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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    TINY PARTICLES A BIG BREAKTHROUGH ON CELIAC DISEASE CURE?


    Jefferson Adams

    Celiac.com 07/07/2015 - Could proprietary antigen-specific nano-particles offer a potential cure for celiac disease? Early results are very positive, say a team of researchers.


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    Photo: Dr.FaroukIn what will likely prove to be interesting news for many people with celiac disease, Cour Pharmaceutical Development Company has announced "a significant breakthrough in celiac treatment [that] has the potential to cure celiac patients rather than relying on gluten avoidance, immune suppressive regimens or dietary supplements," according to a company press release.

    According to the release, new data from a pre-clinical live animal study demonstrate a reversal of the effects of dietary gluten exposure in animals sensitized to gluten.

    If true, their use of robust antigen specific nano-particle therapy could be a major breakthrough in celiac disease treatment.

    A study conducted at the Haartman Institute of the University of Helsinki tested Cour's novel bio-engineered nano-particles, COUR-NP-GLI, in an animal model of celiac disease. The COUR-NP-GLI are Toleragenic Immune Modifying nanoParticles (TIMP) consisting of a safe proprietary polymer and antigenic proteins (gliadins). The antigens are fully encapsulated for safety and dosing is administered intravenously.

    Once processed, the TIMPs control and regulate the auto-reactive T-cells, the primary driver of disease.

    Cour's targeted antigen-specific therapy has been successfully studied across multiple disease models including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, food allergies and now celiac disease. COUR-NP-GLI works by targeting a broad set of gliadin proteins found in wheat gluten, the class of antigenic proteins widely regarded as the main cause of celiac disease. Treatment with COUR-NP-GLI ameliorated symptoms of celiac disease even during gluten consumption.

    The study team concludes that Cour-NP-GLI was safely administered via intravenous infusion, while
    Cour-NP-GLI treated animals previously sensitized to gluten maintained normal body weight even during continued exposure to gluten containing diet.

    Animals treated with Cour-NP-GLI showed significantly better duodenal biopsies results compared to non-treated animals. Cour-NP-GLI treated animals showed significantly lower inflammatory cytokines compared to non-treated animals. Overall, animals treated with Cour-NP-GLI showed comparable or better results than animals treated with a gluten-free diet.

    The company presented data on Cour-NP-GLI at the 16th Annual International Celiac Disease Symposium, held June 21-24, 2015 in Prague, Czech Republic.

    While there have been other claims made about potential cures, this is the first animal model demonstration of a treatment that effectively cures celiac disease. If these results hold up to scrutiny, and if successful treatments can be developed, this approach has tremendous potential to benefit numerous people with celiac disease.

    Now, to be fair, much study, review, and consideration must happen for such a treatment to be developed, but it is exciting news, nonetheless.

    Source:


    Image Caption: Photo: Dr.Farouk
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    Guest dappycharlie

    Posted

    The sad part of this is that it will most likely languish for years instead of propelling through testing and possible approval that could/would help millions of people worldwide.

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    Helsinki, well if it pans out that's not too far to travel cause it'll never get FDA approval in my lifetime.

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    Guest Susie

    Posted

    Happy to hear that $$ are being spent on finding a cure instead of all the talk about studies on why we react to gluten! Since I am not a youngster, I doubt that the tests, research and approval will come to fruition in my day. However, I agree with Namklak, messing with the immune system could backfire! Just like chemo, I'm sure it will correct the bad but in the process also harm the good!

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    Guest Michael

    Posted

    Well, I see that the board of directors and the CEO got their start with the genetic modification of corn at DeKalb Genetics, which they sold to Monsanto. Yeah, I remember when I was renting a farmhouse in Illinois and the old schoolhouse and grounds next door where the little kids would play was suddenly silenced by the DeKalb sign and the whole schoolyard was ominously filled with their corn in 1976.

     

    And I see it is written of one of the co inventors of the technology "His work has provided ground-breaking insights into virus-host interactions. His early work discovered the ability of viruses, like West Nile Virus to hijack cellular machinery to trick the immune system. More recently he has pioneered new understanding surrounding immune pathology observed in the brain after infection and during autoimmunity."

     

    Yeah, this will be a combination of the viruses that are used in the development of GMOs to transfer the gene of any given species of any life form into another with the amazing and magical proprietary nanoparticles like they use in aviation and weather control, producing chemtrails full of aluminum nanoparticles that are being distributed in our soil, food and bodies. Together, they got together in the environment with all the excess plastics and produced Morgellon's Disease, but the government had Kaiser Permanente (of course they have no experience in nanotechnology or the use of viruses to transfer DNA) whitewash that whole thing.

     

    And the research is being done at universities all across our country that have absolutely no experience in celiac disease. And of course there's no chance there is a neurologist with any knowledge of gluten ataxia or the immunological knowledge that the immune system in the brain is completely different from that of the rest of the body and is much harder to turn off. And the FDA and USDA are controlled by former Monsanto higher ups. Oh, and don't forget, the federal laws do not allow you to sue the makers of vaccines, and this qualifies as a vaccine! How exciting indeed!

     

    But, the head of Beth Israel Deaconess medical Center is on the scientific advisory committee, who will be speaking in an NFCA webinar Tuesday July 24th.

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    Guest Michael

    Posted

    Helsinki, well if it pans out that's not too far to travel cause it'll never get FDA approval in my lifetime.

    Go to the Cour Pharmaceutical website and read. The board of directors and CEO got their start genetically modifying corn at DeKalb Genetics, which they sold to Monsanto. The FDA and USDA are headed by former Monsanto higher ups. This vaccine will fly through approval so fast it will make your head spin. These are part of the most pro-grain, pro-chemical, pro-vaccine cartel that controls the world. Soon the government will be requiring this vaccine and everyone will be telling celiacs to get inoculated and shut up.

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    Guest admin

    Posted

    Go to the Cour Pharmaceutical website and read. The board of directors and CEO got their start genetically modifying corn at DeKalb Genetics, which they sold to Monsanto. The FDA and USDA are headed by former Monsanto higher ups. This vaccine will fly through approval so fast it will make your head spin. These are part of the most pro-grain, pro-chemical, pro-vaccine cartel that controls the world. Soon the government will be requiring this vaccine and everyone will be telling celiacs to get inoculated and shut up.

    I doubt most conspiracy theories...

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    Guest Michael

    Posted

    I doubt most conspiracy theories...

    Not necessarily a conspiracy as you think of one, just capitalism, democracy and the American way (notice I left out "truth, justice"). I recommend you watch the movie "Bought".

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    Guest Jefferson

    Posted

    Well, I see that the board of directors and the CEO got their start with the genetic modification of corn at DeKalb Genetics, which they sold to Monsanto. Yeah, I remember when I was renting a farmhouse in Illinois and the old schoolhouse and grounds next door where the little kids would play was suddenly silenced by the DeKalb sign and the whole schoolyard was ominously filled with their corn in 1976.

     

    And I see it is written of one of the co inventors of the technology "His work has provided ground-breaking insights into virus-host interactions. His early work discovered the ability of viruses, like West Nile Virus to hijack cellular machinery to trick the immune system. More recently he has pioneered new understanding surrounding immune pathology observed in the brain after infection and during autoimmunity."

     

    Yeah, this will be a combination of the viruses that are used in the development of GMOs to transfer the gene of any given species of any life form into another with the amazing and magical proprietary nanoparticles like they use in aviation and weather control, producing chemtrails full of aluminum nanoparticles that are being distributed in our soil, food and bodies. Together, they got together in the environment with all the excess plastics and produced Morgellon's Disease, but the government had Kaiser Permanente (of course they have no experience in nanotechnology or the use of viruses to transfer DNA) whitewash that whole thing.

     

    And the research is being done at universities all across our country that have absolutely no experience in celiac disease. And of course there's no chance there is a neurologist with any knowledge of gluten ataxia or the immunological knowledge that the immune system in the brain is completely different from that of the rest of the body and is much harder to turn off. And the FDA and USDA are controlled by former Monsanto higher ups. Oh, and don't forget, the federal laws do not allow you to sue the makers of vaccines, and this qualifies as a vaccine! How exciting indeed!

     

    But, the head of Beth Israel Deaconess medical Center is on the scientific advisory committee, who will be speaking in an NFCA webinar Tuesday July 24th.

    "...like they use in aviation and weather control, producing chemtrails full of aluminum nanoparticles that are being distributed in our soil, food and bodies. "

     

    Chemtrails? Weather control? Seriously? I don't know whether to laugh at you, or weep for you.

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    Jefferson Adams
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    Jefferson Adams
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