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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    NORMAL GROWTH & NUTRITION FOR ASIAN CELIACS ON GLUTEN-FREE DIET


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 11/22/2007 - Faced with a lack of data on growth rates and histological recovery in Asian children with celiac disease, a team of doctors led by Surender K. Yachna set out to evaluate the result of a gluten-free diet.


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    The study findings appear in the Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology. The research team looked at forty-two children with celiac disease.

    The team chronicled weight and height as weight for height (WFH) and height standard deviation scores (HSDS) deviation scores. 25 of the 42 children underwent duodenal biopsies after 1 and 2 years, while 14 of the children underwent a third biopsy after being on a gluten-free diet for 3-7 years. The research team measured compliance with a gluten-free diet in the children using regular interviews & IgA anti-endomysial antibody estimation (EMA).

    The average HSDS was 3.3 + 1.6 with 76% showing an HSDS of <-2, with 60% of the children undernourished, with an average WfH of 81.6 + 5.7.

    Over an average follow-up span of 3.7 years, the HSDS improved significantly to -1.3 + 1.7, with 84% of cases achieving normal nutrition. The average growth rate was 13.9 cm for the first year, and 5.6 cm in the following years.

    The small bowel biopsies conducted upon diagnosis revealed Marsh IIIb subtotal villous atrophy in 18, or 72%, of the patients, and partial villous atrophy in 7, or 28%. Follow-up biopsy after 1-2 years revealed a change to partial villous atrophy in 17 of the 18 who originally showed Marsh IIIb subtotal villous atrophy. One patient showed a normal biopsy. All 7 patients who originally showed partial villous atrophy showed improvement.

    81% of the patients showed negative results for IgA endomysial antibody. Follow-up biopsies conducted after 5 years of Gluten-free Diet showed improvement to Marsh I-II, but no normalization.

    From these results, the team concluded that most children with celiac disease exhibit normal nutritional uptake and growth patterns with the introduction of a gluten-free diet, and that most also show significant improvement in small bowel histology, but none show normalization, even after 5 years of a dedicated gluten-free diet.

    Journal of Gastroenterology Hepatology. 2007; 22(8): 1300-1305


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    Guest Dr.Kapil Kumar Juneja

    Posted

    Doctor, please do a service for Asian celiacs. please list the gluten free medicines available in India & other Asian countries so that they can have them without any fear. Drug companies are not giving any details at all for the fear of exaggerated response by public.

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    Guest Wafaa Kandeel

    Posted

    It is my pleasure to read article like this . I have had celiac disease for 11 years . I hope to send any updates and articles about this disease to my e- mail.

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    Guest Bakura

    Posted

    Colloidal silver helped me a lot here. 2 teaspoons a day should work. I usually create about 2 tea-spoons of it, and mix it with my green tea (for best effects try it with oolong). It will repair any existing damages done by gluten to the villi and the cellular-lining of the small intestine and will literally HALT the problems within days, as well as replenish overall-body health, clean column as well as unblock neural pathways. Colloidal silver by record has treated over 650 diseases (even ancient Mayans, native indians, and Egyptians have been using it for ages). It is THE ancient medicine. Please let others who have celiac be aware of this. Gluten is toxic in nature and is usually found in (wheat, rye, barley) Commercial packed food or beer (which wheat dwells in) has a lot

    of gluten in it. A permanent avoidance of all things which contain wheat or gluten will help a lot. Good luck.

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  • Related Articles

    Roy Jamron

    Celiac.com 10/30/2006 - Two recent scientific publications have now shown that a rotavirus protein may be linked to celiac disease through a molecular mimicry mechanism and that the risk of developing celiac disease appears to increase in children in relation to the number of rotavirus infections. What does this mean? Does rotavirus cause celiac disease?
    Research has not yet determined the exact role of rotavirus in celiac disease. Researchers found, in active celiac disease, a subset of anti-tTG IgA antibodies recognize the rotavirus protein, VP-7. This means, in celiacs, that the immune system appears to respond to the rotavirus protein the same as it would to a gluten peptide. Hence, a rotavirus infection might, in part, look just like a large dose of ingested gluten in individuals predisposed to celiac disease.
    In the study, children genetically susceptible to celiac disease seemed to develop celiac disease in greater numbers after experiencing rotavirus infections than did those children who did not have rotavirus infections. Note that children NOT experiencing a rotavirus infection STILL developed celiac disease. Hence, some OTHER mechanism must be the actual CAUSE of celiac disease, NOT rotavirus. The fact is, the study does NOT show whether the children having rotavirus infections would have eventually developed celiac disease if they were NOT infected with rotavirus (and no study would be able to do so.) The study followed the children from infancy. The study needs to follow the children for many more years to see if the risk rates of children developing celiac disease who experience or do not experience rotavirus infections eventually match. This would eliminate rotavirus as a significant risk factor.
    Think of it this way. If instead of experiencing rotavirus infection, some children were fed large quantities of gluten and some children were fed small amounts of gluten, wouldnt it be expected that children fed MORE gluten would be more likely to develop celiac disease SOONER than the children receiving LESS gluten? Now, due to molecular mimicry, think of a rotavirus infection as being a large daily feeding of gluten. Hence, children experiencing rotavirus infections would be more likely to develop celiac disease SOONER than those children who are uninfected. Eventually, ALL children who would have developed celiac disease, sooner or later, would develop the disease.
    A previous study found a molecular mimicry mechanism may associate a rotavirus protein with celiac disease. Now a new study of rotavirus antibodies in 1,931 children carrying HLA alleles for celiac disease in the Denver metropolitan area seems to show that the risk of developing celiac disease increases as the frequency of rotavirus infection increases. The study followed children from infancy, taking blood samples at 9, 15, and 24 months and annually, thereafter. 54 children developed celiac disease at a median age of 4.4 years. The study found "Frequent rotavirus infections predicted a higher risk of celiac disease autoimmunity (compared with zero infections, rate ratio 1.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.39-9.56, for one infection and rate ratio 3.76, 95% CI 0.76-18.7, for 2 or more infections, rate ratio for trend per increase in number of infections = 1.94, 95% CI 1.04-3.61, p= 0.037)."
    Could rotavirus infection as an adult trigger celiac disease? Not likely. Though symptoms and diagnosis of celiac disease may come late in life, it has been shown celiac disease begins in early childhood. The prevalence of celiac disease in studies of children is the same as the prevalence of celiac disease in adults and does not increase with age.
    New Study:
    Am J Gastroenterol. 2006 Oct;101(10):2333-40.
    Rotavirus infection frequency and risk of celiac disease autoimmunity in early childhood: a longitudinal study.
    Stene LC, Honeyman MC, Hoffenberg EJ, Haas JE, Sokol RJ, Emery L, Taki I, Norris JM, Erlich HA, Eisenbarth
    GS, Rewers M.
    Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.
    Previous study:
    PLoS Medicine Volume 3, Issue 9, SEPTEMBER 2006
    In Celiac Disease, a Subset of Autoantibodies against Transglutaminase Binds Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Induces Activation of Monocytes
    Giovanna Zanoni, Riccardo Navone, Claudio Lunardi, Giuseppe Tridente, Caterina Bason, Simona Sivori, Ruggero Beri, Marzia Dolcino, Enrico Valletta, Roberto Corrocher, Antonio Puccetti

    Diana Gitig Ph.D.
    This article originally appeared in the Spring 2011 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 06/22/2011 - Gluten intolerance among people who do not have celiac disease seems to be an increasing reality, yet scientists have not been able to find any evidence explaining it. A team of researchers in Australia noted that the question of whether gluten can contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms and/ or induce injury to the proximal small intestine had never been directly assessed. So, they set out to assess it. Their results are published in the January 11, 2011 issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology. They conclude that “non-celiac gluten intolerance” may in fact exist, although they were unable to discern the potential mechanism.
    Their study population consisted of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) whose symptoms were alleviated by the elimination of gluten from their diet and who definitely did not have celiac disease, as determined by the absence of the HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8 haplotypes. If patients did express these haplotypes, celiac disease was excluded by a normal duodenal biopsy while they were on a gluten containing diet. Unfortunately the authors could only find 34 patients who met these criteria, but they maintain that they could still infer a statistically robust result from their data. Participants had to have been on a gluten free diet for at least six weeks at the beginning of the study. At that point, they were given a study muffin and two slices of study bread to eat every day for six weeks. These goods were baked from gluten free mixes in a gluten free facility, but half of them had gluten added. Importantly, it was only gluten, not wheat; the carbohydrates found in wheat, which are known to elicit GI symptoms, were not included. The study was randomized, double-blind, and placebo controlled, so neither the researchers nor the participants knew who was eating the gluten.
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    Source:

    Am. J Gastroenterol advance online publication 11 January 2011; doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.487

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/10/2012 - In celiac disease, doctors use video capsule endoscopy (VCE) mainly to follow-up on stubborn cases, and to diagnose adenocarcinoma, lymphoma or refractory celiac disease. However, some doctors are suggesting that VCE could replace standard esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and biopsy in certain circumstances.
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    Source:
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/06/2014 - Although the role of human digestive proteases in gluten proteins is quite well known, researchers don’t know much about the role of gut bacteria in the metabolism of these proteins. A research team recently set out to explore the diversity of the cultivable human gut microbiome involved in gluten metabolism.
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    Source:
    FEMS Microbiology Ecology, Volume 88, Issue 2, pages 309–319, May 2014. DOI: 10.1111/1574-6941.12295

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
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    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
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    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
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    Source:
    cnbc.com