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    Vitamin D Preserves the Intestinal Mucosal Barrier


    Roy Jamron

    Celiac.com 11/02/2007 - Researchers at the University of Chicago using vitamin D receptor "knockout" mice demonstrated vitamin D may have a key role in maintaining the intestinal mucosal barrier and the integrity of tight junctions.  The "knockout" mice were genetically altered to produce mice lacking vitamin D receptors normally expressed by cells in most body tissues.  A dextran sulfate sodium solution was used to induce colitis in both normal control mice and "knockout" mice.  Normal mice resisted intestinal mucosal injury from the dextran sulfate sodium solution, but "knockout" mice "developed severe diarrhea, rectal bleeding and marked body weight loss, leading to death in 2 weeks" and displayed severe colonic ulceration, impaired wound-healing, and tight junction disruption.  Additional study in cell cultures found vitamin D markedly enhanced and preserved tight junction integrity in the presence of dextran sulfate sodium and also stimulated epithelial healing.  The study concluded vitamin D deficiency may compromise the mucosal barrier, increasing susceptibility to mucosal damage and the risk of bowel disorders.


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    It is possible a vitamin D deficiency early in life could be a factor in triggering the onset of celiac disease as well as slowing the recovery of the mucosa after celiac disease is diagnosed and treated.  Reduced sun exposure due to modern changing life styles might account for an increasing incidence celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders.  Vitamin D deficiency at the time gluten is introduced into an infant's diet could also play a role in celiac disease onset.  A previous study performed in Sweden found babies born in summer more susceptible to celiac disease than babies born in winter.  If gluten is first introduced to babies some 6 months after birth, seasonal variation of vitamin D levels might account for the difference, i.e. summer-born babies would receive their first gluten in midwinter when sun exposure is minimal.  Since breastfed babies obtain vitamin D from mother's milk, nursing mothers need to be sure to maintain high vitamin D levels during winter months.

    A study just released by the National Cancer Institute examined the relationship between serum 25(OH)D levels and total cancer mortality in 16818 participants and concluded "results do not support an association between 25(OH)D and total cancer mortality."  However, the study did find "colorectal cancer mortality was inversely related to serum 25(OH)D level, with levels 80 nmol/L or higher associated with a 72% risk reduction compared with lower than 50 nmol/L."  The fact that vitamin D appears to lower colon cancer mortality risk is consistant with the preservation role vitamin D appears to play in maintaining the intestinal mucosal barrier.  Note that this study does not consider whether receiving daily doses of vitamin D supplements much higher than current recommendations would provide a cancer risk benefit.

    ---------
    Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2007 Oct 25.
    Novel Role of the Vitamin D Receptor in Maintaining the Integrity of the Intestinal Mucosal Barrier.
    Kong J, Zhang Z, Musch MW, Ning G, Sun J, Hart J, Bissonnette M, Li YC.
    Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States; Chicago, Illinois, United States.
    http://ajpgi.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/00398.2007v1 .

    ----------
    J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Jan;57(1):36-9.
    Children born in the summer have increased risk for coeliac disease.
    Ivarsson A, Hernell O, Nystrom L, Persson LA.
    Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology, Umea University, Umea, Sweden.
    http://jech.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/57/1/36 .

    ----------
    J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Oct 30.
    Prospective Study of Serum Vitamin D and Cancer Mortality in the United States.
    D. Michal Freedman, Anne C. Looker, Shih-Chen Chang, Barry I. Graubard.
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD; National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Hyattsville, MD.
    http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/djm204 .

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    Guest PatBrown

    Posted

    I found it very interesting as I am celiac and my son refuses to be tested. Fortunately his GP is a nurse and will listen to me if they marry and have children.

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    Guest Susan Adley-Warrick

    Posted

    Excellent summary of the significance of the study, it will be of help to me in my own research.

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    Guest SallyFree

    Posted

    I find updates very interesting and beneficial to me as I suffer from intestinal permeability.

     

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    Guest Gerald Jones

    Posted

    I am celiac and have been hospitalized twice since June of 2007 due to dehydration brought on by severe diarrhea. I started taking vitamin D supplements recently on the advice of my doctor to counteract the effects of Prednisone bone loss. Maybe this will help in other ways based on this article. Thanks...

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    Guest June-Bug

    Posted

    I have autoimmune disorders, colitis, gluten and dairy allergy. This summer I added D and K2 and K and got pregnant with twins. [This is my first time] I am in my 2nd trimester and only take K once a week, it helps me deal with unwanted stomach pain and colitis. I have cut back on the added D. D is now in Rice milk and my prenatal has D as D3 200 iu.

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  • About Me

    Roy S. Jamron holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Engineering Applied Science from the University of California at Davis, and independently investigates the latest research on celiac disease and related disorders.

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  • Related Articles

    Roy Jamron
    Celiac.com 07/31/2006 - A two-year study in the July 2006 Endoscopy showed older celiac patients on a gluten-free diet have an incomplete histological recovery even after two years. Only the younger patients (5 - 30 years) showed significant improvement of histology within 12 months (P < 0.034); older patients (>30 years) showed histological improvement but this was not statistically significant, even after 24 months on a gluten-free diet. This study was also previously discussed in an article by Dr. Antonio Tursi in the Spring 2006 Celiac.com Scott-Free Newsletter. This also means increased intestinal permeability and associated problems such as liver damage may continue to be a lasting problem in older patients beyond two years on a gluten-free diet. Below is the abstract:
     

    Endoscopy 2006 July; 38(7): 702-707
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    Tursi, A.; Brandimarte, G.; Giorgetti, G. M.; Elisei, W.; Inchingolo, C. D.; Monardo, E.; Aiello, F.
     


    Background and study aims: Published follow-up data on small-intestinal recovery in patients with celiac disease are scarce and contradictory. This is especially the case for adult patients, who often show incomplete histological recovery after starting a gluten-free diet (GFD). We conducted a 2-year prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of a GFD in improving the endoscopic and histological duodenal findings in adults with celiac disease.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2007 - A recent study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology suggests that individuals afflicted with celiac disease in childhood suffer long-term mortality rates that are three times higher than those of the general population
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/29/2007 - A study that appeared in the August issue of Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, found that celiac disease and small intestinal bacterial growth both show increased levels of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), especially gammadelta+ IELs. A sharp increase in gammadelta+ IELs has been noted in people with celiac disease, but little is known about the role of this particular class of IELs in other intestinal pathologies.
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    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com. 

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/24/2014 - Two new studies have confirmed colonization of gluten-degrading bacteria in the human mouth and in the upper gastrointestinal tracts respectively.
    Both studies come out of the Department of Periodontology and Oral Biology, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. The research teams included Maram Zamakhchari, Guoxian Wei, Floyd Dewhirst, Jaeseop Lee, Detlef Schuppan, Frank G. Oppenheim, and Eva J. Helmerhorst.
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    Source:
    PLoS One. 2011;6(9):e24455. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0024455. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20948997

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
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    Roxanne Bracknell
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
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    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au