• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    74,198
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Mina.ts
    Newest Member
    Mina.ts
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • Scott Adams

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Gluten Sensitivity Without Celiac Disease: Notes from the Front Lines


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 05/14/2012 - Should gluten sensitivity be thought of as “celiac light,” as just one of the milder manifestations within the wider spectrum of celiac disease? Some doctors and researchers think so.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Photo: CC--Joe MabelOver the past several years, there has been increasing discussion concerning gluten sensitivity as a possible cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms in patients for whom celiac disease has been excluded. 

    This is undoubtedly because gluten sensitivity, like IBS, is a symptom-based condition of diverse pathogenesis. As discussed, some have argued that gluten sensitivity might be best thought of as “celiac light,” representing the milder domains of the celiac disease spectrum.

    However, there are some data to suggest that a subset of patients with gluten sensitivity may actually belong to the spectrum of celiac disease.

    In a recent letter to the editors of the American Journal of Gastroenterology, doctors Courtney C. Ferch and William D. Chey of the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, Michigan, comment at length on the latest findings regarding Irritable Bowel Syndrome and gluten sensitivity without celiac disease.

    Ferch and Chey note that gluten sensitivity is one of the most rapidly growing sectors in the food industry, with gluten-free products accounting for $1.31 billion in U.S. sales alone in 2011. Those sales are expected to exceed $1.6 billion by 2015.

    Major food manufacturers such as General Mills and Betty Crocker, along with popular restaurant chains like PF Chang's and Subway are busy introducing new gluten-free options, or retooling original products into gluten-free versions.

    People with gluten sensitivity typically show symptoms after eating gluten, but show no evidence of celiac disease or food allergy.

    Unlike celiac disease, there are no accepted biomarkers for gluten-sensitivity. Doctors diagnose the condition mainly by looking at the connection between eating gluten and the presence adverse symptoms.

    Numerous studies on gluten sensitivity suffer have included small sample size, a lack of adequate controls, a lack of blinding, and the use of non-validated outcome measures. Even with these limitations, Ferch and Chey say there are several studies worthy of further consideration.

    One of the studies discussed in the Ferch and Chey was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dietary re-challenge trial performed by Biesiekierski et al. The study sought to better understand the role of gluten ingestion in the development of gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms in patients diagnosed with IBS.

    The Biesiekierski study included a sample of 34 patients diagnosed with IBS by the Rome III criteria who had experienced symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet for 6 weeks before study enrollment. Celiac disease had been excluded in all study participants by either a negative HLADQ2/HLA-DQ8 haplotype or a normal duodenal biopsy. The study excluded patients with conditions such as cirrhosis, inflammatory bowel disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ingestion, or excessive alcohol.

    Over a six week double-blind randomization phase, study participants followed either a gluten-free or gluten-containing diet that was assigned at random. Nineteen of the 34 patients ate food containing 16 g of gluten per day. The other 15 patients ate gluten-free bread and mufï¬ns. Gluten used in the study was free of fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols, and its protein distribution included 2.3% nongluten, 45.7% glutenin, and 52% gliadin.

    The primary outcome of the study was the proportion of patients answering “no” on over half of the occasions at the end of each week to this question: “Over the past week, were your symptoms adequately controlled?”

    The study team also assessed secondary outcomes including bloating, abdominal pain, satisfaction with stool consistency, nausea, and tiredness using a 100-mm visual analog scale.

    Once the study period ended, the results showed that many more patients in the gluten group compared with the gluten-free group answered “no” to the primary outcome question (68% vs 40%; P .001).

    Compared with the gluten-ingesting group, those who remained gluten-free also reported signiï¬cant improvements in pain (P .016), bloating (P .031), satisfaction with stool consistency (P .024), and tiredness (P .001), although they showed similar levels of wind (P .053) or nausea (P .69).

    The results of celiac antibodies at baseline and after the dietary intervention were
    similar.  The team also found that diet had no effect on intestinal permeability as measured by urine lactuloseto-rhamnose ratio. Additionally, they found detectable fecal lactoferrin levels in just one patient during the treatment period.

    Meanwhile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels remained normal before and after the dietary intervention.

    There was no difference in the level of symptoms experienced by those with and without HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 alleles. The authors felt that these data support the existence of non–celiac-associated gluten sensitivity. They concluded that gluten is in fact tied to overall IBS symptoms, bloating, dissatisfaction with stool consistency, abdominal pain, and fatigue in some patients.

    In their letter, Ferch and Chey also comment on several side issues.

    First, they note that a recent global meta-analyses of studies showed that patients with IBS symptoms had signiï¬cantly higher rates of celiac disease than controls. As such, they point out that the American College of Gastroenterology Task Force now recommends routine celiac blood screens for patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS and IBS with a mixed bowel pattern (grade 1B recommendation).

    Secondly, they note that there has been much recent discussion around the potential role of food in IBS symptoms that has focused on celiac disease. However, they point out that much has been made over the possible role of food, and possibly celiac disease, in IBS symptoms. However, they note that data from US studies show no higher risk for celiac disease among patients with IBS symptoms and no warning signs.

    Although these results are certainly intriguing and hypothesis generating, they require validation in larger, randomized, controlled trials in other parts of the world.

    What is clear and important for providers to understand is that gluten sensitivity is here to stay and signiï¬cantly more likely for them to encounter in day-to-day practice than celiac disease.

    Read the full letter by Ferch and Chey at the website for the  American Journal of Gastroenterology.

    Source:


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Joe Mabel
    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Bettye Whitten

    Posted

    I found this article to be very informative. As one who suffers from irritable bowel syndrome, I am always looking for any helpful hints. Thanks

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Judy

    Posted

    They gave them gluten-free bread and muffins, but did not restrict the rest of their diet? How about pasta, soy sauce, gravy, etc.? To really make a difference, the study needs to be completely gluten-free.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest C. Ray

    Posted

    Good article. I was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome about 8 years before I was diagnosed with celiac disease. When I began eating glutenfree because of the celiac disease diagnosis, my "IBS" symptoms went away. I suspect in the years to come there will be more information on the link between gluten, irritable bowel syndrome, gluten sensitivity, and celiac disease.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Alison

    Posted

    As a matter of fact, about 4 years ago I thought perhaps trying a gluten-free diet would help my irritable bowel syndrome. So for at least three months I switched to totally gluten-free. The results? For me anyway - absolutely no change. I guess in my case, irritable bowel syndrome is not affected at all by gluten.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Jackie

    Posted

    Very helpful. I am going to pay more attention to this. I have found more issues when eating gluten alone than when I eat it with other foods. Example: sandwich is ok, plain bread is bad.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Robert E Hadwick

    Posted

    Just trying to read all I can after being diagnosed with celiac spew. Very good article.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Lois Parker

    Posted

    This is helpful but now I wish someone would approach the connection between "near-celiac" or irritable bowel syndrome with gluten sensitivity and sensitivity to dairy and soy sensitivity! It is easy enough to research one of the three but it seems many people have this same additional problem, and it bears research as well.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Mary M. Cushnie-Mansour

    Posted

    I have had irregular bowels all of my life, so decided to finally go to a naturalpath. Celiac disease runs in my family - two of my children have it, and two or three cousins (that I know of). While experimenting with foods, in and out of the diet, several interesting results were discovered - it is surprising what one learns about the effects of food on our system. Great article here, to prove that one does not have to be a full blown celiac to have the gluten sensitivity, and what this possibly tells me is that if there is a sensitivity there in the first place, it is only a matter of time before you become full blown. Why not take the action from now and just eat gluten-free - I am!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Cindy Chong

    Posted

    They gave them gluten-free bread and muffins, but did not restrict the rest of their diet? How about pasta, soy sauce, gravy, etc.? To really make a difference, the study needs to be completely gluten-free.

    You are absolutely correct. But then again, there is the possibility that the tests were to identify or screen out, the patients who were "a-symptomatic" through suggestion?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Anne Marie

    Posted

    I have been following all possible links to irritable bowel syndrome and gluten-free/non-celiac research information for the last 6 years as I have severe irritable bowel syndrome but not celiac disease (endoscopy tested twice). Now with the additional diagnosis of Gerd and Barretts's esophogus I am really trying to uncover the cause of these gastrointestinal issues. I have explored the fructose malabsorption diagnosis and am amazed at the relief I have received eliminating the FODMAPS. Gluten is one of the foods to eliminate not because of the 'gluten proteins' but because of the fructan component. I wish I had learned about this sooner and wonder why this 'fructan' component of gluten is not discussed more frequently. Gluten-free is wonderful but often not enough to bring total relief of gut sensitivities.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Hilary

    Posted

    I was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome first and celiac disease many years later. This is an excellent article/letter. Now if the gastrointestinal community will get on board...

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Gill

    Posted

    Whilst searching for info about my recent irritable bowel syndrome symptoms I found out that Hashimoto's thyroiditis sufferers are recommended to go gluten-free. I decided then and there to try it out. After only two days, my irritable bowel syndrome symptoms had almost dissappeared. Also, my aching arms and constant lack of energy are now a thing of the past. I feel so much better, so gluten-free will now be permanent for me. By the way, I am lactose intolerant and as I also have Graves' disease I can't eat soy products either.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Jenny W

    Posted

    I have been following all possible links to irritable bowel syndrome and gluten-free/non-celiac research information for the last 6 years as I have severe irritable bowel syndrome but not celiac disease (endoscopy tested twice). Now with the additional diagnosis of Gerd and Barretts's esophogus I am really trying to uncover the cause of these gastrointestinal issues. I have explored the fructose malabsorption diagnosis and am amazed at the relief I have received eliminating the FODMAPS. Gluten is one of the foods to eliminate not because of the 'gluten proteins' but because of the fructan component. I wish I had learned about this sooner and wonder why this 'fructan' component of gluten is not discussed more frequently. Gluten-free is wonderful but often not enough to bring total relief of gut sensitivities.

    My grandson has been diagnosed with celiac disease and also has irritable bowel syndrome, or a bowel problem that has not cleared up after 2 years on a gluten-free diet. At 13, he is not quite in control of his life yet, and I am trying to help. I have just discovered FODMAPS and wonder if you can elaborate on the connection between gluten and fructan. Maybe that is the key to making his life more bearable! I hope so!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Linda

    Posted

    I went on the Ideal Protein diet for 3 months and along with weight loss, I was amazed and pleased with the peace in my gut. The diet eliminates ALL carbs. Now I am maintaining my weight but the constipation and pain is back. I'm going to try eliminating gluten and see if that peaceful gut returns.

    Thanks!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I was diagnosed with IBS in 1992. I have not found symptom relief until recently. I have been gluten free for one month and noticed a tremendous improvement in my IBS symptoms. I plan to speak to my doctor soon to see if I should have endoscopy to rule out celiac disease. I don't know anyone in my family with celiac, but I do have a family history significant for digestive disorders such as Colitis/Crohn's (which I know I do not have).

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   2 Members, 0 Anonymous, 216 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/15/2008 - Many people with celiac disease have stories to tell about the about how difficult it can be to get a getting a proper diagnosis. Celiac disease can mimic so many other conditions. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is one of those conditions. The symptoms for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and for celiac disease are often similar as a result the diagnosis of celiac disease can be delayed or missed and misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome.
    In an effort to reduce the misdiagnosis of celiac disease as Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Britain’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has drawn up new guidelines covering the diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The guidelines call for all diagnosis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome to be preceded by a screen for celiac disease. Keeping this in mind, anyone suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and who has not been tested for celiac disease, might want to take the initiative and check with their doctor to see if further testing might be in order.
    Studies show that a minimum of 1 out of every 100 people in Britain suffers from celiac disease, but that only 1 out of 8 is properly diagnosed. More worrisome still is the fact that new research shows that it takes an incredible 13 years on average before the diagnosis are made. That means 13 years of unnecessary pain and discomfort, to say nothing of potential systemic damage for those awaiting a proper diagnosis of celiac disease, including osteoporosis, bowel cancer and increased risk of other autoimmune diseases.
    Since similar numbers likely prevail in America, it's good to keep an eye on clinical changes like the one recently made in Britain. Again, for people diagnosed with IBS, but who have not been evaluated for celiac disease, it might be good to consider getting checked for celiac disease, even if these changes are not officially implemented in America anytime soon. Changes in diagnostic and treatment practices that benefit people with celiac disease are long overdue and highly welcomed by the celiac community.
    As our abilities to evaluate diagnostic and treatment practices continue to expand, look for important changes in the clinical approach to celiac disease, greater awareness among the general population, and improvements in the quality of life among celiacs.
    References:
    1.    The Economic Burden of Coeliac Disease in the UK research paper
    2.    Recent advances in Coeliac Disease by D.A. van Heel and J. West, published in Gut 2006 55, pp 1037-1046
    3.    Coeliac Society of the UK


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2009 - People with clinical irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) suffer from biopsy-proven celiac disease at rates that are more than four times higher than in non-IBS control subjects, according to the results of a recent systematic review and meta-analysis conducted by Alexander C. Ford, MBChB, MD, MRCP, from Health Sciences Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues.
    Prior studies have indicated that people with IBS had higher rates of celiac disease, but evidence has not been clear, and medical guidelines do not always call for celiac screening in these individuals.
    To determine rates of celiac disease in random adults meeting clinical criteria for IBS, the research team reviewed MEDLINE from 1950 to May 31, 2008, and EMBASE from 1980 to May 31, 2008. They isolated case series and case-control studies that contained data for celiac disease blood screens. They found 14 such studies.
    From each study, they isolated and aggregated positive serologic test results for celiac disease and biopsy-proved celiac disease. They then compared the data to that for patients with IBS and control individuals, using an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI).
    The team isolated 4204 suitable cases from the identified studies. Of those, 2278 met clinical criteria for IBS (54%). The overall rate of positive immunoglobulin A (IgA)–class antigliadin antibodies (AGA) was 4.0% (95% CI, 1.7% – 7.2%), the rate of positive endomysial antibodies (EMA) was 1.63% (95% CI, 0.7% – 3.0%), and the rate of tissue transglutaminase (tTGA) was 4.1% (95% CI, 1.9% – 7.0%). For biopsy-proven celiac disease, the overall rate was 4.1% (95% CI, 1.9% – 7.0%).
    In patients who met the clinical criteria for IBS compared with non-IBS control subjects, aggregate OR for positive IgA-class antigliadin antibodies was 3.40 (95% CI, 1.62 – 7.13), aggregate OR for either positive EMA or tTGA was 2.94 (95% CI, 1.36 – 6.35), and aggregate OR for biopsy-proved celiac disease was 4.34 (95% CI, 1.78 – 10.6).
    The study did have some weaknesses, including issues with the methodology governing study selection, possible spectrum bias in case-control studies, possible selection bias in studies based in secondary care, and, in some cases, results too limited to allow meaningful aggregation of data.
    Still the research team concludes that rates of biopsy-proven celiac disease are more than four times higher for IBS patients than for non-IBS controls. The team recommends that, if screening is undertaken, EMA or tTGA testing be used in lieu of IgA-AGA testing due to their higher positive predictive value, though they admitted that results will depend on celiac rates in the population being screened.  
    The study was supported by the American College of Gastroenterology.

    Arch Intern Med. 2009;169:651–658.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/28/2012 - Two researchers recently set out to study gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. The study was conducted by A. Di Sabatino A, and G.R. Corazza of the Centro per lo Studio e la Curia della Mallatia Celiaca at the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo at the University of Pavia in Italy.
    A number of studies support the existence non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which can be marked by both internal and external symptoms in individuals with normal small-bowel mucosa and negative results on serum anti-transglutaminase and anti-endomysial antibody testing. These symptoms are very similar to traditional celiac disease symptoms, and seem to improve or disappear with the adoption of a gluten-free diet.
    Although researchers are currently debating the clinical aspects of this condition, studies indicate that the prevalence of non-celiac gluten sensitivity in the general population may be many times higher than that of celiac disease.
    Further study and diagnosis of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is being hindered by the lack of a clear definition of the condition. The lack of a clear definition is due at least in part to the fact that there is no single known cause, and the symptoms are likely influenced by a variety of factors.
    More work needs to be done to establish a clear definition for non-celiac gluten intolerance, and to delineate diagnostic protocols. The research team notes that if it turns out that non-celiac gluten sensitivity does in fact have multiple triggers, then treatment options should vary accordingly.
    However, any treatment would likely include a gluten-free diet.
    Source:
    Ann Intern Med. 2012 Feb 21;156(4):309-11.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2014 - Differentiating between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is important for appropriate treatment, but is often challenging.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess the best way to distinguish between celiac disease and non-gluten sensitivity. The research team included Toufic A Kabbani, Rohini R Vanga, Daniel A Leffler, Javier Villafuerte-Galvez, Kumar Pallav, Joshua Hansen, Rupa Mukherjee, Melinda Dennis and Ciaran P Kelly.
    For their study, the team reviewed records for 238 patients who were assessed for symptoms responsive to gluten restriction without having celiac disease ruled in or out. For each patient, clinicians noted the demographic information, presenting symptoms, serologic, genetic, and histologic data, nutrient deficiencies, personal history of autoimmune diseases, and family history of celiac disease.
    They define NCGS as symptoms responsive to a gluten-free diet, together with negative celiac blood tests and negative duodenal biopsies while on a gluten-containing diet, or negative human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2/DQ8 testing. Of the 238 patients in the study, 101 had celiac disease, 125 had NCGS, 9 had non-celiac enteropathy, and 3 remained undetermined. Nearly 70% of celiac disease subjects suffered symptoms of malabsorption compared with just under 25% of the NCGS subjects (P<0.0001).
    In addition, the patients with celiac disease were far more likely to have a family history of celiac disease (P=0.004), personal history of autoimmune diseases (P=0.002), or nutrient deficiencies (P<0.0001).
    The positive likelihood ratio for celiac disease diagnosis of a >2× upper limit of normal IgA trans-glutaminase antibody (tTG) or IgA/IgG deaminated gliadan peptide antibody (DGP) with clinical response to a gluten-free diet was 130 (confidence interval (CI): 18.5–918.3).
    The positive likelihood ratio of the combination of gluten-responsive symptoms and negative IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP on a regular diet for NCGS was 9.6 (CI: 5.5–16.9).
    When individuals with negative IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP also lacked symptoms of malabsorption (weight loss, diarrhea, and nutrient deficiencies) and celiac disease risk factors (personal history of autoimmune diseases and family history of celiac disease), the positive likelihood ratio for NCGS increased to 80.9.
    Based on their findings, the team developed a diagnostic algorithm to distinguish celiac disease from NCGS.
    People with negative celiac blood tests (IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP, who are eating a regular gluten-containing diet, are unlikely to have celiac disease.
    Those with negative serology who show no clinical signs of malabsorption, and show no celiac disease risk factors, are highly likely to have NCGS and may not require further testing. Those with positive blood tests should undergo HLA typing to determine the need for biopsy.
    Source:
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology 109, 741-746 (May 2014) doi:10.1038/ajg.2014.41

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com