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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Stress Common Before Celiac Diagnosis

    Caption: Photo: CC--Bottled Void

    Celiac.com 01/13/2014 - Researchers have documented stress in patients with various immune-mediated diseases but little is known about stressful life events and the onset of celiac disease from a patient's perspective. 

    Photo: CC--bottled voidUsing the standardized interview of Paykel, a team of researchers set out to examine the relationship of stressful events in patients diagnosed with celiac disease, and to compare them with a control group of gastroesophageal reflux patients.

    The research team included C. Ciacci, M. Siniscalchi, C. Bucci, F. Zingone, I. Morra, and P. Iovino, of the Department of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Salerno in Italy.

    They found that 186 adults (67.2%) with celiac disease reported more frequent and more severe life events in the years prior to the diagnosis, compared with 96 control patients (37.5%, p < 0.001, mean Paykel score 11.5 vs. 13.4, p = 0.001, respectively).

    Overall, the time lapse between the event and the diagnosis was about the same for celiac patients (5.5 months) as it was for control patients for (5.7 months).

    A total of 20.3% of celiac women considered pregnancy a negative event , but no control women defined pregnancy as a negative event..

    Repeat analyses subgroup of patients of both groups with diagnosis made within one year of onset of symptoms confirmed these findings.

    Data indicate that, before diagnosis, people with celiac disease faced stressful events that were more frequent, but less severe than in the control group suggesting that life events may impact the clinical appearance of celiac disease or accelerate its diagnosis.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/09/2009 - A team of researchers based in Finland recently demonstrated for the first time that B. lactis probiotic bacteria are capable of shielding epithelial cells from cellular damage caused by gliadin exposure.
    The research team was made up of doctors K. Lindfors, T. Blomqvist, K. Juuti-Uusitalo, S. Stenman, J. Venäläinen, M. Mäki and K. Kaukinen. They are associated with the Paediatric Research Centre for the Medical School of the Finland’s University of Tampere, the Department of Peadiatrics, and the Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery at Tampere University Hospital, and the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology of the Finland’s University of Kuopio.    
    In people with celiac disease, wheat gliadin causes serious intestinal symptoms and damages the small-bowel mucosa. Untreated, this can leave the individual at risk of developing various cancers and numerous associated conditions. Most all of this can be reversed or prevented if detected and treated early enough.
    Currently, the only effective treatment for celiac disease is a strict life-long gluten-free diet. However, a 100% gluten-free diet is nearly impossible to maintain, with so many gluten-free products containing trace amounts of gluten. Because of this, people with celiac disease face regular gluten contamination. Also because of this, acceptable alternatives are desirable.  
    Earlier studies have indicated that probiotic bacteria might be used in sourdough fermentation to induce the hydrolysis of celiac toxic gluten in food manufacturing, and thereby benefit people with celiac disease.
    Although several studies have addressed the ability of probiotic bacteria to detoxify gliadin after an extensive incubation period, the team found none that investigated whether various live probiotic bacteria can inhibit gliadin-induced toxic effects directly on epithelial cells.
    In this study the team set out to determine whether probiotics Lactobacillus fermentum or Bifidobacterium lactis might block the toxic effects of gliadin in intestinal cell culture conditions.
    To assess the degree to which live probiotics were able to block peptic-tryptic digested gliadin-induced degradation of human colon cells Caco-2, the team measured epithelial permeability by transepithelial resistance, actin cytoskeleton arrangements by the extent of membrane ruffling and expression of tight junctional protein ZO-1.
    B. lactis inhibited the gliadin-induced increase dose-dependently in epithelial permeability, and, at higher concentrations totally eliminated the gliadin-induced reduction in transepithelial resistance.
    That is, B. lactis decreased or eliminated the compromise in cell-wall resistance caused by gliadin. This means that B. lactis overcame the mechanism that gives rise to the decreased cell resistance and the increased permeability that occurs during an adverse reaction to wheat gliadin.
    The B. lactis strain also interfered with the creation of membrane ruffles in Caco-2 cells caused by gliadin exposure. Furthermore, it also shielded the tight junctions of Caco-2 cells from the toxic effects of gliadin, as shown by the way in which ZO-1 is expressed.
    The researchers concluded that live B. lactis bacteria might achieve partial to full blockage of gliadin toxicity gluten/gliadin-induced damage in the small-intestinal mucosa of people with celiac disease, and that it merits further study concerning its potential as a dietary supplement to guard against any silent damage associated with accidental gluten-contamination in celiac disease.
    Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 152: 552–558


    Jefferson Adams
    Low Rates of Biopsy May Drive Under-diagnosis of Celiac Disease
    Celiac.com 08/01/2012 - Failure to conduct small bowel biopsies during endoscopy, especially on men and people of color, may be one of the reasons that celiac disease remains under-diagnosed in the United States, according to a new study. This finding was made by a research team that set out to study sex and racial disparities in duodenal biopsy evaluations for celiac disease.
    The study, by researchers at the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC), revealed that the United States has low overall rates of small bowel biopsy.
    The research team included B. Lebwohl, C.A. Tennyson, J.L. Holub, D.A. Lieberman, A.I. Neugut, and P.H. Green. They are affiliated with the Celiac Disease Center of the Department of Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center at Columbia University, and the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York.
    Celiac disease is a common but under-diagnosed condition in the United States. Moreover, studies indicate that, although celiac disease occurs at the same frequency in both sexes, women are diagnosed at a rate that is twice that for men (2:1).
    Black patients are also diagnosed with celiac disease less frequently that non-black patients, though the rates of celiac disease in the black population remain unknown.
    For their retrospective cohort study, the team set out to measure the rates of duodenal biopsy during Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (upper endoscopy, or EGD) in patients with symptoms consistent with celiac disease. These were adult patients undergoing upper endoscopy for symptoms including diarrhea, anemia, iron deficiency, or weight loss, in which the endoscopic appearance of the upper GI tract was normal.
    To accomplish their study, the team searched the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative National Endoscopy Database from 2004 through 2009.
    They looked at data for 13,091 individuals who met the inclusion criteria, 58% of whom were female, and 9% of whom were black.
    They found that doctors performed duodenal biopsy an average of 43% of the time; 45% for female patients and 39% for male patients (P < .0001). Black patients received duodenal biopsy in 28% of EGDs performed, compared with 44% for white patients (P < .0001).
    Multivariate analysis showed that male patients (odds ratio [OR] 0.81; 95% CI, 0.75-0.88), older patients (OR for 70 years and older compared with 20-49 years, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.46-0.57), and black patients (OR 0.55; 95% CI, 0.48-0.64) received duodenal biopsy at lower rates overall.
    Over time, rates of duodenal biopsy rose slightly, but overall remained low in patients with possible clinical indications for biopsy.
    From these findings, they conclude that non-performance of duodenal biopsy during endoscopy may be contributing to the under-diagnosis of celiac disease in the United States.
    Source:
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. 2012 Jun 23.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/08/2013 - Right now, the only way for doctors to distinguish between the complicated and uncomplicated forms of celiac disease is to use invasive methods.
    In an effort to find a way other than these invasive methods to distinguish between uncomplicated and complicated forms of celiac disease, a research team set out to study serum parameters in the spectrum of celiac disease
    The research team included Greetje J Tack, Roy LJ van Wanrooij, B Mary E Von Blomberg, Hedayat Amini, Veerle MH Coupe, Petra Bonnet, Chris JJ Mulder, and Marco WJ Schreurs. They are variously affiliated with the Departments of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Pathology of VU University Medical Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and with the Department of Immunology, Erasmus MC at theUniversity Medical Centre in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    The team's cohort study looked at the possible use of new testing methods, including IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, IL-22, sCD25, sCD27, granzyme-B, sMICA and sCTLA-4 in patients diagnosed with active celiac disease, celiac disease following a gluten-free diet, Refractory celiac disease (RCD) types I and II, and enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL).
    The results showed elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory IL-8, IL-17 and sCD25 in both active celiac disease and RCDI-II. In addition, patients with RCDII showed higher serum levels of soluble granzyme-B and IL-6 compared with active celiac disease patients.
    They did not find any differences between RCDI and active celiac disease, or between RCDI and RCDII. However, they did find that EATL patients had higher IL-6 levels compared with all other groups.
    This study document a specific series of serum parameters that show that RCDII and EATL have distinct immunological features compared with uncomplicated celiac disease and RCDI. This new method of distinguishing uncomplicated and complicated forms of celiac disease might promote the development of non-invasive procedures in the future.
    Source:
     BMC Gastroenterology 2012, 12:159. doi:10.1186/1471-230X-12-159.

    Jefferson Adams
    Can Understanding Molecular Similarities Help Us Cure Autoimmune Diseases?
    Celiac.com 03/25/2015 - In what may prove to be a remarkable step in understanding human diseases, a team of scientists affiliated with Northeastern University has found a way to connect diseases based on their shared molecular interactions.
    A paper by the Northeastern team appears in the journal Science. The paper details their creation of a mathematical tool to analyze the map of the molecular interactions within cells, called the human interactome, and the discovery that over-lapping disease modules, or "neighborhoods" of disease-associated proteins, can give rise to some very unexpected relationships between diseases.
    Increasing amounts of research, says Albert-László Barabási, are making it very clear that "human diseases can be interpreted only in the context of the intricate molecular network between the cell’s components."
    Barabási is Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and University Distinguished Professor and director of Northeastern’s Center for Complex Network Research. The Northeastern researchers are based in the Center for Complex Network Research. The team comprises Barabási, Menche, postdoctoral researcher Maskim Kitsak, research assistant professor Amitabh Sharma, and graduate physics student Susan Dina Ghiassian, PhD’15.
    For their study, the Northeastern team analyzed 299 diseases that had at least 20 associated genes. They found that 226 of the diseases had their own specific "neighborhood" within the interactome. They noticed that diseases within the same neighborhood had more in common in terms of molecular functions or symptoms, while diseases that were far away from each other within the interactome had very little in common in terms of molecular functions or symptoms.
    Among their findings, they noted that asthma, and celiac disease are localized in overlapping neighborhoods, which suggests shared molecular roots, even though they have very different pathobiologies.
    This is the first study to show that the available network maps offer enough coverage and accuracy to provide valuable information about the molecular origins of disease-disease relationships, says Jörg Menche, a postodoctoral researcher and one of the authors on the paper.
    This is a very interesting and potentially promising discovery that may pave the way for a much deeper understanding of relationships between celiac and numerous other diseases.
    Stay tuned for more news.
    Source:
    Northeasternnews.edu 

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    Rinsing it off under running water real good, this is to get any CC off. Examples, if there is a open air bakery some flour might have settled on your produce at the grocery store. OR if they are giving out samples some person might have been handling a dounut and touched your produce. Rinsing it off under running water works to remove any trace amounts normally.

    Organic. some people in general react to stuff used in growing produce, IE glyphostphate, or like me I have a issue with the wax they coat them with to keep the fresh. Going organic or farmers market fresh helps some with these. I think your nutritionist is covering all the bases.
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