negative. 
    From this study, researchers concluded that targeting patients with NSAP or those that exhibit  other high risk celiac symptoms, will likely improve  the diagnostic yield of celiac disease, specifically among those exhibiting  typical celiac symptoms. Additionally, the ideal situation would be if more doctors were to recognize NSAP symptoms as  having the potential to be connected with celiac disease and screen for celiac accordingly; as delayed or undiagnosed celiac disease can eventually lead to a myriad of other long-term and permanent health issues including, osteoporosis, infertility, and an increased risk of cancer.
    Source:

    Ann Surg. 2005 Aug;242(2):201-7.

    Diana Gitig Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 07/18/2011 - People with celiac disease are relatively lucky; a simple change in diet, without any drugs, can completely reverse all symptoms in most patients and causes no side effects. But maintaining a gluten free diet is, of course, far from simple. A number of treatment options are in varying stages of development, but no one has asked celiac patients what kind of treatment they would prefer to a gluten free diet, or if they would even prefer one at all. A recent study in the UK did just that. It found that over 40% of celiac patients are dissatisfied with the gluten free diet.
    Aziz et al. gave a questionnaire to 310 celiac patients and 477 controls. The first section measured their satisfaction with the gluten free diet; the second measured their use of complementary or alternative medicine by asking if they took popular oral supplements (multivitamins, kava, Echinacea, etc.); and the third assessed their views of novel therapies being developed to treat celiac disease. These include a vaccine that would be injected and would allow the consumption of unlimited gluten; peptidases or zonulin antagonists that would enzymatically degrade gluten or inhibit intestinal permeability, respectively, and would be taken orally in case of accidental or periodic ingestion of gluten; and genetic modification of wheat to reduce its toxicity.
    Although more than 40% of celiac patients were unhappy with the gluten free diet, they did not use complementary or alternative medicines with more frequently than controls. This suggests that they do not view these as viable alternative treatments to a gluten free diet. Most celiac patients - 42% - said that they would be interested in a vaccine that would allow them to eat unlimited gluten, while 35% said they would prefer anti-zonulin and 23% said they would like peptidases. Both of these latter therapies would not necessarily allow for healing of the small bowel mucosa like a gluten free diet does, but either could be taken as an adjuvant or to protect against minor or occasional ingestion of gluten. Of the potential novel treatments, all patients ranked genetic modification of wheat as their lowest preference.
    Adherence to dietary advice is among the lowest of all kinds of guidance given by doctors. Among celiac, strict adherence to a gluten free diet varies from 96% all the way down to 36% among different populations. As these British researchers demonstrated and noted in their conclusions, "patients with coeliac [sic] disease are keen to consider novel therapies."
    Source:

    Aziz I, Evans KE, Papageorgiou V, Sanders DS. Are patients with coeliac disease seeking alternative therapies to a gluten-free diet? J Gastrointestin Liver Dis 2011; 20(1) 27-31.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/01/2013 - Potential celiac disease (PCD) is a type of celiac disease marked by positive endomysial/tissue transglutaminase antibodies and a preserved duodenal mucosa despite a gluten-containing diet (GCD). PCD can turn into active celiac disease, but very little is currently known about what causes that to happen.
    A team of researchers recently conducted a retroactive study to better understand PCD rates and the natural history of adult patients with PCD.
    The research team included F. Biagi, L. Trotta, C. Alfano, D. Balduzzi, V. Staffieri, P.I. Bianchi, A. Marchese, C. Vattiato, A. Zilli, O. Luinetti, P. Gobbi, and G.R. Corazza of the Celiac Centre/First Department of Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo and the University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy.
    For their study, the team assessed the clinical notes for all 47 patients with PCD attending our clinic between September 1999 and October 2011. They established a control group of patients with active celiac disease, randomly selected and matched for sex and date of birth.
    They then compared results for symptoms, associated diseases, familiarity, and laboratory data at diagnosis for the PCD group against results from the control group. They found that 42 of 187 celiac disease patients directly diagnosed at their center had PCD. That's 1 out of every 4.4 celiac patients, 18.3%, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) 13.3-23.4%.
    There was no difference between the two groups in terms of average age at diagnosis, laboratory data, prevalence of symptoms, associated diseases, and familiarity for celiac disease.
    Interestingly, some patients with PCD maintained a normal duodenal mucosa for many years and their symptoms spontaneously improved despite continuing to regularly consume gluten. Basically, this study indicates that potential celiac disease is not a rare and/or early form of celiac disease.
    Because of the consistency in age at diagnosis and clinical features between potential celiac disease and active celiac disease, they suggest that potential celiac disease is a separate condition that can only develop into active celiac disease, though it does not always do so.

    Source:
    Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 May;48(5):537-42. doi: 10.3109/00365521.2013.777470.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
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    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
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    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
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    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
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    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
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    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au