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    No Good Case for Mass Celiac Screening Just Yet


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 11/09/2015 - Can mass screening for celiac disease help enough people, and improve enough lives to justify the cost and effort?


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    Photo: CC--Mint CandiesWhile celiac disease fulfills several WHO criteria for mass screening, such as high prevalence, available treatment and difficult clinical detection, it remains unproven that treatment of asymptomatic celiac disease can lower the risk of severe complications and improve quality of life, or that it is cost-effective.

    A research team recently set out to review the literature on screening for celiac disease in relation to the current World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for mass screening.

    The team included Jonas F Ludvigsson, Timothy R Card, Katri Kaukinen, Julio Bai, Fabiana Zingone, David S Sanders, and Joseph A Murray.

    The research team is variously affiliated with the Department of Paediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden, the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK, the School of Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland, the Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland, the Department of Internal Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland, the Department of Medicine, C Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital, Universidad del Salvador, Buenos Aires, Argentina, the Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy, the Regional GI and Liver Unit, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK, the Department of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, USA.

    The team conducted a PubMed search for all indexed papers on celiac disease screening published from 1900 until mid-2014. For all relevant abstracts the team read the corresponding paper in full.

    Their search revealed that current evidence is not sufficient to support mass screening for celiac disease.

    However, they do note that this strategy will help most patients with celiac disease, so active case-finding may be appropriate.

    They also note that, even though proof of benefit is lacking, screening for celiac disease may be appropriate in high-risk groups.


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    Guest Mary Thorpe

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    This article appears to contradict another in today's newsletter that showed intestinal damage just as bad in asymptomatic patients as symptomatic ones.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/11/2012 - In an effort to understand how delayed celiac disease diagnosis became the norm for most patients over the last few decades, a research team conducted a study to assess the issue. Their study also looked at how delayed diagnosis affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for those with celiac disease, and considered differences with respect to sex and age.
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    Authors: Fredrik Norstrom, Lars Lindholm, Olof Sandstrom, Katrina Nordyke, Anneli Ivarsson
    Source:

    BMC Gastroenterology 2011, 11:118. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-11-118

    Miranda Jade
    Celiac.com 02/08/2012 - Having finally being diagnosed with celiac disease myself, I enjoy writing about this autoimmune disease in my gluten-free advocacy work with my mom, Tina Turbin. However, there is a whole other segment of the population who, rather than having celiac disease, have a food sensitivity to gluten. In fact, according to The Food Intolerance Consumer, gluten-sensitive people make up 15% of Americans, whereas celiac disease is currently estimated to exist in 1% of the population. Clearly, in view of its prevalence in the U.S., gluten sensitivity needs to be addressed, but as it turns out, research is showing that an early diagnosis of gluten sensitivity is particularly crucial in preventing celiac disease and other serious health conditions from developing among the gluten-sensitive population.
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    Resources:

    TheGlutenSyndrome.net The Food Intolerance Consumer: Gluten Intolerance and Celiac Disease Gluten Free Help
    ALCAT: What is Food Sensitivity?
    Early Diagnosis of Gluten Sensitivity: Before the Villi are Gone by By Kenneth Fine, M.D.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/19/2013 - Data from blood studies suggest that about 1% or so of North Americans have celiac disease. However, there is no good screening data based on small intestinal biopsy performed during routine endoscopic evaluations.
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     Can J Gastroenterol. 2013 Jul;27(7):405-8.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/08/2015 - The goal of growth-monitoring programs in children is the early detection of any disorders that affect growth. Celiac disease is under-diagnosed in kids whose symptoms include faltering linear growth, short stature, or poor weight gain. A team of researchers recently set out to develop new evidence-based parameters for screening for growth disorders and to evaluate the performance of these cutoffs among children with celiac disease measured regularly in a nationwide growth screening program.
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    Source:
     JAMA Pediatr. 2015;169(3):e1525. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.25.

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    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
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    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
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    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
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    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.