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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    TOXICITY MECHANISMS OF WHEAT AND OTHER CEREALS IN CELIAC DISEASE AND RELATED ENTEROPATHIES - ITALY


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    Author: Auricchio S; De Ritis G; De Vincenzi M; Silano V.
    Source: J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr, 1985 Dec, 4:6, 923-30.


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    This paper is a critical appraisal of current theories on the mechanisms of toxicity of wheat and other cereals in celiac disease and some related enteropathies. The peptidase deficiency, primary immune defect, and gluten-lectin theories on celiac disease are examined and critically discussed on the basis of the relevant data available in 88 references. Special attention has been paid in this review to the nature of the cereal components triggering the appearance of toxic symptoms and signs in celiac disease as well as to underlying action mechanisms. The gluten-lectin theory is the one best able to explain celiac disease. It also explains some secondary intolerance that may occur in temporarily predisposed individuals as a consequence to viral hepatitis and intestinal infections, as well as the occurrence of intestinal lesions in healthy subjects that are administered very high amounts of gluten.


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    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 06/10/2010 - New research is currently underway in Ireland, as researchers test "pseudo-cereals" to determine the quality of  replacements for glutenous grains such as, wheat, rye and barley. Many celiacs, especially those with delayed diagnosis', suffer from malabsorbtion and malnutrition. It is therefore more important for celiacs to ingest grains that are vitamin fortified than it is for non-celiacs. Researchers at Teagasc Food Research Ashtown are attempting to address the nutritional concerns for gluten-free products. They are working to  formulate gluten-free bread products that are tasty, and have higher nutritional properties.
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    Source:

    ScienceDaily (May 26, 2010)

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:

    MedScape.com: Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2011: Abstract 620. Presented May 9, 2011.

    Gryphon Myers
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    Source:
    http://www.sacbee.com/2012/09/04/4784050/immusant-initiates-clinical-trials.html

    Jefferson Adams
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    Read the entire study in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.
    Source:
    J Exp Med. 2012 Dec 17;209(13):2395-408. doi: 10.1084/jem.20102660

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    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
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