Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Low Serum Vitamin B12 is Common in Celiac Disease and is not due to Autoimmune Gastritis

    Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2002 Apr;14(4):425-7. Related Articles, Links

    Celiac.com 07/30/2004 - The following abstract of a study that was done in 2002 emphasizes the importance of vitamin supplementation in the treatment of many celiacs:

    Dickey W. - Department of Gastroenterology, Altnagelvin Hospital, Londonderry BT47 6SB, Northern Ireland.

    OBJECTIVE: Although coeliac disease is a disorder of the proximal small bowel, associated vitamin B12 deficiency has been reported. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of B12 deficiency in a large series of coeliac patients, and to exclude the possibility that it is due to associated autoimmune gastritis.

    DESIGN: Prospective routine measurement of serum B12 in coeliac patients, with investigations for pernicious anaemia/autoimmune gastritis in B12-deficient patients.

    SETTING: Gastroenterology department of a large district general hospital.

    INTERVENTIONS: If they were not taking vitamin B12 supplements already, patients had serum B12 measured before starting dietary gluten exclusion. Those with low levels also had gastric biopsies taken and plasma gastrin and serum gastric parietal cell and intrinsic factor antibodies measured.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of low serum B12, and presence or absence of indicators of pernicious anaemia/autoimmune gastritis in patients with low serum B12.

    RESULTS: Of 159 patients, 13 had low serum B12 at diagnosis. A further six had been receiving B12 replacement therapy for 3-37 years before diagnosis, giving an overall prevalence of 12% (19 patients). Only 2/19 patients had gastric corpus atrophy, one with intrinsic factor antibodies and the other with hypergastrinaemia. There was no relationship between low B12 and clinical characteristics.

    CONCLUSIONS: Low B12 is common in coeliac disease without concurrent pernicious anaemia, and may be a presenting manifestation. B12 status should be known before folic acid replacement is started.

    \-->

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/20/2014 - Researchers don’t have much data on rates of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). To better understand any connections between the two conditions, a Dutch research team recently set out to examine the rates of celiac disease in patients with autoimmune hepatitis.
    Specifically, the team set out to investigate the relationship between AIH and celiac disease by assessing the prevalence of IgA tissue antitransglutaminase antibodies (TGA) and antiendomysium antibodies (EMA) in a large group of AIH patients.
    The research team N.M. van Gerven, S.F. Bakker, Y.S. de Boer, B.I. Witte, H. Bontkes, C.M. van Nieuwkerk, C.J Mulder, G. Bouma; and the Dutch AIH working group. They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Medical Immunology at the VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    For the first step in their study, the team used TGA antibody serology to determine the frequency of celiac disease in a group of 460 AIH patients. The team conducted EMA screens on any patients showing TGA positivity.
    They then used digital and written medical records to collect retrospective data on previously diagnosed celiac disease and patient characteristics, and compared those findings with archival data on the prevalence of celiac disease in the Netherlands. They found that six patients had a known history of celiac disease, but were currently in remission, as shown by negative TGA blood screens.
    In addition, ten of the 460 AIH patients (2.2%) showed positive IgA TGA. Positive EMA antibodies in these patients served to confirm celiac disease diagnosis.
    Overall, the team found celiac disease in 3.5% of AIH patients compared with just 0.35% in the general Dutch population (P<0.001).
    Discounting patients with either a primary biliary cirrhosis or primary sclerosing cholangitis overlap, the team found celiac disease in 11 (2.8%) AIH patients. This is the largest serological study to examine connections between AIH and celiac disease, and shows that patients with AIH have rates of celiac disease that are higher than those of the general population, but not as high as some studies have suggested.
    Still, the team advises doctors to consider the possibility of concurrent celiac disease in all AIH patients.
    Source:
    Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Oct;26(10):1104-7. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0000000000000172.

×
×
  • Create New...