Jump to content
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Is There a Connection Between Antibiotic Use and Celiac Disease Autoimmunity?

      Association Between Early-Life Antibiotic Use and the Risk of Islet or Celiac Disease Autoimmunity

    Caption: Photo: CC--Oliver Dodd

    Celiac.com 11/07/2017 - Researchers still don't have much good data on the consequences of antibiotic use in early life and how that relates to the risk of certain autoimmune diseases.

    A team of researchers recently set out to test the association between early-life antibiotic use and islet or celiac disease autoimmunity in genetically at-risk children prospectively followed up for type 1 diabetes (T1D) or celiac disease. Their study is part of a larger study called The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young, or TEDDY, for short.

    The reasearch team enrolled HLA-genotyped newborns from Finland, Germany, Sweden, and the United States between November 20, 2004, and July 8, 2010, and analyzed data from November 20, 2004, to August 31, 2014.

    They also enrolled individuals from the general population, and those having a first-degree relative with T1D, with any 1 of 9 HLA genotypes associated with a risk for T1D. The team charted parental reports of the most common antibiotics, such as cephalosporins, penicillins, and macrolides, used between age 3 months and age 4 years.

    Islet autoimmunity and celiac disease autoimmunity were defined as being positive for islet or tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies at 2 consecutive clinic visits at least 3 months apart. The team used Cox proportional hazards regression models to assess the relationship between antibiotic use in early life before seroconversion and the development of autoimmunity, and to calculate hazard ratios and 95% CIs.

    The team conducted tests for islet and tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies on 8,495 children (49.0% female), and 6,558 children (48.7% female) who were enrolled in the TEDDY study, and they found that antibiotic exposure and frequency of use in early life or before seroconversion did not influence the risk of developing islet autoimmunity or celiac disease autoimmunity.

    Additionally, cumulative use of any antibiotic during the first 4 years of life was not tied to the appearance of any autoantibody (hazard ratio


    , 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95-1.01), multiple islet autoantibodies (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.95-1.03), or the transglutaminase autoantibody (HR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.98-1.02).

    Using any of the most common antibiotics during the first 4 years of life, in any geographic region, did not influence the later development of autoimmunity for T1D or celiac disease.

    Based on these results, the team concluded that doctors recommending antibiotics for young children at risk for T1D or celiac disease need not be concerned that the use will lead to islet or tissue transglutaminase autoimmunity.

    Source:

     

    The research team included Kaisa M. Kemppainen, PhD; Kendra Vehik, PhD; Kristian F. Lynch, PhD; Helena Elding Larsson, MD, PhD; Ronald J. Canepa, BSc; Ville Simell, MSc; Sibylle Koletzko, MD, PhD; Edwin Liu, MD; Olli G. Simell, MD, PhD; Jorma Toppari, MD, PhD; Anette G. Ziegler, MD, PhD; Marian J. Rewers, MD, PhD; Åke Lernmark, PhD; William A. Hagopian, MD, PhD; Jin-Xiong She, PhD; Beena Akolkar, PhD; Desmond A. Schatz, MD; Mark A. Atkinson, PhD; Martin J. Blaser, MD; Jeffrey P. Krischer, PhD; Heikki Hyöty, MD, PhD; Daniel Agardh, MD, PhD; and Eric W. Triplett, PhD; for The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) Study Group.

    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville; the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa; the Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Clinical Research Center, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; the MediCity Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; the Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig Maximilian University, München, Germany; the Digestive Health Institute, Children's Hospital Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora; the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland; the Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the Department of Physiology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, München, Germany; the Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Germany; the Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V., Neuherberg, Germany; the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora; the Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute, Seattle, Washington; the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, Maryland; the Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville; the Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville; the Department of Medicine and Microbiology, New York School of Medicine, New York; the Department of Virology, Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; and with Fimlab Laboratories, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    FWIW, my symptoms went full blown (i.e., diarrhea that continued for 4 months until I hit upon the gluten free diet) after a double round of antibiotics for an infected root canal- at the age of 50. I was never diagnosed- went gluten-free on my own as my physician was clueless about celiac disease. The diarrhea stopped immediately and a blistery rash that developed during the last week and many other symptoms that had plagued me my adult life disappeared as well- migraine, canker sores, muscle spasms, etc. I attributed the diarrhea to my gut microbiome being upset by the antibiotics, but equilibrium should have been re-established with probiotics, yet nothing helped but the gluten-free diet. Some change was triggered but I´m sure now that I was probably gluten sensitive my whole life, just didn't know it.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/27/2014 - Can antibiotic exposure in pregnancy increase the risk of celiac disease in children? Some researchers suspect that infant microbiota play a pathogenic role in celiac disease. The idea that antibiotic treatment in pregnancy could significantly impact the infant microbiota, and thus influence the development of celiac disease, has led many to ponder the possible connection.
    To get a clearer picture, a research team recently set out to study the effects on offspring of antibiotic exposure in pregnancy.
    The team included Karl Mårild, Johnny Ludvigsson, Yolanda Sanz, and Jonas F. Ludvigsson. They are variously affiliated with the Deptartment of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, the Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital at Karolinska University Hospital in Solna, Sweden, the Division of Paediatrics in the Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine at Linköping University, Östergötland County Council in Linköping, Sweden, the Department of Paediatrics of Örebro University Hospital in Örebro, Sweden, and the Microbial Ecology and Nutrition Research Group at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology of the National Research Council (IATA-CSIC) in Valencia, Spain.
    The team started by reviewing existing data on antibiotic exposure in pregnancy in 8,729 children recorded in the All Babies in Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort study. Through December 2006, 46 of the 8,729 had developed celiac disease. The team then used Cox regression to estimate celiac disease hazard ratios (HRs) in children whose mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy. The ratios were adjusted based on parent-reported diary data on breastfeeding, age at gluten introduction, and the number of infections in the child's first year of life.
    Of the 1,836 children exposed to antibiotics during pregnancy, 12 (0.7%) children developed celiac disease as compared with 34/6893 (0.5%) unexposed children (HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 0.69–2.56).
    Risk estimates remained unchanged after adjustment for breastfeeding, age at gluten introduction and infection load in the child's first year of life (HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 0.66–2.48).
    When all the data were factored, the team found no statistically significant connection between antibiotic exposure during pregnancy and celiac disease in offspring. The team suggests that this data may present an accurate picture, or it may be that they simply lack the statistical power to make a clear connection.
    Further studies are likely needed before researchers can confidently conclude that there is no connection between antibiotic exposure in pregnancy and celiac disease in offspring.
    Source:
     BMC Gastroenterol. 2014;14(75)

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/20/2015 - A Canadian researcher has discovered what might be a big step toward preventing celiac disease. Dr. Elena Verdú, an associate professor at the Farncombe Family Digestive Health Research Institute at McMaster University, has found that bacteria in the gut may contribute to the body's response to gluten. 
    If her discovery pans out, it may be possible to treat, or even prevent, celiac disease by changing the the type of bacteria in the gut. "By changing the type of bacteria in the gut, we could change the inflammatory response to gluten," says Verdú.
    So far, researchers have been unable to explain why 30 per cent of people have genes that can cause celiac disease, but only 2 to 5 per cent actually develop it. Also a mystery is why the disease develops at any age. Higher rates of celiac disease are being driven not just be better testing and awareness, but also by external triggers.
    According to Dr. Decker Butzner, a Calgary-based pediatric gastroenterologist, there are another triggering factor which we've never understood…[t]here is an environmental trigger."
    Researchers have known for some time that people with celiac disease have different types of gut bacteria than those without celiac disease, but they didn't whether the changes in gut bacteria were caused by celiac disease, or the other way around.
    Verdú's study, which found that the inflammatory response to gluten was impacted by gut microbiota, is the first study to show that it is the gut microbes are likely triggering celiac disease.
    The study appears in the American Journal of Pathology.
    Read more at TheSpec.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    People with Type 1 Diabetes Show Distinct Gut Inflammation and Microbiota
    Celiac.com 02/01/2017 - More and more evidence shows a connection between gut inflammation and type 1 diabetes (T1D). A team of researchers recently set out to assess gut inflammatory profiles and microbiota in patients with T1D, and to compare them with healthy controls (CTRL) and with celiac disease patients as gut inflammatory disease controls.
    The research team included Silvia Pellegrini, Valeria Sordi, Andrea Mario Bolla, Diego Saita Roberto Ferrarese, Filippo Canducci, Massimo Clementi, Francesca Invernizzi, Alberto Mariani, Riccardo Bonfanti, Graziano Barera, Pier Alberto Testoni, Claudio Doglioni, Emanuele Bosi, and Lorenzo Piemonti. They are affiliated with the Diabetes Research Institute at the IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan, Italy.
    The team evaluated inflammatory status and microbiome composition in biopsies of the duodenal mucosa from 19 patients with T1D, 19 with celiac disease, and 16 healthy control subjects, recruited at San Raffaele Scientific Institute, in Milan, Italy, between 2009 and 2015. They assessed inflammation by gene expression study and immunohistochemistry and used 16S rRNA gene sequencing to analyze microbiome composition.
    Compared to CTRL and celiac disease patients, the team found an increased expression of CCL13, CCL19, CCL22, CCR2, COX2, IL4R, CD68, PTX3, TNFα and VEGFA genes in T1D patients. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed T1D specific inflammatory status was mainly marked by increased monocyte/macrophage lineage infiltration, compared to healthy and celiac disease control tissues.
    The T1D duodenal mucosal microbiome also proved to be different from the control groups. This was mainly marked by increased Firmicutes, and Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio and a reduction in Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes.
    The expression of genes specific for T1D inflammation was associated with the excess of specific bacteria in duodenum. This study shows that patients with T1D show specific abnormalities in gut inflammation and microbiota.
    Greater knowledge of the complex pathogenesis of T1D will likely provide new directions for therapies targeting the gut. Look for more studies in this area in the near future, as scientists look to nail down specific treatments to prevent gut inflammation.
    Source:
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2016-3222

    Jefferson Adams
    Infections in Early Life Associated with Increased Risk for Celiac Disease
    Celiac.com 07/21/2017 - In previous studies, a team of scientists led by Professor Anette-Gabriele Ziegler had already shown an association between infections in early childhood and the development of type 1 diabetes. In that study, the researchers saw the highest risk for type 1 diabetes in children who experienced repeated respiratory infections in the first six months of life.
    Recently, Zeigler and another team of colleagues from the Institute for Diabetes Research at Helmholtz Zentrum München, a partner in the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), set out to determine whether infections during infancy are associated with increased risk for celiac disease later on.
    Their current study shows that the risk of developing celiac disease is particularly high when gastrointestinal tract infections occur during the first year of life.
    To a lesser extent, an increased disease risk was also seen in connection with early respiratory tract infections. The risk seems to be particularly high for people who experience repeated gastrointestinal infections in the first year of life.
    Whether the connections with early infections and later celiac risk are causal or are based on changes in the microbiome or specific immune responses is not clear from the data, said first author Dr. Andreas Beyerlein.
    "However," Beyerlein added, "it seems that the increased risk of celiac disease is associated with a permanent inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in early childhood and is not caused by a specific viral or bacterial pathogen."
    The team reached their conclusion after analyzing fully anonymized data provided by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayern) of 295,420 children who were born between 2005 and 2007.
    Medically attended infections from birth until a median age of 8.5 years were considered in the analysis. A total of 853 children developed gluten intolerance, equivalent to 0.3 percent.
    Their results appear in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
    Source:
    Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health

  • Popular Contributors

  • Forum Discussions

    I spoke with my GI's office on Friday and was told the wait time would be 10 months - I kind of indicated that I wasn't sure I could wait that long and she offered to put me on their cancellation list, said this is the best she can do for getting me in any sooner. The GI didn't tell me to start the gluten challenge, I was not aware of how long the wait time was and started eating gluten on my own decision.  And now that I'm on the cancellation list I have to keep eating it so that if I get
    Im the same, I never know what to eat, some food does better than others for me, I went on to make my own soup and Im glad I did, I should do it more often and at least then J know what's going in to it, it wasn't the best first try but I enjoyed it haha
    Thank you for the advice, in the end I went and made my own soup, not great for my first try but it was better than potentially making myself worse, I enjoyed it, I got some vitamains too to take, I was able to find a liquid Vitamain B Complex, the store I went to was helpfull enough to show me what was Gluten Free.   I fealt awful around then, Im feeling like I have more energy now I can actually do things and focus more, Ill keep on like I have been, Im not 100% and still have some B
×
×
  • Create New...