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  • Jefferson Adams

    What Can Gut Microbiomes Teach Us About Gastrointestinal Distress in Children?

      Both gastrointestinal and mental disorders can occur alongside other disorders, and both can be triggered by early adversity, such as parental deprivation. Can gut health and gut microbiomes help us understand why?

    Caption: Foster care party. Image CC--Larry Jacobsen

    Celiac.com 05/02/2019 - Both gastrointestinal and mental disorders can occur alongside other disorders, and both can be triggered by early adversity, such as parental deprivation. 

    Interactions between the brain and bacteria that live in the gut microbiome potentially influence interactions between adversity, gastrointestinal issues and anxiety. These connections have been well-studied in animals, but very little study has been done during human development. What can we learn about mood and gastrointestinal distress in children exposed to adversity?

    A team of researchers recently set out to explore adversity–gastrointestinal–anxiety associations in youth who were raised with their biological parents, or were exposed to early adverse care giving experiences, such as institutional or foster care followed by international adoption.

    The research team included Bridget L. Callaghan, Andrea Fields, Dylan G. Gee, Laurel Gabard-Durnam, Christina Caldera, Kathryn L. Humphreys, Bonnie Goff, Jessica Flannery, Eva H. Telzer, Mor Shapiro and Nim Tottenham. 

    To assess connections between adversity, gastrointestinal issues, and anxiety, the team assessed data from a 344 youth, aged from 3–18 years old, who were raised with biological parents, or else exposed to early adverse care giving experiences, such as institutional or foster care followed by international adoption. 

    In Study 1, we demonstrated that previous adverse care experiences were associated with increased incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms in youth. Gastrointestinal symptoms were also associated with concurrent and future anxiety (measured across 5 years), and those gastrointestinal symptoms mediated the adversity–anxiety association at Time 1. 

    Study 2 comprised a sub-sample of children who provided both stool samples and functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, and served as a “proof-of-principle."

    The data from study 2 showed that adversity was tied to changes in both alpha and beta diversity of microbial communities, and both adversity-associated and adversity-independent bacteria level correlated with prefrontal cortex activation to emotional faces. 

    Read more about the implications of these data for supporting youth mental health at Cambridge.org

     

    The researchers are variously affiliated with the Department of Psychology, Columbia University in New York, NY; the Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne University, Melbourne, Australia; the Department of Psychology, Yale University in New Haven, CT; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at the University of California Los Angeles in Los Angeles; the Department of Psychology and Human Development at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN, USA; the Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; the Department of Psychology at the University of Oregon in Eugene, OR; the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in Chapel Hill, NC; and the David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, CA.


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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Fecal Microbiota Transplant Restores Gut Microbiome
    Celiac.com 09/16/2016 - Great news about poop transplants: They work! And now doctors kind of understand how and why they work. This is good news about a humor provoking, but very serious matter.
    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most common health care-associated infections, and up to 40% of patients suffer from recurrence of disease following standard antibiotic therapy. C. difficile infection has proven to be very difficult to treat. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been successfully used to treat recurrent C. difficile infection. Doctors hypothesize that FMT promotes recovery of a microbiota capable of colonization resistance to C. difficile. However, they didn't really understand how it worked.
    Recently, a research team investigated changes in the fecal microbiota structure following FMT in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, and imputed a hypothetical functional profile based on the 16S rRNA profile, using a predictive metagenomic tool. After FMT, they also noted increased relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreased abundance of Proteobacteria.
    The research team included Anna M. Seekatz, Johannes Aas, Charles E. Gessert, Timothy A. Rubin, Daniel M. Saman, Johan S. Bakken, and Vincent B. Young. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA; Essentia Health, Department of Gastroenterology, Duluth, Minnesota, USA; Essentia Institute of Rural Health, Duluth, Minnesota, USA; and St. Luke's Hospital, Section of Infectious Diseases, Duluth, Minnesota, USA.
    Their results showed that, after transplantation, fecal microbiota of recipients was more diverse, and more similar to the donor profile, than the microbiota before transplantation. Additionally, they observed differences in the imputed metagenomic profile. In particular, amino acid transport systems were over-represented in samples collected prior to transplantation.
    These results Indicate that functional changes accompany microbial structural changes following this therapy. Further identification of the specific microbiota, and functions that promote colonization resistance, may help to create better treatment methods for C. difficile infection.
    Source:
    mBio. 2014 May-Jun; 5(3): e00893-14. Published online 2014 Jun 17. doi: 10.1128/mBio.00893-14. PMCID: PMC4068257

    Jefferson Adams
    Why Your Microbiome is the Future of Celiac Disease Treatment
    Celiac.com 12/25/2017 - In the very near future, your personal microbiome may be the key to creating a customized treatment for celiac disease.
    That's because new advances in genome studies are promising to help create a customized, individual approach for treating numerous disorders, including celiac disease. Such individualized treatments may also help to reduce adverse events, and decrease health care costs.
    So far, a similar approach for optimizing preventive and therapeutic approaches in cancer using human genome sequencing has proven successful.
    Writing in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, ad team of researches expounded on this approach. The research team included Purna C. Kashyap, Nicholas Chia, PhD, Heidi Nelson, MD, Eran Segal, PhD, and Eran Elinav, MD, PhD. They are variously affiliated with the Enteric Neuroscience Program, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; the Department of Computer Science at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel and with the Department of Immunology, at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.
    Your personal microbiome is the sum total of all the microbes that reside within and upon you, along with all their genetic elements. Using genome sequencing allows doctors to design highly personal, highly focused treatments and therapeutic strategies.
    In their review for the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, the team highlights the importance of the microbiome in all aspects of human disease, including pathogenesis, phenotype, prognosis, and treatment response. The microbiome also plays a crucial role as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker.
    The team's report describes the role to be played by next-generation sequencing in helping to provide precision microbial identification of infectious diseases, and helping to elucidate the nature and function of microbial communities.
    Basically, as we further unlock the human genome, we can begin to better understand the role played by the myriad microbes that make up the human microbiome. As we unlock the role of various parts of the microbiome, look for major advances and refinements to diagnosing, treating, and even conquering conditions like celiac disease, and many others. And, with advances coming at breakneck speed, look for this to happen sooner, rather than later.
    Source:
    PlumX Metrics - mayoclinicproceedings.org

    Jefferson Adams
    Can Early Life Gut Microbiota Predict Celiac Disease Development?
    Celiac.com 04/16/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate whether alterations in the developing intestinal microbiota and immune markers precede celiac disease onset in infants with family risk for the disease.
    The research team included Marta Olivares, Alan W. Walker, Amalia Capilla, Alfonso Benítez-Páez, Francesc Palau, Julian Parkhill, Gemma Castillejo, and Yolanda Sanz. They are variously affiliated with the Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health Research Unit, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), C/Catedrático Agustín Escardin, Paterna, Valencia, Spain; the Gut Health Group, The Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; the Genetics and Molecular Medicine Unit, Institute of Biomedicine of Valencia, National Research Council (IBV-CSIC), Valencia, Spain; the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire UK; the Hospital Universitari de Sant Joan de Reus, IISPV, URV, Tarragona, Spain; the Center for regenerative medicine, Boston university school of medicine, Boston, USA; and the Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu and CIBERER, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain
    The team conducted a nested case-control study out as part of a larger prospective cohort study, which included healthy full-term newborns (> 200) with at least one first relative with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The present study includes 10 cases of celiac disease, along with 10 best-matched controls who did not develop the disease after 5-year follow-up.
    The team profiled fecal microbiota, as assessed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, along with immune parameters, at 4 and 6 months of age and related to celiac disease onset. The microbiota of infants who remained healthy showed an increase in bacterial diversity over time, especially by increases in microbiota from the Firmicutes families, those who with no increase in bacterial diversity developed celiac disease.
    Infants who subsequently developed celiac disease showed a significant reduction in sIgA levels over time, while those who remained healthy showed increases in TNF-α correlated to Bifidobacterium spp.
    Healthy children in the control group showed a greater relative abundance of Bifidobacterium longum, while children who developed celiac disease showed increased levels of Bifidobacterium breve and Enterococcus spp.
    The data from this study suggest that early changes in gut microbiota in infants with celiac disease risk could influence immune development, and thus increase risk levels for celiac disease. The team is calling for larger studies to confirm their hypothesis.
    Source:
    Microbiome. 2018; 6: 36. Published online 2018 Feb 20. doi: 10.1186/s40168-018-0415-6

    Jefferson Adams
    Reducing Dietary Gluten Causes Changes to Intestinal Microbiome of Healthy Adults
    Celiac.com 12/10/2018 - More and more people are eating gluten-free for non-medical reasons. These days, people with celiac disease make up a small percentage of overall gluten-free food sales. However, the effects of eliminating or reducing wheat, barley and rye ingredients from the diets of in healthy adults have not been well studied. A team of researchers recently set out to assess the effects of a gluten-free diet in healthy adults.
    To make their assessment, the researchers conducted a randomized, controlled, cross-over trial of 60 middle-aged Danish adults with no known diseases. The trial included two 8-week assessments comparing a low-gluten diet of 2 grams of gluten per day, and a high-gluten diet of 18 grams of gluten per day, separated by a washout period of at least six weeks with habitual diet including 12 grams of gluten per day. 
    Compared with a high-gluten diet, the data show that a low-gluten diet triggers slight changes in the intestinal microbiome, increases food and drink intake and postprandial hydrogen exhalation, and reduces self-reported bloating. The team’s data indicate that results of a low-gluten diet in non-celiac adults are likely triggered by qualitative changes in dietary fiber.
    Studies like this are important for understanding the effects of a gluten-free diet in both celiacs and non-celiacs alike. Better understanding of a gluten-free diet will help doctors, celiac patients, and healthy individuals to make better, more informed dietary decisions.
    Source:
    Nature Communications; volume 9, Article number: 4630 (2018)   
    The research team included Lea B. S. Hansen, Henrik M. Roager, Nadja B. Søndertoft, Rikke J. Gøbel, Mette Kristensen, Mireia Vallès-Colomer, Sara Vieira-Silva, Sabine Ibrügger, Mads V. Lind, Rasmus B. Mærkedahl, Martin I. Bahl, Mia L. Madsen, Jesper Havelund, Gwen Falony, Inge Tetens, Trine Nielsen, Kristine H. Allin, Henrik L. Frandsen, Bolette Hartmann, Jens Juul Holst, Morten H. Sparholt, Jesper Holck, Andreas Blennow, Janne Marie Moll, Anne S. Meyer, Camilla Hoppe, Jørgen H. Poulsen, Vera Carvalho, Domenico Sagnelli, Marlene D. Dalgaard, Anders F. Christensen, Magnus Christian Lydolph, Alastair B. Ross, Silas Villas-Bôas, Susanne Brix, Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén, Karsten Buschard, Allan Linneberg, Jüri J. Rumessen, Claus T. Ekstrøm, Christian Ritz, Karsten Kristiansen, H. Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik Vestergaard, Nils J. Færgeman, Jeroen Raes, Hanne Frøkiær, Torben Hansen, Lotte Lauritzen, Ramneek Gupta, Tine Rask Licht and Oluf Pedersen. 
    They are variously affiliated with the National Food Institute; the Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark; the Department of Bio and Health Informatics; the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark in Lyngby, Denmark; the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences; the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports; the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports; and the Department of Veterinary Disease Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen in Frederiksberg, Denmark; the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; the Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Copenhagen University Hospital Hvidovre in Hvidovre, Denmark; the Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Autoimmunology & Biomarkers, Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden; the School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland in Auckland, New Zealand; the Bartholin Institute, Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Research Centre for Prevention and Health, The Capital Region of Denmark in Frederiksberg, Denmark; the Research Unit and Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, the Capital Region of Denmark in Herlev, Denmark; with Clinical-Microbiomics A/S in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, KU Leuven–University of Leuven, Rega Institute; and VIB, Center for Microbiology in Leuven, Belgium; with Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen in Copenhagen, Denmark; the Laboratory of Genomics and Molecular Biomedicine, Department of Biology; the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research; the Department of Radiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; and the Department of Biomedical Sciences; and the department of Biostatistics at the Department of Public Health at the University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

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