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    Point-of-Care Test Helps Spot Undiagnosed Celiac Disease


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 01/19/2015 - A team of researchers set out to determine what factors might influence dissemination of a new and validated commercial Point-of-Care Test (POCT) for celiac disease, in the Mediterranean area, when used in settings where it was designed to be administered, especially in countries with poor resources.

    Photo: CC--JYL4032The research team included S. Costa, L. Astarita, M. Ben-Hariz, G. Currò, J. Dolinsek, A. Kansu, G. Magazzu, S. Marvaso, D. Micetic-Turku, S. Pellegrino, G. Primavera, P. Rossi, A. Smarrazzo, F. Tucci, C. Arcidiaco, and L. Greco.

    For their study, the team relied on family pediatricians in Italy, and nurses and pediatricians in Slovenia and Turkey, to look for celiac disease in 3,559 children aged 1-14 years, 1,480 (ages 14-23 years) and 771 (1-18 years) asymptomatic subjects, respectively. This was done at pediatrician offices, schools and university primary care centers

    The team used a new POCT that detects IgA-tissue antitransglutaminase antibodies and IgA deficiency in a finger-tip blood drop. Subjects with positive screens and those suspected of having celiac disease were referred to a Celiac Centre to confirm the diagnosis.

    The team then estimated POCT Positive Predictive Value (PPV) at tertiary care (with Negative Predictive Value) and in primary care settings, and POCT and celiac disease rates per thousand in primary care.

    At tertiary care setting, PPV of the POCT and 95% CI were 89.5 (81.3-94.3) and 90 (56-98.5) with Negative Predictive Value 98.5 (94.2-99.6) and 98.7% (92-99.8) in children and adults, respectively.

    In primary care settings of different countries where POCT was performed by a different number of personnel, PPV ranged from 16 to 33%, and the celiac disease rates per thousand ranged from 4.77 to 1.3, while and POCT rates ranged from 31.18 to 2.59, respectively.

    This study shows that interpretation of POCT results by different personnel may influence the performance of POC, but that use of POCT is an urgent priority for diagnosing celiac disease among people of countries with limited resources, such as rural populations and school children.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Destiny Stone
    Irish Study of Gluten-Free Foods
    Celiac.com 06/10/2010 - New research is currently underway in Ireland, as researchers test "pseudo-cereals" to determine the quality of  replacements for glutenous grains such as, wheat, rye and barley. Many celiacs, especially those with delayed diagnosis', suffer from malabsorbtion and malnutrition. It is therefore more important for celiacs to ingest grains that are vitamin fortified than it is for non-celiacs. Researchers at Teagasc Food Research Ashtown are attempting to address the nutritional concerns for gluten-free products. They are working to  formulate gluten-free bread products that are tasty, and have higher nutritional properties.
    Doctor Eimear Gallagher, of Teagasc Food Research Ashtown, is leading the current research project which primarily focuses on using “pseudo-cereals” such as amaranth, quinoa and buckwheat, to replace gluten containing grains,  also known as wheat, rye and barley. Dr. Gallagher suggests that the demand for new and improved gluten-free bread products is growing  rapidly due to greater public awareness of celiac disease, and the rise in positive celiac diagnoses'.
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    Teagasc  food researchers are also working hard to create a dairy-based ingredient that can produce the same properties in bread as gluten does. So far researchers have discovered that casein aggregates and forms a protein network which can retain gas in gluten-free dough. The reactions are similar to gluten containing wheat dough, but this is a work in progress and more studies are needed.
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    ScienceDaily (May 26, 2010)

    Destiny Stone
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    Celiac.com 07/09/2010 - The enteropathy associated with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common  symptomatic primary antibody deficient syndrome, with an estimated prevalence of one in one-hundred thousand to one in fifty thousand. However, the relationship between CVID and Enteropathy is still unclear.
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    The American Journal of Gastroenterology , (15June2010) | doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.214

    Jefferson Adams
    High Levels of Oxidative DNA Damage in Children with Celiac Disease
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    Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2010; 19: 1960–1965

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/15/2011 - Until now, studies have only shown a connection between celiac disease and functional gastrointestinal disorders in adults. No solid information exists regarding children.
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    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 2011;34(7):783-789.

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