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  • Destiny Stone
    Destiny Stone

    Irish Study of Gluten-Free Foods

    Caption: Irish Study of Gluten-Free Breads

    Celiac.com 06/10/2010 - New research is currently underway in Ireland, as researchers test "pseudo-cereals" to determine the quality of  replacements for glutenous grains such as, wheat, rye and barley. Many celiacs, especially those with delayed diagnosis', suffer from malabsorbtion and malnutrition. It is therefore more important for celiacs to ingest grains that are vitamin fortified than it is for non-celiacs. Researchers at Teagasc Food Research Ashtown are attempting to address the nutritional concerns for gluten-free products. They are working to  formulate gluten-free bread products that are tasty, and have higher nutritional properties.

    Doctor Eimear Gallagher, of Teagasc Food Research Ashtown, is leading the current research project which primarily focuses on using “pseudo-cereals” such as amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat, to replace gluten containing grains,  also known as wheat, rye and barley. Dr. Gallagher suggests that the demand for new and improved gluten-free bread products is growing  rapidly due to greater public awareness of celiac disease, and the rise in positive celiac diagnoses'.

    Celiac affects approximately 1 percent of the population. Which means that 1 percent of the population must look for alternatives to favored grain products such as bread, pizza and cereals to name a few. While there is a large variety of gluten-free products on the market, many gluten-free products are described as being crumbly, brittle, bland and often rendered  inedible. Gluten-free products are not only considered inferior in texture and taste to their wheat counterparts, but they are also criticized for having inferior nutritional value. Most mainstream breads and grains are vitamin fortified and therefore contain many essential nutrients, vitamins, and fiber. However, most gluten-free grains are typically made with starches and refined flours such as rice, corn and potato starches, which are low in nutrients and are not usually fortified.

    Dr. Gallagher and researchers are studying characteristics of pseudo-cereals to replace wheat in grain products. Amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat are naturally high in nutritional values with high levels of protein and dietary fiber, which make them excellent grain alternatives  for celiacs. Dr. Gallagher's findings showed that all of the pseudo-cereal breads revealed a significant increase in antioxidant and polyphenol activity, compared to the gluten-free control group.

    Teagasc  food researchers are also working hard to create a dairy-based ingredient that can produce the same properties in bread as gluten does. So far researchers have discovered that casein aggregates and forms a protein network which can retain gas in gluten-free dough. The reactions are similar to gluten containing wheat dough, but this is a work in progress and more studies are needed.

    Dr. Gallagher's studies have revealed significant information on ingredients, formulations and technologies used to make gluten-free products, which will help provide edible and healthy alternatives to gluten-free products.

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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/19/2008 - In a development that could benefit people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, a team of researchers based in Spain and the U.K. has developed a faster, easier way to test food products for the protein that triggers the adverse reactions associated with celiac disease.
    Such a rapid gluten detection test for food products could help millions of people avoid the indigestion, diarrhea, bloating, and other symptoms that arise when they accidentally consume foods that contain gluten.
    The research team was made up of Alex Fragoso, Ciara O'Sullivan and other colleagues, and their results will appear in the December 15 issue of the journal Analytical Chemistry.
    Their development centers on the creation of a new sensor that detects antibodies to the protein gliadin, a component of the gluten found in wheat, rye, and barley. Laboratory tests showed that the new sensor is both highly accurate and far faster than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which is the current standard test for gliadin. The new test can detect gliadin in amounts as small as the parts per billion range, while an ELISA test requires a full 8 hours to do the same thing.
    Avoiding gluten enables people with celiac disease to avoid symptoms commonly associated with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. However, since gluten can hide in so many seemingly safe foods, such as soy sauce, canned soups, and licorice candy, it can be difficult to know for certain whether foods are in fact free of gluten free. A number of prepared foods clearly list gluten ingredients on their labels, but spotting its presence can be challenging at best, and is often outright hit or miss.
    A rapid, highly accurate test that can reliably spot gluten in food products promises to make it easier for manufacturers to label their products, and for people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance to avoid gluten and thereby enjoy better health.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/03/2010 - Celiac disease increases production of IL-17A by cells that also make IFN-gamma. Recently, a research team set out to characterize the expression of IL-17A-producing cells in celiac disease.
    The team included I. Monteleone, M. Sarra, G. Del Vecchio Blanco, O. A. Paoluzi, E. Franzè, D. Fina, A. Fabrizi, T. T. Macdonald, F. Pallone, and G. Monteleone of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Tor Vergata in Rome, Italy.
    Infiltration of the mucosa with IFN-gamma-secreting Th1 cells is one of the features associated with celiac disease. Recent studies have shown the pathogenic effects previously attributed to Th1 cells may in fact be caused by a novel subset of T cells, termed Th17 cells, and noted for expressing high levels of IL-17A.
    In this study, the team set out to characterize the expression of IL-17A-producing cells in celiac disease. Using real-time PCR and ELISA, the team showed that expression of IL-17A RNA and protein is greater in active celiac disease biopsy specimens than in specimens from inactive celiac disease, and normal mucosal biopsies.
    Through flow cytometry, the team confirmed that the mucosa of celiac disease patients overproduces IL-17A, and that the main sources for this overproduction were CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) cells.  Most IL-17A-producing CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) cells co-expressed IFN-gamma but did not co-express CD161.
    Including a peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin to ex-vivo organ cultures of duodenal biopsy specimens taken from patients with inactive celiac disease enhanced IL-17A production 
    by both CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) cells.
    Since the team showed earlier that patients with celiac disease overproduced IL-21, a T cell-derived cytokine involved in the control of Th17 cell responses, they next determined whether IL-21 was responsible for regulating IL-17A expression.
    Blocking IL-21 action with a neutralizing IL-21 Ab lowered total IL-17A expression in cultures of active celiac disease and peptic-tryptic digest of gliadin-treated celiac disease biopsy specimens.
    From the data, the team concludes that celiac disease increases IL-17A, which is produced by cells that also produce IFN-gamma.
    Source: Journal of Immunology, 2010 Jan 8.


    Gryphon Myers
    Celiac.com 07/16/2012 - Between 1984 and 1996, Sweden experienced a celiac disease epidemic: celiac disease rates shot up to four times normal levels, then dropped just as abruptly ten years later. This is interesting because it shows that there is some environmental cause for the disease, but the nature of that cause is proving hard to pinpoint.
    One proposed candidate for the cause of Sweden's celiac disease epidemic is early life vaccinations. Given that vaccinations modulate the developing immune system, they could feasibly lead to immune-related diseases (like celiac disease ,whereby the immune reaction toward gluten proteins is changed).
    To test whether changes in Sweden's vaccination programs were responsible for the celiac disease epidemic, data pertaining to such vaccination program changes were gathered from the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care and the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease control. These data were plotted on a graph spanning 1973 to 2003 and compared against data on celiac disease rates as gathered by The National Swedish Childhood Celiac Disease Register. An incident case-referent study of infants was also performed.
    To be considered for the study, children were required to have been diagnosed with celiac disease through three biopsies (one for diagnosis, one on gluten-free diet and one after gluten challenge). 475 participants qualified and were diagnosed with celiac disease as infants. For each selected child, 2 referents were chosen based on date of birth, area of residence and gender. All participants and referents were given questionnaires regarding family characteristics, infant feeding and general health. Final inclusion in the study required complete vaccination records of participants and at least one referent. 1015 total infants qualified: 392 case children and 623 referents.
    The case-referent study and statistical analyses showed that changes in Swedish vaccination programs did not seem to correlate with the celiac disease epidemic. Introduction of the pertussis vaccine did coincide with a rise in celiac disease rates, however the infant case-referent study showed no association between the vaccine and celiac disease. Haemophilus influenzae type b and measles/mumps/rubella vaccines also showed no association. Diptheria/tetanus and polio vaccines covered 99% of participants, and were thus not feasible candidates. Vaccination against tuberculosis (BCG) actually showed possibility for some protective effect (further studies may explore this).
    The early vaccination programs enacted by Sweden in the past few decades do not seem to correlate with the celiac disease epidemic. However, we cannot generalize these findings too much, as not all vaccines are the same, and we still don't know what factors are in play here. The results of this study show that we are still a long way from understanding exactly what environmental factors contribute to celiac disease.
    Source:
    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/130/1/e63.full

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/30/2013 - Currently, doctors diagnose celiac disease with blood tests that screen for two antibodies, one that targets gluten and another that goes after an intestinal protein. The tests work pretty well to spot advanced cases of celiac disease, but by that time, patients are already suffering intestinal damage.
    A research team looking into a method for reliable earlier detection of celiac disease focused on the responses of certain bacteria to celiac disease.
    They have built a library of peptides on the surfaces of bacteria which capture new antibodies associated with celiac disease. This, in turn, has led them to a new technique for harvesting celiac disease antibodies, which may help improve diagnosis for celiac disease, especially early on. The researchers say the technique may allow them to successfully tell, much earlier than before, which perspective celiac sufferers are sick and which are healthy.
    The research team included Bradley N. Spatola, Joseph A. Murray, Martin Kagnoff, Katri Kaukinen, and Patrick S. Daugherty. They are affiliated with the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of California at Santa Barbara, California, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, the Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology, Department of Medicine and the Department of Pediatrics at the University of California at San Diego in La Jolla, California and with the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
    For their study, Patrick Daugherty, of the University of California, Santa Barbara, and his team aimed to find previously unknown disease-linked antibodies. Their strategy centered on building an enormous library of random peptide sequences to find ones that would bind to the antibodies.
    To create their library, the researchers inserted one billion random peptide genes into Escherichia coli, with one peptide gene per bacterium.
    Once the genes were expressed inside the bacteria, thousands of copies of the peptides migrated to the cells’ surface. The researchers hoped that some of these peptides would bind antibodies from the blood of people with early-stage celiac disease, but not those in samples from healthy people.
    The team hoped that their approach, with numerous bacteria each bearing a different peptide, would be more likely to identify unknown antibodies than are current types of peptide libraries, which must be mounted on hard surfaces.
    To test their new library approach, the researchers collected blood samples from 40 healthy people and 45 people who had been diagnosed with celiac disease.
    They purified antibodies from the blood samples, then labeled antibodies from half the celiac patients with a green fluorescent dye and the rest of the patients’ antibodies with a red dye.
    They then mixed the peptide-coated bacteria together with all the antibodies, adding five times as many unlabeled antibodies from the healthy subjects to block labeled antibodies from binding to peptides found in people with and without celiac disease.
    Next, they sorted the cells, collecting only those bacteria displaying both red and green fluorescence.
    Cells labeled with both dyes, the researchers reasoned, help a peptide that could bind to an antibody found in at least two people, one patient from each group. These antibodies, they say, could be markers for celiac disease.
    Additional screening of the peptides with antibodies from healthy patients and those with celiac disease, the researchers narrowed the bacterial pool down to six unique peptides, none of which bind to known celiac antibodies.
    The researchers then measured binding between these peptides and the full suite of antibodies from patients’ blood. Based on that data, they used a statistical analysis to conclude that they could identify correctly 85% of people with celiac disease and 91% of healthy – nearly matching the values of existing diagnostic tests.
    It remains uncertain whether this approach will permit doctors to diagnose celiac disease at earlier stages than current methods, but the results look promising, and the team remains hopeful.
    Daugherty says that the method is applicable to other immune disorders, including difficult-to-diagnose illnesses such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, and some cancers.
    Source:
    Anal. Chem., 2013, 85 (2), pp 1215–1222. DOI: 10.1021/ac303201d

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    It is meant to be restrictive -  so you don’t run any risk of cc with gluten.  That really is the fundamental basis.  It isn’t meant to be fun or interesting.  It is meant for people who are very sick and the normal gluten-free diet isnt working.  It is a last step before medications.  It is not a lifestyle or a life long diet.  So, for those who really need it for its original intent- they are going to follow it to the letter with a doctor , who is versed in Celiac.   Lots of people try pa
    I have ataxia and for me it is a feeling like walking on a ship that is in a high sea. I had ataxia since childhood and needed canes by the time I was diagnosed. Over 40 years later... Ataxia has pretty much resoved but I did need to get physical therapy to walk normally. I don't however feel dizzy thankfully. If the dizzy feeling sticks around after your other gluten symptoms resolve it might be a good idea to see an ear doctor just to be on the safe side. Sometimes our body gets so busy fighti
    Corn would not make DH flare unless it was either CC'd in processing or was contaminated through your prep and cooking process. For example grilling the corn on a grill that had gluten prepared on it previously or washing it in a colander that had pasta drained previously.  IMHO Squirmy is spot on. Give yourself some time to heal on the gluten free diet and avoid HIGH iodine sources like iodized salt, seaweed and seafood. The bit of natural iodine in veggies and fruits shouldn't be an issue. If
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